Natural Gas

hedgeless_horseman's picture

Fracking responsible for the big boost in US crude production?





If fracking comes to your neighborhood, it may be a good idea to get in on some Reg D Private Placement offerings...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: The Top 5 Oil & Gas Plays For 2012





2012 has been a stellar year for oil and gas. From East Africa to North America, new technology, major new discoveries, an unparalleled appetite for exploration and a metamorphosing perception of risk have changed the playing field. We’re looking at potential rather than existing production, and here are our Top 5 picks for this year.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Obama Likely To Approve Gold Sanctions on Iran As Currency Wars Escalate





Turkey’s trade balance may turn on whether President Barack Obama vetoes more stringent sanctions against Iran after the U.S. Senate passed a measure targeting loopholes in gold exports to the Islamic Republic. Turkey’s gold trade with neighbouring Iran has helped shrink its trade deficit over the past year according to Bloomberg. Incredibly, precious metals accounted for about half of the almost $21 billion decline. That’s calmed investor concern over its current-account gap, and helped persuade Fitch Ratings to give Turkey its first investment-grade rating since 1994.  The U.S. Senate voted 94-0 on Nov. 30 to approve new sanctions against Iran, closing gaps from previous measures, including trade in precious metals. Obama, who opposes the move on the grounds it may undercut existing efforts to rein in the nation’s nuclear ambitions, signed an executive order in July restricting gold payments to Iranian state institutions. Turkey exported $11.9 billion of gold in the first 10 months of the year, according to the Ankara-based statistics agency’s website. A very large 85% of the shipments went to Iran and the United Arab Emirates. Iran is buying the gold with payments Turkey makes for natural gas it purchases in liras, Turkish Deputy Prime Minister Ali Babacan told a parliamentary committee in Ankara on Nov. 23.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Weekly Bull/Bear Recap: Dec. 3-7, 2012





Your comprehensive yet concise, one-stop summary of all the bullish and bearish events of the past week.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: December 7





  • Bundesbank cuts growth outlook as crisis bites (Reuters)
  • Strong quake hits off Japan near Fukushima disaster zone (Reuters)
  • Greece to Buy Debt It Already Owns to Reach Target (BBG)
  • Draghi’s Go-to ECB Seen Risking Credibility Through Overload (BBG)
  • Judge urges Apple and Samsung ‘peace’  (FT) ... Alas only the US government has a Magic Money Tree; others need profit
  • Fed Exit Plan May Be Redrawn as Assets Near $3 Trillion (BBG)... make that $5 trillion this time in 2014
  • Level Global, SAC Fund Managers Ruled Co-Conspirators (BBG)
  • Egypt demonstrators reject Mursi call for dialogue (Reuters)
  • Japanese Dealerships in China Retrench in Wake of Dispute (BBG)
  • Apparel factory fire reveals big brands' shadowy supply chainsa (Reuters)
  • Republican Defectors Weigh Deal on Tax-Rate Increase (BBG)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: December 6





  • MSM discovers window dressing: Fund Managers Lift Results With Timely Trading Sprees (WSJ)
  • White House Unyielding on Debt Limit (WSJ)
  • Obama, Boehner talk; Geithner prepared to go off "cliff" (Reuters)
  • Republicans urged to resist tax rises (FT)
  • China looms large over Japanese poll (FT)
  • As predicted here two months ago, Greek Bond Buyback Leads S&P to Cut to Selective Default (BBG)
  • Japan opposition LDP set to win solid election majority – polls (BBG), but...
  • Japan Opposition LDP’s Main Ally Cautions Abe on BOJ Pressure (BBG)
  • U.S. and Europe Tackle Russia Trade (WSJ)
  • King Seen Maintaining QE as Osborne Extends Fiscal Squeeze (BBG)
  • Syria pound fall suggests currency crisis (FT)
  • Irish budget seeks extra €3.5bn (FT)
  • U.K. Extends Cuts Due to Poor Outlook (WSJ)
  • ECB Seen Refraining From Rate Cuts as Yields Sink on Bond Plan (BBG)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: December 5





  • LA port workers to return Wednesday (AP)
  • Iran says extracts data from U.S. spy drone (Reuters)
  • Obama to stress need to raise debt limit "without drama" (Reuters)
  • Big Lots Chief Probed by SEC (WSJ)
  • NATO missiles to be sent to Turkey, Syria clashes rage (Reuters)
  • GOP Deficit Plan Irks Conservatives (WSJ)
  • Japan Can End Deflation in Months, Shirakawa Professor Says (BBG) ... almost as good as Bernanke ending inflation in 15 minutes.
  • Osborne Prepares to Breach Fiscal Rules Amid U.K. Growth Slump (BBG)
  • Global Banking Under Siege as Regulators Guard National Interest (BBG)
  • Freeport plans return to energy (FT)
  • Serbian NATO envoy jumps to death at Brussels airport (Reuters)
  • Tide Turns After a Flood of Chinese Listings (WSJ)
  • Australian economy loses steam (FT)
  • Euro Crisis Feeds Corruption as Greece Slides in Rankings (BBG)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

First Japan, Then India, Now Vietnam; China Unfriending Everyone





Yesterday we noted that India was preparing to send its Navy into the South China Sea - defending its mineral rights from China's increasingly vociferous presence. The Philippines also expressed concern. Today, it's Vietnam's turn as Reuters reports the nation is condemning China's "serious violation of sovereignty" as Chinese boats sabotaged Vietnamese State oil and gas company - PetroVietnam's operations (by severing a seismic cable). The actions stem from China's 'belief' that two Vietnamese-owned archipelagos (Spratly and Paracel Islands) are theirs. While China (who oppose unilateral oil and gas development in disputed waters) argued somewhat comically that "Chinese fishing boats were operating normally," the Vietnamese saw it as "blatant violation of Vietnamese waters," and are deploying marine police and a border force to stop foreign vessels. As one analyst noted, "It's going to lead to friction."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

How A Spanish Scam Artist Punk'd The Ukraine For $1.1 Billion





A snapshot of (quite amusing) "New Normal" dealmaking in the insolvent continent.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Bill Gross Latest Monthly Outlook: "We May Need At Least A Decade For The Healing"





Bill Gross' latest monthly missive begins with some political commentary on the latest presidential election, pointing out the obvious: after the euphoria comes the hangover, completely irrelevant of what happens to the Fiscal Cliff: 'whoever succeeds President Obama, the next four years will likely face structural economic headwinds that will frustrate the American public. “Happy days are here again” was the refrain of FDR in the Depression, but the theme song from 2012 and beyond may more closely resemble Strawberry Fields Forever, as Lennon laments “It’s getting hard to be someone but it all works out.” Why is it so hard to be someone these days, to pay for college, get a good-paying job and retire comfortably?" And while political campaigns were just that, the truth is that nobody has the trump card to a perfect quadrangle of problems which will mire the US economy for years to come, among which i) debt/deleveraging; ii) globalization, iii) technology, and iv) demographics. Gross' outlook is thus hardly as optimistic as all those sellside reports we have been drowned by in the past 2 weeks, hoping to stir the animal spirits one more time: 'We may need at least a decade for the healing.... it is getting harder to maintain the economic growth that investors have become accustomed to. The New Normal, like Strawberry Fields will “take you down” and lower your expectation of future asset returns. It may not last “forever” but it will be with us for a long, long time." Sad: looks like it won't be different this time after all...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: India's African "Safari"





Although its interests in the continent are broadly similar, India’s engagement with Africa differs significantly from China. Will it prove sustainable? Close ties between India and Africa are not new. Trade has flourished between East Africa and India’s west coast for centuries. New Delhi’s interest in Africa waned in the 1990s, but rapid economic growth and soaring energy requirements, however, forced India at the turn of the new millennium to rethink its neglect of Africa. The domination of oil and natural resources in India’s imports from Africa and of manufactured goods in its exports to the continent has drawn criticism that India is indulging in a “neo-colonial grab” for Africa’s resources. "This is an uninformed view. Africa of today is not the same as during colonial times. When countries exploit the resources of Africa today, the terms are set by the African nations and not by outsiders. The deals are mutually beneficial." India hopes that its capacity building, people-centric approach and efforts to build a sustainable partnership with Africa will keep such allegations at bay.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

India Sets Off For Naval Showdown With China





As if global geopolitics were not tempestuous enough, it seems China's increased military presence near Indian state-run explorer Oil and Natural Gas Corp's (ONGC) Nam Con Son basin operations near Vietnam are sparking India's navy into action. India's Navy Chief Joshi according to Reuters, said it was prepared to act, if necessary, to protect its maritime and economic interests in the region. He added that "When the requirement is there, for example, in situations where our country's interests are involved, for example ONGC... we will be required to go there and we are prepared for that." While the Straits of Hormuz seem to get most of the world's attention, the growing trouble in the South China Sea is troubling since it "is one of the most important international waterways and freedom of navigation there is an issue of utmost concern to India," because a large portion of India's trade is through the South China Sea. Noting that the modernization of China's Navy is "truly impressive", Joshi concluded:  "...are we preparing for it? Are we having exercises of that nature? The short answer is yes!" The Chinese are not making any friends as The Phillippines also condemned China's actions.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

A FLiNG Ain't What It Used To Be





There was a time when flings (insert personal contextual experience) used to be simple, impromptu, largely trivial things seeking instant gratification. That was until Shell's Floating Liquid Natural Gas facility, or FLiNG, came along: currently being built in the South Korean shipyards (largely unoccupied in the past several years after a surge in dry bulk container ship construction left the industry with a massive inventory glut and little demand for its precision engineering), this behemoth of a ship, measuring nearly half a kilometer in length, and displacing 600,000 tonnes of water, will be the world's largest offshore floating facility when deployed 200 km off the north-west coast of Australia in 2017 to process the recently discovered Prelude and Concerto gas fields. It will also likely revolutionize the field of Liquified Natural Gas extraction.

 

 
EconMatters's picture

WTI Crude Oil To Test $65 Level in 2013





Right now the world produces more Oil than it consumes each day, and it has for the past 16 months, this trend will only get worse in 2013.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Gundlach: "I'm Waiting For Something To Go Kaboom"





Following some well-timed 'suggestions' in Natural Gas and Apple this year, the new bond guru has some rather more concerning views about the future of America. Reflecting on a dismal outlook progressing due to the fact that "Retirees take resources from a society, and workers produce resources", Gundlach has cut his exposure to US equities (apart from gold-miners and NatGas producers) noting their expensive valuation and low potential for growth. In a forthcoming Bloomberg Markets interview, the DoubleLine CEO warns we are about to enter the ominous third phase of the current debacle (Phase 1: a 27-year buildup of corporate, personal and sovereign debt. That lasted until 2008, when Phase 2 started, unfettered lending finally toppled banks and pushed the global economy into a recession, spurring governments and central banks to spend trillions of dollars to stimulate growth) as deeply indebted countries and companies, which Gundlach doesn’t name, will default sometime after 2013. "I don’t believe you’re going to get some sort of an early warning," Gundlach warns "You should be moving now."

 
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