non-performing loans

Saving The System: Exposing The 4 Fallacies Of Modern Monetary Policy

Monetary policy, we are told, is all about staving off recession and stimulating economic growth. However, not only is monetary debasement in any form counterproductive and destroys the personal wealth of the masses, but the economists who devised today’s monetarism have completely lost their way. The real reason for today’s global monetary policies is an ultimately futile attempt to prevent a systemic and economic crisis.

The Full Details Behind Monte Paschi's €5 Billion Bail Out

  1. Increase the coverage ratio for Bad debt
  2. Transfer all the existing stock of Bad debt into a securitization vehicle. The senior tranche will be covered by government guarantees, Mezzanine will be bought by Atlante fund and the equity tranche will be transferred to existing shareholders and deconsolidated.
  3. A €5bn capital increase to remove the negative capital impact from the operation and maintain capital level at the current level of 11.8%.

Monte Paschi Fails European "Stress Test" Meant To Restore Confidence In Europe's Struggling Banks

Moments ago, the European Banking Authority published the 2016 bank stress test results, whose purpose - as every other year -  is to inspire confidence in Europe's struggling banks; it differs from a market-based assessment of bank stress - that particular "test" can be seen by observing the stock prices of such giant banks as Deutsche Bank and Credit Suisse, both of which recently hit all time lows. As previewed yesterday, Italy's 3rd largest, and most insolvent bank, Banca Monte di Siena was the worst performer in European regulators’ stress tests, and the only lender to have its capital wiped out in the exam. 

Italy Races To Arrange €5 Billion Bailout For Monte Paschi Before Friday's Stress Test

Italy is scrambling to secure a privately-backed bailout of Monte dei Paschi di Siena, the most exposed of the country’s troubled lenders, including a plan to raise €5bn of fresh capital so as to avert nationalisation, the FT reports. The bank needs to obtain some €5 bilion in capital ahead of Friday's stress test, or else a dire "contagion" scenario could unfold that could impair not only all Italian banks, but promptly spread first to France and then to Germany...

European Banks Soar As Draghi Hints At "Public Backstops"

If ever there was a reason for more European nations to 'exit' the sinking ship, Mario Draghi just spewed one. Having sent European bank stocks sliding with earlier calls for reforms, Draghi's wishful-thinking sent bank stocks soaring (especially Italian banks) after he noted a "public backstop is a measure that would be very useful and should be agreed with the Commission according to the existing rules." We can only imagine Herr Schauble's face when he heard this... and what about the Dijsselblom "template"?

"Janet Yellen Sounds Like A Fumbling Idiot No Matter What She Does"

"No matter what Alan Greenspan did he was taken as a genius. Whereas 20 years later, Janet Yellen sounds like a fumbling idiot no matter what she does. All her actions come across as desperate because the credibility has been blown away. The Fed has been forced into action and by being forced into action it has only highlighted what the Fed can’t do."

Could Italy Bring Down The Euro?

"A perfect storm of slow or zero Italian economic growth, low interest rates and politically connected, often corrupt, lending have combined to create a situation where the Italian financial system is in need of a large rescue."

Eurogroup Head Dashes Italy Bank Bailout Hopes: "I Will Resist Taxpayer Bailouts Very Strongly"

Jeroen Dijsselbloem poured cold water on Italy's ongoing attempts to force a bank bailout when he said earlier today that not only was he not "particularly" worried about italian banks but that “there have always been and will always be bankers that say ’we need more public money to recapitalize our banks.... and I will resist that very strongly because it is, again and again, hitting on the taxpayer." He then added that "the problems with the banks need to be sorted out in the banks and by banks.”