non-performing loans

Tyler Durden's picture

This Is How The IMF "Predicted" China's Slowdown

Over the past 5 years, the one forecast that was clear to anyone with even an introductory grasp of economics and finance, is that a Chinese economic collapse is inevitable and just a matter of time. Apparently, in retrospect, this was also clear to the head of the IMF, Christine Lagarde, who during a press conference in Lima, said the following:LAGARDE SAYS CHINA'S SLOWDOWN WAS PREDICTABLE, IS A "GOOD MOVE"  There is just one problem with that: of all market participants, the IMF is perhaps the only one who did not predict China's slowdown. Quite the opposite.

Tyler Durden's picture

China's "Credit Mystery" Deepens, As Moody's Warns On Shadow Financing

Are some Chinese banks ramping up their exposure to shadow conduits on the way to obscuring massive amounts of credit risk? Moody's says yes...

Tyler Durden's picture

Welcome To The Newer Normal: Your Complete Guide To A World In Which The Fed Is No Longer In Control

For those who have had the nagging feeling that something in the market has changed dramatically in the past few months, you are absolutely correct. Here is the full explanation.

Tyler Durden's picture

PBOC Devalues Yuan, Injects More Liquidity As China's Banking Regulator Admits "Bad Loan Situation Is More Severe Than 2008"

AsiaPac stocks are opening mixed after the US session gains. Perhaps the biggest news of the evening is, as China's bankiong regulator has been meeting with foreign banks to express concerns over lack of risk control around non-performing loans. As CBRC said, rather stunningly honest for a government entity, "the current situation is more severe than the time in 2008 during the financial crisis." With stocks up while commodities (Zinc) limit-down, PBOC injects another CNY50 bn and devalued the Yuan fix for the 2nd day in a row.

Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: September 15

  • China stocks resume sharp slide as economic worries mount (Reuters)
  • OECD head says sees further cut to global growth forecasts (Reuters)
  • The U.S. Dollar Is Gaining Like It's the 1980s — For Better or Worse (BBG)
  • Glencore Slumps to Record Low, Erasing Gains Since Debt Plan (BBG)
  • Woman killed, 400 homes destroyed by California wildfire (Reuters)
  • Why Morning Is the Worst Time to Trade Stocks (WSJ)
  • German Investor Confidence Damped by Weaker Emerging Markets (BBG)
Tyler Durden's picture

"There's Just No Cash" Oil Price Increase Will Not Come Fast Enough To Save Alberta

Bankers and borrowers have kicked the can down the road about as far as they can as more oilfield service (OFS) and exploration and production (E&P) companies default on their loans and seek more relief on lending covenants. While a significant oil price increase to lift all the sinking boats will surely come, it won’t happen soon enough. More of the same won’t work. Oil industry debt is everyday news. But the discussion is about the symptoms, not the ailment.

Tyler Durden's picture

Nomi Prins: Mexico, The Fed, & Counterparty Risk Concerns

This level of global inter-connected financial risk is hazardous in Mexico, where it’s peppered by high bank concentration risk. No one wants another major financial crisis. Yet, that’s where we are headed absent major reconstructions of the banking framework and the central bank policies that exude extreme power over global economies and markets, in the US, Mexico, and throughout the world. Mexico’s problems could again ripple through Latin America where eroding confidence, volatility, and US dollar strength are already hurting economies and markets. The difference is that now, in contrast to the 1980s and 1990s debt crises, loan and bond amounts have not just been extended by private banks, but subsidized by the Fed and the ECB.  The risk platform is elevated. The fall, for both Mexico and its trading partners like the US, likely much harder.

Tyler Durden's picture

Policy Confusion Reigns As China Caps Muni Debt, Uncaps Bank Debt, And Bad Loans Soar

In the latest example of Beijing attempting to deleverage and re-leverage all at once, China has lifted a cap on loan-to-deposit ratios for banks while simultaneously capping local government debt issuance for 2015. Meanwhile, bad loans are still on the rise at China's "big four" banks, underscoring the extent to which China's economy is rapidly deteriorating and drawing a line under the risk the PBoC is running by forcing banks to lend into an extraordinarily uncertain environment.

Tyler Durden's picture

Third Time's The Charm? Greece Agrees To Bailout Amid Rampant Skepticism

After what were described as "marathon" negotiations, Greece and its creditors have agreed to the terms of the country’s third bailout program. Although some remain optimistic, the general consensus seems to be that, as Finnish Foreign Minister Timo Soini said over the weekend, "we should just admit that this isn't going to work."

Tyler Durden's picture

The Unseen Consequences of Zero-Interest-Rate Policy

"But an increase in the quantity of money and fiduciary media will not enrich the world... Expansion of circulation credit does lead to a boom at first, it is true, but sooner or later this boom is bound to crash and bring about a new depression. Only apparent and temporary relief can be won by tricks of banking and currency. In the long run they must lead to an all the more profound catastrophe."

Tyler Durden's picture

Bad Debt Soars 35% In China As Government Set To Fabricate Dismal Loan Data

According to a transcript of an internal meeting of the China Banking Regulatory Commission, bad loans jumped CNY322.2 billion in H1 to CNY1.8 trillion, a 36% increase. Meanwhile, The PBoC will include loans made to CSF, China’s plunge protection vehicle, in its monthly loan data, meaning Beijing will pretend that the state-directed effort to artificially shore up the country’s stock market represents real, organic demand for credit.

Tyler Durden's picture

Greek Bank Stocks Crash Again Amid Fresh Signs Of Economic Disintegration

After trading limit-down on Monday when Greek stocks opened for trading for the first time since PM Alexis Tsipras called a referendum, shares of Greek banks once again flirted with the daily 30% loss limit on Tuesday as there were simply no bids for a set of institutions that everyone knows is insolvent. Meanwhile, Kathimerini reports that "the state’s losses from indirect taxes alone in the first couple of weeks of capital controls and the shuttering of banks [amounted to] more than half a billion euros."

Tyler Durden's picture

As China Admits It Lied About Its Local Debt Levels, Local Billionaires Are Quietly Liquidating Their Assets

Overnight something unexpected happened: Sheng Songcheng, the director of the statistics division of the People's Bank of China (PBOC), was quoted by the National Business Daily on Saturday whereby he essentially admitted China had been lying about not only its local debt exposure but the level of NPLs across the economy.  The punchline: Sheng warned about the risks of local government debt, saying that 2 trillion yuan in bond swaps may not be able to fully cover maturing debt, according to the report. What he really said, as paraphrased by Bloomberg, is that "local govt's tended to not report all their debts when audited in June 2013, thus the 2 trillion yuan debt swap plan arranged this year may not cover all debts due, Sheng cited as saying."


Tyler Durden's picture

Greek Capital Controls To Remain For Months As Germany Pushes For Bail-In Of Large Greek Depositors

With every passing day that Greece maintains its capital controls, the already dire funding situations is getting even worse, as Greek bank NPLs are rising with every day in which there is no normal flow of credit within the economy. This has led to a massive bank funding catch-22: the longer capital controls persist, the less confidence in local banks there is, the longer the bank run (capped by the ECB's weekly ELA allotment), the greater the ultimate bail out cost, and the greater the haircut of not only equity and debt stakeholders but also depositors.

Marc To Market's picture

Next Week in the Context of the Big Picture

The divergence theme is not longer being eclipsed by the Greek drama and the Chinese stock market slide.  See how this week's developments fit into the bigger picture.  

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