ratings

Are We Witnessing The Weirdest Moment In Economic History?

"If you thought 2016 was weird, I suggest you get comfortable with the surreal because it is not going away anytime soon. 2017 is a veritable treasure trove of falling elevators... it seems to me that many of these events, stacked so closely together in the next few weeks, are not coincidental in their timing."

New Poll Shows Hillary Favorability Sinking to All-Time Low As Trump Jumps

After a recent speech at here alma mater, Wellesley College, Hillary Clinton was asked by a young snowflake what she would change about her 2016 campaign if she had it to do all over again, to which she quickly responded, "I'd win."  But a new poll from Suffolk University reveals that her innovative strategy, while genius, may be misinformed.

Only In Cali - Strip Poker Playing Ex-Mayor Stole Money From Kids Programs To Fund Filipino Fetish

Anthony Silva, the former Mayor of Stockton, California who we previously noted was arrested for playing strip poker with teenagers, is now facing a litany of new charges alleging that he stole hundreds of thousands of dollars from the Boys and Girls Club of Stockton to fund, among other things, trips to the Philippines and monthly payments to the dating site filipinocupid.com

Venezuela Is Down To Its Last $10B As Debt Payments Loom

Venezuela’s financial report for 2016 stated that roughly $7.7 billion of the remaining $10.5 billion in foreign reserves had been preserved in gold. Last year, in order to fulfill debt obligations, Caracas began shipping gold to Switzerland.

The US Warms Up To Trump: 3 In 4 Americans Approve Of Trump Address

In a new poll from CNN/ORC, more than 75% of Americans reacted positively to Trump's Tuesday night "Presidential" address to Congress with 57% reacting "very positively."  That said, CNN was quick to point out that Trump's "very positive" rating fell well below Obama's 68% rating in his first address to a join session of Congress in 2009.

How We Got Here In One Sentence

In every annual budget debate since the 1980s, one side figures out that the way to get what it wants – which is higher spending – is to frame the request in a particular, ingenious way: We have to borrow and spend way more now if we want to borrow and spend way less later.