Quantitative Easing

US Futures, European Stocks Rebound, Bonds Fall Ahead Of US Data Deluge

The overnight session started with more weakness out of Asia, where chatter that the BOJ may end up doing nothing despite all the trial balloons (as we hinted yesterday), sent the USDJPY sliding, pushing the Nikkei lower, leading to a 7th consecutive decline in the Topix, the longest such stretch since 2014 even though the BOJ is now actively buying a record amount of ETFs. However, the modest dip in S&P futures and European stocks proved too much for BTFD algos, and risk promptly rebounded.

Global Market Rout Abates As Bond Selloff Pauses, Oil Rebounds

After a sudden rout in financial markets that wiped $2 trillion in global market cap over the past week showed signs of easing, overnight stocks tried to stage another "BTFD-type" comeback with European stocks climbing for the first time in five days as oil and metals prices gained. S&P futures were modestly in green, although they faded earlier gains, on the back of a slide in the USDJPY which initially spiked to 103.31 only to fade back to the mid 102-range.

"You Will Be Poor"

How much of your wealth does the government want? How much do you have?

"The Financial Crisis Has Morphed Into A Growth Crisis" - Rogoff Warns "Cash Is Not Forever, It's A Curse"

"Big bills are a curse... understand this: Cash is not forever... in fifty years there will be no cash... it’s one very important step towards enabling central banks to have much more effective tools in fighting a financial crisis and in particular to use negative interest rates in an effective way... people who are older need to think about having a larger share of stocks than the traditional wisdom..."

"It's Never Different This Time" PIMCO Warns "The Tides Of Risk Will Flow Eventually"

The old Wall Street expression is “They don’t ring a bell at the top.” This snarky adage is usually employed by those saddened financial managers who ride a successful investment to a peak and then watch in horror as it reverses course to a level below their cost basis. A pity this notion is misguided, since the market frequently “rings the bell.” It is just that most market participants are not listening. Perhaps they should be listening now.

"It Ain't Working" - Axel Merk Lashes Out At The Fed's Failed Inflationary Focus

It ain't working. Eight years after the outbreak of the financial crisis, central bank chiefs suggest they have saved the world, but have they? We argue central banks have become part of the problem, not the solution. At its core, their indoctrinated focus on inflation may well do more harm than good, with potentially perilous implications for investors.

Cross-Asset "Contagion" Risk Indicator Worse Than Lehman

Nowhere else is the impact of central banks more evident than the total decoupling of global stock markets from global economic developments. However, as money managers attempt to diversify away from what they all know will not end well, Credit Suisse warns the overwhelming flow from central bank interventions "are driving everything" pushing their so-called cross-market contagion indicator to levels more worrisome than anytime since 2008's Lehman-inspired financial crisis.

With All Eyes On The ECB, Catatonic Global Markets Remain In State Of Near Paralysis

As the market's comatose trading range continues with no notable moves for nearly 40 consecutive days, there is some hope volatility may return after today's main event, the ECB's announcement due in just two hours, when Mario Draghi may surprise the market in either direction. As of today, the S&P500 has held in a band of 1.5% for 39 days, the narrowest ever for that length of time.

What Wall Street Expects From The ECB, And How Will The Market React

With the ECB running dangerously low on bonds to monetize even as its QE program has failed to spur inflation, Mario Draghi may have no choice but to unveil drastic changes to the central bank's QE programm tomorrow. Here are the options available to the central banker, and some ideas of how markets may react.