Recession

Greenspan: "This Is The Worst Period I Recall; There's Nothing Like It"

"This is the worst period, I recall since I've been in public service. There's nothing like it, including the crisis — remember October 19th, 1987, when the Dow went down by a record amount 23 percent? That I thought was the bottom of all potential problems. This has a corrosive effect that will not go away. I'd love to find something positive to say."

Which US Companies And Sectors Have The Most Exposure To Brexit

At the company level, 30 companies in the S&P 500 have revenue exposure of more than 10% to the United Kingdom, led by Newmont Mining (64%), Molson Coors Brewing (34%), and PPL Corporation (31%). At the sector level, the Energy (6.4%), Information Technology (4.0%), and Materials (3.7%) sectors have the highest revenue exposures to the United Kingdom.

Durable Goods Orders Crater In May - Longest Non-Recessionary Slump In American History

Durable Goods Orders cratered 2.2% in May, drastically below -0.5% expectations - the worst since Feb. The entire data series disappointed with unexpected declines in Durables Ex-Transports and non-defense orders and shipments. However this is now the 17th month in a row of YoY Core Durable Goods declines, something that has never happened without a US economic recession being present.

Central Bankers Around The Globle Scramble To Defend Markets: BOE Pledges $345BN; ECB, Others Promise Liquidity

There was a reason why we warned readers two days ago that "The World's Central Bankers Are Gathering At The BIS' Basel Tower Ahead Of The Brexit Result": simply enough, it was to facilitate an immediate response when a worst-cased Brexit vote hit. And that is precisely what has happened today in the aftermath of the historic British decision to exit the EU.  It started, as one would expect, with Mark Carney who said the Bank of England is ready to pump billions of pounds into the financial system as he stands at the front line of Britain’s defense against a Brexit-provoked market crisis.

"I've Never Felt So Resigned To The Fact That We Are All Stuck..."

"I’ve never felt so ... resigned ... to the fact we are ALL well and truly stuck. The Fed is stuck. The ECB and the BOJ are stuck. The banks are stuck. Corporations are stuck. Asset managers are stuck. Financial advisors are stuck. Investors are stuck. Republicans are stuck. Democrats are stuck. We are all stuck in a very powerful political equilibrium where the costs of changing our current bleak course of ineffective monetary policy and counter-productive regulatory policy are so astronomical that The Powers That Be have no alternative but to continue with what they know full well isn’t working."

The Fed's 3rd Mandate & The Value Of Cash

Jan 2008: Bernanke "The Federal Reserve is not currently forecasting a recession." Jun 2008: Bernanke "The risk that the economy has entered a substantial downturn appears to have diminished." Jun 2016: Yellen "chances of recession this year are 'quite low'... The U.S. economy is doing well. My expectation is that the U.S. economy will continue to grow." Channelling Bernanke?

Stress Test 2016: Fed Says All 33 Banks Can Surive 70 VIX Without Needing Outside Capital

While hardly coming as a surprise to anyone, moments ago the Fed announced that all 33 banks have enough capital to withstand a severe economic shock, though Morgan Stanley trailed the rest of Wall Street in a key measure of leverage, Bloomberg reports. The biggest bank cleared the most severe scenario handily, with the exception of Morgan Stanley whose projected 4.9% leverage ratio tied for last place alongside a Canadian bank’s U.S. unit, falling within a percentage point of the 4 percent minimum. As a result of today's "test result" many banks will likely win regulators' approval next week to boost dividends.

The British Referendum And The Long Arm Of The Lawless

The true fear lies with those who stand to lose the most, in this case the countries who hold the Euro currency together with the thinnest of threads. As Britons head to the polling booths, they should hold their heads high, rightly insulted at the feigned notion that the UK cannot stand on its own. After all, much of the civilized world we take for granted today is rooted in the British rule of law.

Is Soros Wrong?

"There is an argument that a Brexit might look similar to the aftermath of sterling?s ignominious exit from the ERM on ?Black Wednesday? 16 September 1992. In a current environment where central banks and governments have failed to generate a strong enough economic recovery to normalise interest rates amid persistent deflationary pressures, one would have thought a substantial decline in one?s currency would be welcomed ?- for that is one way to inject a modicum of inflation back into the economic system."