Precious Metals

Tyler Durden's picture

Is Hong Kong-US Dollar Link About To End? HKMA Buys $715 Million To Support Peg





Yesterday saw something quite unusual in the New York trading session. The Hong Kong Monetary Authority bought $715 million (selling HKD) in the FX markets to manage its currency peg, injecting the money into the banking system (and expanding its balance sheet) to prevent HKD from rising above its permitted range. HKMA projects its balance sheet to grow to the end of July, but as Simon Black (of Sovereign Man blog) notes, this could well be the start of a bigger shift - an end to the US Dollar peg..."The US is no longer the undisputed superpower it once was. The US dollar is dragging them down. Hong Kong is easily strong enough to stand on its own."

 
GoldCore's picture

Silver Manipulation To End In Default; $150 Per Ounce Possible - Video





Manipulation of the silver market was covered in a just released ‘Get REAL’ Special on Silver. Key topics discussed in the interview include * The fix is in: Old boys, pints of beer, big cigars and top hats, * the risk of manipulation through HFT, computer trading and ‘dark pools,' * “Meet the new boss; same as the old boss,'  * The importance of owning allocated and especially segregated silver

 
Tyler Durden's picture

"London Fix" Gold Rigging By Bullion Bank Exposed In Class Action Lawsuit: The Complete Charts





While the allegations in the lawsuit are well-known to frequent (and all other) readers of Zero Hedge, we recommend reading the full filing as it explains in clear English just what the fixing process worked. Perhaps what is more interesting are the abnormalities in the price of gold as highlighted by Derksen, which clearly show the critical role the daily fix has in the manipulation of the price of gold, both in a downward and upward (mostly downward) direction: whichever suits the London Fix member banks.

 
GoldCore's picture

Singapore Takes More Steps To Becoming Global Gold Hub





Singapore’s plans to become a gold and precious metals hub took a key step on Thursday. Jim Rogers, Jim Sinclair and Marc Faber have extolled the virtues of owning physical coins and bars in Singapore. “Individuals are making a mistake if they’re holding all their assets in one country.…I still have the majority of my gold in Switzerland, but I am already moving gold to Asia,” Faber recently said.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Futures Dragged Down By Visa, Amazon Despite USDJPY Levitation





Following yesterday's disappointing results by Visa, which is the largest DJIA component accounting for 8% of the index and which dropped nearly 3%, while AMZN's 10% tumble has weighed heavily on NASDAQ futures, it has been up to the USDJPY to push US equity futures from dropping further, which it has done admirably so far with the tried and true levitation pump taking place just as Europe opened. One thing to keep in mind: yesterday the CME quietly hiked ES and NQ margins by 6% and 11% respectively. A modest warning shot across the bow of what may be coming down the line?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Bonds & Bullion Tumble As Stocks Stumble On Macro Weakness





Treasury yields pushed 4-5bps higher on the day - the worst in 3 weeks - as yesterday's test of 2014 lows saw some reactive bond-selling. Asian and EU PMIs sent stocks to record-er highs but absymal US PMI and housing data took the shine off the exuberance early on (despite the best efforts at a 5th short-squeeze ramp at the open in a row). AUDJPY was in charge of stocks once again helping the S&P desperatly cling to unchanged. Espirito Santo bankruptcy headlines stumbled stocks at around 1300ET (but that dip was bought). The USD rose modestly (now up almost 0.5% on the week) led by GBP and EUR weakness but that was nothing compared to the dumpfest in precious metals. Silver's worst day in 6 months and a big drop in gold retraced them to near June FOMC levels. Credit markets continue to diverge bearishly from stocks (now 30bps wider than the tights as stocks rally to new highs). Despite the ubiquitous late-day ramp, stocks ended the day mixed around unchanged (and VIX higher on the day). By the close the S&P 500 closed +0.045% to a new all-time-record high.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Silver Tumbles Most In 6 Months





Silver is down almost 3% today - its biggest drop since the end of January as precious metals both tumble back towards pre-June-FOMC levels. News on China demand appears to be the main catalyst according to desk chatter (as well as a break through the key 50-day and 100-day moving-averages) with gold testing down to its 200-day moving average at $1286.

 
GoldCore's picture

‘Apocalypse’ Krugman Ignores History, Keynes And Lenin’s Warnings





When it comes to the apocalypse, Krugman likes to have his apocalyptic cake and eat it too. Krugman says that the recent concern about “debts and deficits” was a “false alarm.” He attempts to paint those who were concerned about the debt crisis as scare mongers. He sarcastically says that “the debt apocalypse has been called off.”

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Overnight Futures Levitation Mode Engaged But Subdued





Despite yesterday's lackluster earnings the most recent market levitation on low volume was largely due to what some considered a moderation in geopolitical tensions after Europe once again showed it is completely incapable of stopping Putin from dominating Europe with his energy trump card, and is so conflicted it is even unable to impose sanctions (despite the US prodding first France with BNP and now Germany with the latest DB revelations to get their act together), as well as it being, well, Tuesday, today's moderate run-up in equity futures can likely be best attributed to momentum algos, which are also rushing to recalibrate and follow the overnight surge in the AUDJPY while ignoring any drifting USDJPY signals.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Stocks Desperate To Put Ukraine In Rearview Mirror But More Russian Sanctions Loom





Following the overnight ramp in various JPY crosses (dragging equity futures higher, and the Nikkei up 0.8%) it is as if the market is desperate to put all of last week's geopolitical events in the rearview mirror, and while yesterday there were no economic events of note, today's CPI and existing home prints should provide at least some distraction from the relentless barrage of one-line updates on Ukraine and Gaza. Still, that is precisely where the biggest risk remains, with an emphasis on the possibility of more Russian sanctions, this time by Europe.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Quiet Economic Calendar Means All Attention Focused On Ukraine And Gaza





In the absence of any major economic events, it will be another day tracking geopolitical headlines out of Ukraine (lots of accusations, propaganda and fingerpointing on both sides, zero actual evidence and facts - expect more European sanctions to be announced today to match last week's latest US-led round ) and Israel (where the death toll has now risen over 500, almost entirely on the Gaza side), and then promptly spinning any bad news as great news. For now, however, futures are modestly lower from the Friday close pushed down by the AUDJPY which has rebased around 95.00. We expect the momentum ignition correlation algos will promptly take of that as soon as the US market opens, a market which has now been described as bubbly by the BIS, the Fed and the IMF.

 
smartknowledgeu's picture

MH17: For Bankers, Every Crisis and Tragedy is an Opportunity to Manufacture Profits





August gold GCQ14 and September silver SIU14 contract purchases spiked the exact moment Malaysia Airlines reported MH17 missing. Coincidence or tragedy profiteering? You decide.

 
GoldCore's picture

India Sees Gold Imports Surge 65% In June





The sell off was greeted by Chinese buyers as Chinese premiums edged up to just over $1 an ounce on the Shanghai Gold Exchange (SGE).

Gold price drops this year have led to a marked increase in demand for gold as seen in very large increases in ETF holdings (See chart - Orange is Gold, Purple is absolute change in gold ETF holdings). The smart money in Asia, the West and globally continues to use price dips as an opportunity to allocate to gold.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Robbing Peter





“A government that robs Peter to pay Paul can always depend on the support of Paul.” – George Bernard Shaw

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Financial Markets — Rated "R"





Financial markets are complex in normal times. When government is actively supporting them, they only become more so and more dangerous. If today’s financial markets were rated like movies, they would be rated “R” (perhaps, “X”). Whether the “R” stands for risky or restricted is immaterial.

 
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