Precious Metals

David Rosenberg: "This Market Makes No Sense"

"Long bonds, short the Fed funds futures. Long equities but long bonds. Long gold but long equities. Long the dollar and long the precious metals. It is next to impossible to make sense out of this; I’m not even sure Graham or Dodd could if they were still alive."

Frontrunning: August 10

  • World stocks hit one-year peak, dollar sags on weak U.S. data (Reuters)
  • Trump's remarks on gun rights, Clinton unleash torrent of criticism (Reuters)
  • Newly Released Emails Highlight Clinton Foundation’s Ties to State Department (WSJ)
  • One-in-five U.S. Republicans want Trump to drop out: Reuters/Ipsos poll (Reuters)
  • Soaring Debt Has U.S. Companies as Vulnerable to Default as 2008 (BBG)
  • BOJ to defend QQE in Sept policy assessment (Reuters)

The Charade Continues: London Gold And Silver Markets Set For Even More Paper Trading

Today the London Metal Exchange (LME) and the World Gold Council (WGC) jointly announced the launch next year of standardised gold and silver spot and futures contracts which will trade on the LME’s electronic platform LMESelect, will clear on the LME central clearing platform LME Clear, and that will be settled ‘loco London’. Together these new products will be known as LMEprecious.’

Gold & Silver Bounce Back From Payrolls Plunge

The chaotic plungefest in precious metals following Friday's payrolls print is starting to unwind as today's dismal productivity sparks gold and silver buying as Fed tightening expectations tumble...

S&P To Open At New Record High As Commodities Rise, China Trade Disappoints

The meltup continues with the S&P500 set to open at new all time highs as futures rise 0.2% overnight, with European, Asian stocks higher, as job data pushed MSCI Asia Pacific Index towards highest close since Aug. 2015. Germany, U.K. economic data seen positive, with dollar, oil rising, and gold declining. The MSCI All-Country World Index rose 0.4% and was headed for its highest close in almost a year.

Musical Chairs

Economics is a bit like musical chairs. In a recession, the economy takes a hit and there are some casualties. Some players fail to get a chair in time and are out of the game. The game then goes on without them. The economy eventually recovers. But a depression is a different game entirely...