• Tim Knight from...
    12/21/2014 - 09:37
    The five remaining equity bears on Earth are all saying the same thing: "We'll get 'em in 2015." To which I ask: why? What's going to change?

People's Bank Of China

Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: September 5





  • BOE Leaves Policy Unchanged as Carney’s Guidance Assessed (BBG)
  • Surprise or not, U.S. strikes can still hurt Assad (Reuters)
  • Samsung Gear: A Smartwatch in Search of a Purpose (BusinessWeek)
  • 'Jumbo' Mortgage Rates Fall Below Traditional Ones  (WSJ)
  • Capital Unease Again Bites Deutsche Bank  (WSJ)
  • Technical snafus confuse charges for Obamacare plans (Reuters)
  • JPMorgan subject of obstruction probe in energy case (Reuters)
  • U.S. Car Sales Soar to Pre-Slump Level (WSJ) - i.e., to just when the market crashed
  • BoJ lifts assessment of Japan’s economic health (FT)
  • Dead Dog in Reservoir Helps Drive Venezuelans to Bottled Water (BBG)
  • Russia Boosts Mediterranean Force as U.S. Mulls Syria Strike (BBG)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: August 16





  • Critics Decry Risks Posed by Link Between China's Banks and Bonds (WSJ)
  • U.S. retailers say uneven recovery keeps consumers cautious (Reuters) - er, what recovery?
  • Easy Credit Dries Up, Choking Growth in China (NYT)
  • Fed's Bullard Floats Idea of Small Cuts to Bond Buying (WSJ)
  • EU wants one definition of bad loans for bank tests (Reuters) - because in Europe they can't even agree what an NPL is...
  • Nagasaki Bomb Maker Offers Lessons for Fukushima Cleanup (BBG)
  • With Gmail Overhaul, Not All Mail Is Equal (WSJ)
  • Snowden downloaded NSA secrets while working for Dell, sources say (Reuters)
  • Apollo co-founder buys into New Jersey Devils (FT)
  • Republicans to vote on debate boycott because of Clinton programs (Reuters)
  • J.C. Penney Heads for Ninth Quarter of Plunging Sales (BBG)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Asian Fat Finger Roils An Otherwise Boring Overnight Session





Starting with the Asian markets this morning, it appear the roller coaster ride for markets continued overnight. Asian equities started the day trading weaker but shortly after the open though, all of Asia bounced off the lows following the previously noted surge in Chinese A-shares soaring more than 5% in a matter of minutes in what was initially described as a potential “fat finger” incident. As DB notes, alternative explanations ranged from a potential restructuring of the government’s holdings in some listed companies, to market buying ahead of a rate cut this coming weekend. All indications point toward a fat finger. The A-share spike has managed to drag other indices along with it though some gains have been pared. Yet for all the drama the Shanghai Composite soared... and then closed red. The region’s underperformer is the Nikkei (-0.75%). Elsewhere, the NZDUSD dropped 0.5% after a magnitude 6.8 earthquake struck the city of Wellington this morning. Looking at the US S&P500 futures are trading modestly higher at 1660. Looking ahead to today there is very little in the way of Tier 1 data to be expected. Housing starts/permits from the US and the preliminary UofM Consumer Sentiment reading for August are the main reports. The moves in rates and perhaps oil will probably offer some markets some directional cues.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Overnight News Not Terrible Enough To Assure New All Time Highs





While the market's eyes were fixed on the near record slide in Japanese Industrial Production (even as its ears glazed over the latest commentary rerun from Aso) which did however lead to a 1.53% jump in the PenNikkeiStock market on hope of more stimulus to get floundering Abenomics back on track, the most important news from the overnight session is that the PBOC's love affair with its own tapering may have come and gone after the central bank came, looked at the surge in 7 day market repo rates, and unwilling to risk another mid-June episode where SHIBOR exploded to the mid-25% range, for the first first time since February injected RMB17 billion through a 7-day reverse repo. The PBOC also announced it would cut the RRR in the earthquake-hit Lushan area. And with that the illusion of a firm and resolute PBOC is shattered, however it did result in a tiny 0.7% bounce in the SHCOMP.

 
GoldCore's picture

China’s Yuan Set To Become Global Reserve Currency With Gold Backing?





According to media reports, the People's Bank of China is considering phasing out the dollar as the reference currency or peg for the yuan, and to start using gold as the reference point.

The reports have not been confirmed officially, but there has been official comments to that effect in recent years and Chinese academics have advocated backing the renminbi or yuan with gold.

Beijing's possible move to back the yuan with gold would be a strategic move in order to, lessen the risk of inflation, increase the yuan’s attractiveness as an investment medium and create faith in the yuan as a reserve currency.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Why China's "Interest Rate Liberalization" Is Much Ado About Nothing





One of the catalysts driving the Friday rally in stocks was news from the PBOC that China was pushing forward with liberalization of its "interest rate controls" by removing the lending rate floor. Back then we asked, rhetorically, that "besides optics, because China does not have a market clearing interest rate so this announcement is largely moot, will this announcement have an actual impact on Chinese lending or transmission mechanisms? Hardly." As SocGen lays out today, "Hardly" was indeed the accurate answer: "Although the step is of great significance, the near term impact is likely to be very limited."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

PBOC Scraps Lending Rate Floor In "Full Liberalization" Of Interest Rate Controls





The PBOC just announced that China will scrap its bank lending rate floor and controls on bill discount rate. It will also allow banks to set lending rate based on commercial preinciples with a goal of promoting economic restructuring. China will continue differentiated lending policies for housing sector and will leave unchanged lending floating rates for home buyers.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Days Of The Super-Powered Chinese Economy Are Over





Last week's liquidity crunch and market panic is a reminder that Beijing is playing a difficult game. Regardless of what happens next, the consensus expectations that China's economy will grow at roughly 7 percent over the next few years can be safely ignored. Growth driven by consumption, instead of trade and investment, is alone sufficient to grow China's GDP by 3 to 4 percent annually. But it is not clear that consumption can be sustained if investment growth levels are sharply reduced. If Beijing can successfully manage the employment consequences of decreased investment growth, perhaps it can keep consumption growing at current levels. But that's a tricky proposition. It's likely that the days of the super-powered Chinese economy are over. Instead, Beijing must content itself with grinding its way through the debt that has accumulated over the past decade.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

PBOC Head To "Address Liquidity At Proper Time" Even As China's Bad Loan Giant Awakes





In the aftermath of the record cash crunch in the Chinese interbank market, many financial institutions in China and abroad have been hoping that the PBOC would either end its stance of aloof detachment or at least break its vow of silence and if not act then at a minimum promise good times ahead. Alas, despite repeated confusion in various press reports that it has done that, it hasn't aside from the occasional "behind the scenes" bank bailout. And at today's Lujiazui Financial Forum, PBOC governor Zhou Xiaochuan kept the status quo saying the central bank will adjust liquidity "at the proper time to ensure market stability." That time, however, is not now.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Goldman On China: 'Sufficient' Liquidity But Tightening Bias To Stay





The People's Bank of China (PBOC) released an official statement addressing directly the latest liquidity conditions in the banking system and indicating that the central bank intends to maintain sufficient liquidity conditions in the interbank market. As Goldman notes, this clear communication of policy intentions is highly important to guide market expectations, avoid liquidity hoarding, and contain excessive volatility of market. While they hope this calms markets in coming days, Goldman notes that the interbank rates are likely to settle back to a level higher than before to rein in leverage growth. However, in a helpful prompt for more jawboning, the squid notes, continued communications on policy intentions and actions will be helpful to further ease market uncertainties, given the extreme volatility in recent weeks; though we note the tightening bias will remain as the new leadership appears to prefer to take their pain early (and blame previous parties) than wait.

 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: June 26





  • Scalpel in Hand, Chinese Premier Li Stirs Reform Hopes (Reuters)
  • Obama Sets Conditions for Keystone Pipeline Go-Ahead (FT)
  • World’s Most Indebted Households Face Rate Pain (BBG)
  • SAC Probers Weighing 'Willful Blindness' Tack (WSJ)
  • Draghi Says ECB Ready to Act, Calls for Investment Over Tax (BBG)
  • U.S. Tops China for Foreign Investment (WSJ)
  • Basel Presses Ahead With Plans to Limit Bank Borrowing (FT)
  • Gillard Ousted as Australia PM by Rival Rudd (FT)
  • Japan Economic Strength Will Show in Stocks, Nishimura Says (BBG)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

China Is Now More Capitalist Than The US: Main Communist Mouthpiece Says Bailouts Are Bad





Given the earlier rumors of PBOC bailing out the funding markets (followed rapidly by their actual denial/explanation of what is going on which is much less supportive than an exuberantly bouncing market implies), it is perhaps ironic that the nation's government mouthpiece - The People's Daily - explains that help is not coming:

A bailout of the stock market is not beneficial to the development of a sound capital market, although some analysts are suggesting the China Securities Regulatory Commission and the People's Bank of China should intervene

Indeed; it seems the Communist party did learn something about the failures of the US' version of Capitalism and the snowballing impacts of bailout-based unintended consequences.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: June 25





  • Here come the rolling blackouts: Obama takes on power plant emissions as part of climate plan (Reuters)
  • Walking Back Bernanke Wished on Too Much Information (BBG)
  • As previewed last week: Bridgewater "All Weather" is Mostly Cloudy, down 8% YTD (Reuters)
  • U.S. Said to Explore Possible China Role in Snowden Leaks (BBG)
  • Coeure Says No Doubt ECB Loose Monetary Policy Exit Distant (Bloomberg)... so a "recovery", but not at all
  • U.S. steps up pressure on Russia as Snowden stays free (Reuters)
  • Texas' Next Big Oil Rush: New Pipelines Ferrying Landlocked Crude Expected to Boost Gulf Coast Refiners (WSJ)
  • Singapore Offsets Bankers as Vacancies Fall (BBG)
  • Asian Stocks Fall as China Sinks Deeper Into Bear Market (BBG), European Stocks Rally With Bonds as Metals Advance (BBG)
  • Qatar emir hands power to son, no word on prime minister (Reuters)
 
Pivotfarm's picture

Chinese Banks Ready to Go Bust





Dive! Take cover! Or, at least, hold on to your pants in the scramble. The Chinese bubble has just burst. It looks like the world is going to have egg on its face and elsewhere as Chinese banks are scrambling to get the hands on cash.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: June 17





  • Obama prepares for chilly talks with Putin over Syria (Reuters)
  • G8 opens amid dispute on Syria arms (FT)
  • Economists Blame Fed for Higher Bond Yields (WSJ) - wait... what? Isn't the "stronger economy" to blame?
  • What a novel concept - In the Czech Republic, a spying scandal has forced the PM to resign (BBG)
  • Rigged-Benchmark Probes Proliferate From Singapore to UK (BBG)
  • Economists Wary as Fed's Next Forecast Looms  (Hilsenleak)
  • Banks Balk at New Rules for Small Loans (WSJ)
  • Sporadic clashes in Turkey as Erdogan asserts authority (Reuters)
 
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