Nicolas Sarkozy

Tyler Durden's picture

Preview Of The Boring Week Ahead





The upcoming week comes less loaded with policy events. The only major one is the Eurogroup meeting on Monday, however EU officials have already confirmed that no decision on the next Greek aid tranche will be made before the Troika’s next report on Greece’s adherence to the bailout conditions. Greece has scheduled an auction for Tuesday in order to roll over €3.1 bn in T-bills expiring by the end of the week. Additionally, in the US, the President has invited leadership of both parties for a first round of talks on the fiscal cliff. The data calendars also look lighter, with the publication of the FOMC minutes on Wednesday, and US Philly Fed on Thursday.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

As Thousands Of Italians March Against Austerity On "No Monti Day", Berlusconi Threatens To Scuttle Monti Government





First, it was Greece who failed to stick with the "do not rock the boat until the US election" script so meticulously crafted by Tim Geithner, and now it is Italy's turn as Europe threatens to come unhinged precisely in the week when complete peace and quiet is needed to avoid deflecting attention from the peak season of the US presidential theater. As Reuters reports, "Tens of thousands of people marched through Rome in a "No Monti Day" on Saturday, some throwing eggs and spraying graffiti to protest against austerity measures introduced by Prime Minister Mario Monti's government. Appointed in November when Italy risked being sucked into the euro zone debt crisis, Monti has pushed through painful austerity measures to cut the country's massive debt, including tax hikes, spending cuts and a pension overhaul. "We are here against Monti and his politics, the same politics as all over Europe, that brought Greece to its knees and that are destroying half of Europe, public schools, health care," said demonstrator Giorgio Cremaschi... In another demonstration in northern Italy, a small group of protesters scuffled with police near where Monti was addressing a rally on the theme of family values." So who gets to capitalize on the latest bout of surging discontent with the Goldman appointed technocrat? Why the same man who yesterday was sentenced to several years in jail (a sentence that will be never carried out of course), Silvio Berlusconi, and whom the ECB singlehandedly took down nearly a year ago, when it sent Italian bond yields to record highs: "The center-right bloc will decide "in the next few days" whether to withdraw confidence for Prime Minister Mario Monti in parliament or support him until elections in April, former Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi said on Saturday. Monti's government of non-elected technocrats is backed by the center-left, the center and the center-right. It would have to resign if it lost the support of the entire center-right."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Merkollande Becomes Merde





The most important alliance within the EU, the one that has ultimately defined the union's course over the past few decades, is the French-German axis. It appears that this is no longer the case. The once so strong friendship is in danger of fraying ever since the socialist Francois Hollande has become president of France. Not only was he elected on an 'anti austerity' platform (disguised as a 'pro growth' agenda, which is of course one of the most laughable misrepresentations ever),  it has turned out that his big-brother, anti-free market socialist agenda wasn't merely an electoral ploy to differentiate himself from Sarkozy. He actually means it. One thing is certain: the markets have not yet fully assimilated what is going on here.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: October 12





  • OECD: Japan Public Debt in 'Uncharted Territory' (WSJ)
  • Germany holds firm on Greece as IMF pressure mounts (Reuters)
  • Schäuble and Lagarde clash over austerity (FT) - it would be great if someone actually implemented austerity...
  • Merkel hints at tax cuts for growth boost (FT)
  • Hollande Robbed of Growth Engine as Companies Cut Investment (BBG)
  • Romney Narrows Gap With Obama in Swing State Polling (BBG)
  • Sluggish Growth Seen Into Next Year (WSJ)
  • Softbank Founder Has 300-Year Plan in Wooing Sprint Nextel (BBG)
  • Singapore Forgoes Currency Stimulus on Inflation Risk (Bloomberg) - as does China day after day
  • Sharp Jabs Dominate Combative Vice-Presidential Debate (WSJ)
  • Japan and China Agree to Hold Talks on Rift After Noda Call (Bloomberg)
 
testosteronepit's picture

A French Rebellion Against Unelected Bureaucrats: “European Coup D’Etat And Rape Of Democracy”





“The worst enemy of France and of all nations that aspire to prosperity and liberty.”

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: July 16





  • Looks like the troops won't be steamrolled: JPMorgan Blaming Marks On Traders Baffles Ex-Employees (Bloomberg)
  • The Goldman "Huddle" goes to Blackrock - Surveys Give Big Investors an Early View From Analysts (NYT)
  • At least housing has bottomed: London House Prices Plunge As Supply Rise Adds To Lull (Bloomberg)
  • Christine Lagarde and Nicolas Sarkozy embroiled in new corruption inquiry (Telegraph)- at least that fraud they created: Others helped them create it.
  • Heat Leaves Ranchers a Stark Option: Sell (NYT)
  • Merkel Gives No Ground on Demands for Oversight in Debt Crisis (Bloomberg)
  • The euro skeptics have the best lines again (FT)
  • Wen Says China’s Economic Recovery yet to Show Momentum (Bloomberg)
  • Europe’s Banks Face Tougher Demands (FT)
  • Madrid Region To Sell 100 Office Buildings Amid Austerity (Bloomberg)
  • China eases taxes for foreign companies (FT)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: July 4





  • Most Germans Reject Ceding Sovereignty to EU, Stern Poll Shows (Bloomberg)
  • How Stockton went broke: A 15-year spending binge (Reuters)
  • Manchester United Shoots for $100 Million IPO (WSJ)... with 4x leverage and Jefferies as underwriter
  • Iran says can destroy U.S. bases "minutes after attack" (Reuters)
  • Poison claims spark call for Arafat exhumation  (FT)
  • Diamond Would Be Catch for Investment, Private Equity (Bloomberg)
  • Investors may shun big Libor lawsuit and go it alone (Reuters)
  • New Particle Found, Consistent With Higgs Boson (WSJ)
  • Chinese riot police clash with protesters  (FT)
  • Euro-Area June Manufacturing, Services Output Contracts (Bloomberg)
  • Utilities Struggle to Restore Power in East (WSJ)
  • Dark economic clouds gather anew over Obama campaign (Reuters)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Former French President Sarkozy Home, Office Raided By Police





Things in broke Europe are becoming stranger by the minute. Stepping away from the Bank of England telling private institutions what to do, and overriding fiduciary responsibility, we now shift to France, but not in the context of the Second Great Socialist Revolution and its Fairness Doctrine annex, but to the home and office of ex-president Nicholas Sarkozy whose home and office where just raided according to Politique in connection with long-running allegations that his presidential campaign had been illegally funded by France's richest woman Lilliane Bettencourt. Do you see what happens Larry when there are no PACs and it is illegal for rich people to outright bribe politicians?

 
Phoenix Capital Research's picture

Germany Could Pull Out of the Euro Before Spain is Even "Saved"





Months ago, I forecast that Germany will walk before it goes “all in” on the EU to prop up everyone else. I believe that day is fast approaching. Unless Angela Merkel wants to commit political suicide, she will be forced to protect Germany’s domestic issues. Whether this comes as a result of Germany pre-emptively leaving the Euro or doing so after one of the PIIGS has already left remains to be seen. But in the end, Germany WILL WALK IF IT HAS TO.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

A Game Of Euro Chicken From The German Perspective: "Playing Until the Germans Lose Their Nerve"





"The next stage in the crisis will be blatant blackmail....

With their refusal to accept money from the bailout fund to recapitalize their banks, the Spanish are not far from causing the entire system to explode. They clearly figure that the Germans will lose their nerve and agree to rehabilitate their banks for them without demanding any guarantee in return that things will take a lasting turn for the better."

 
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