Newspaper

The Most Dangerous Fake News Of All Is Peddled By The Corporate Media

"This is not the sort of thing you see in a confident, brave, and civilized nation, it’s the sort of stuff you’d expect to see toward the end. It’s the stuff of craven war-mongers, of dishonest cowards, of a totally deranged and very dangerous media. The signs are everywhere; imperial decline is set to accelerate rapidly in the coming years."

Brazilian President Temer Officially Charged With Corruption

Just over a month after O Globo newspaper first brought the world's attention to the fact that Brazil's President Michel Temer was 'allegedly' involved in "hush money" payments, then vehemently denied by him; and just a week after the police confirmed it had evidence that Temer received bribes, O Globo, reports citing court documents, that President Michel Temer was formally charged with corruption by Prosecutor-General Rodrigo Janot.

If We Want "Unity"... Government Must Become Weaker

It is becoming increasingly clear that the United States is becoming a country in which every election brings a perceived mandate to forcefully - and even vengefully - impose the winning coalition's agenda on the losers...

Paul Craig Roberts Warns "The World Is Going Down With Trump"

"As the presstitute media is incapable of reason, I will do their job for them. I call for an immediate face-to-face meeting between Trump and Putin at Reykjavik. Cold War II, begun by Clinton, George W. Bush, and Obama, must be ended now."

Russia-Gate Flops As Democrats' Golden-Ticket

The national Democrats saw Russia-gate and the drive to impeach President Trump as their golden ticket back to power, but so far the ticket seems to be made of fool’s gold...

Brazilian Real Tumbles After Senate Rejects Landmark Labor Reform Bill

Brazil's landmark labor reform bill, intended to relax the country's restrictive labor laws and a main plank of embattled President Michel Temer's efforts to bolster investment and pull the economy out of its worst recession ever and widely seen as the country's second most important reform agenda after the Pension bill, was unexpectedly rejected by a special committee in Brazil's senate, with 10 votes against it, 9 in favor and 1 abstention.