Recession

Tyler Durden's picture

When Perfect "There Can't Be A Recession" Indicators Fail





This is it! The holy grail of forecasting, Jeffrey Kleintop has discovered it. You'll never have to worry about actual earnings reports, a massive bubble in junk debt, the sluggishness of the economy, new record levels in sentiment measures and margin debt, record low mutual fund cash reserves, the pace of money supply growth, or anything else again. Just watch the yield curve! Unfortunately, as we showed here in the US, this advice could turn out to be extremely dangerous for one's financial health - and has been across many nations throughout time.  People remain desperate for excuses as to why the latest bit of asset boom insanity will never end

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: If Only The U.S. Had Stayed Out Of World War I





The first big wave of embracing a liberal international economic order - relatively free trade, rising international capital flows and rapidly growing global economic integration - resulted in something remarkable. Between 1870 and 1914, there was a 45-year span of rising living standards, stable prices, massive capital investment and prolific technological progress. In terms of overall progress, these four-plus decades have never been equaled — either before or since. Then came the Great War. It involved a scale of total industrial mobilization and financial mayhem that was unlike any that had gone before. In the case of Great Britain, for example, its national debt increased 14-fold.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Is It Time To Sell The "Old Guy At A Club" Market?





It’s time to think like a contrarian. Why? Because capital markets seem as bulletproof as one of those up-armored military personnel carriers you see in war zones. So what could really rattle stock, bond and commodity markets over the next 3-6 months? The go-to answer, steeped in history, is geopolitical crisis, where the logical hedges are precious metals, volatility plays, and possibly crude oil. Look deeper, however, and other answers emerge.

 
testosteronepit's picture

Gallup Slams Lid On Hopes for US Economy





Consumers are “straining against rising prices on daily essentials” and are cutting back on things they want to buy.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

... In Which SocGen Starts A Rumor That The Next QE Will Come From China





The US is tapering, with the Fed knowing any further monetization of private sector bonds will lead to a crash in the already illiquid bond market; Japan is stuck with its massive QE, jawboning every day a rumor that first appeared in November of 2013 (and which sent the USDJPY 500 pips higher and has so far been nothing but a lie) that it may do more, but has unleashed such a firestorm of imported inflation, plunging real wages and collapsing exports that there is nothing Abe or Kuroda can do to boost the Nikkei "wealth effect" or halt what now appears an almost certain 2014 recession.  Europe, too, saw a rumor emerge in November 2013 that it would also launch QE, however it won't: instead the ECB just went NIRP and is threatening to do ABS purchases, which just like the OMT pipedream will never happen simply because there aren't enough unencumbered assets to monetize (most of which are already have liens with local banks) while an outright QE would require redrafting Article 123. So what is a world starved for "outside money" to do? Why make up another rumor, this time focusing on the last possible source of QE: China.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Polar Vortex Is Back... In The Middle Of July





just to make sure that the abysmal Q1 GDP which has now spilled over into Q2 and will likely see the US economy growing in the mid-2% range, has a sufficiently broad "excuse" in the third quarter of the year, here comes - in the middle of July - the polar vortex 2.0.  As WaPo reports, "However you choose to refer to the looming weather pattern, unseasonably chilly air is headed for parts of the northern and northeastern U.S at the height of summer early next week."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Bubbles, Bubbles Everywhere





Is there any doubt that we are living in a bubble economy? At this moment in the United States we are simultaneously experiencing a stock market bubble, a government debt bubble, a corporate bond bubble, a bubble in San Francisco real estate, a farmland bubble, a derivatives bubble and a student loan debt bubble. And of course similar things could be said about most of the rest of the planet as well. And when these current financial bubbles in America burst, the pain is going to be absolutely enormous.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Time For Regime Change At The Eccles Building: Interest Rate Pegging Is Destroying Capitalism





Maybe its time for a new version of the old regime at the Fed. That is, for the Eccles Building to eschew interest rate-pegging and ZIRP entirely, and thereby allow financial markets to once again engage in honest price discovery and two-way trading; and to allow the natural business cycle to meander along its own capitalist path as determined not by the 12 members of the monetary politburo, but the 317 million consumers, producers, investors, entrepreneurs and even speculators who comprise the real main street economy.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

FOMC Minutes Show Fed Fears Investors Are Too Complacent; QE To End In October





Having continued to taper, expressed no fear of inflation, and been nothing but confident that Q1 was nothing-but-weather at the press conference, the FOMC Minutes shows:

*SOME FED OFFICIALS SAW INVESTORS AS TOO COMPLACENT ON RISKS
*FED SAW INSUFFICIENT INVESTOR UNCERTAINTY ON ECONOMY, RATES
*FOMC SEES QE ENDING WITH $15 BLN CUT IN OCT. IF OUTLOOK HOLDS

Strange not a mention of the surge in Treasury fails but this appears as close to a "sell" as the Fed will give...

Pre-FOMC Minutes: S&P Futs 1964, Gold $1323.50, 10Y 2.59%, Oil $102.22, JPY 101.75

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Destroying The "Recessions Can't Happen Without A Yield Curve Inversion" Myth





A repeated theme on financial-TV in recent weeks is that there cannot be a recession without a yield-curve inversion first because in each of the last 6 recessions stretching back 50+ years, short-term rates rose above long-term rates before the recession. However, if you study the period after The Great Depression and even in Japan's last 25 years (that are the best examples of balance sheet recessions), it is very common to have a recession without a yield curve inversion first. In-fact, there were 6 of them following The Great Depression into the 1950's.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

President Obama To Explain Why Wal-Mart's CEO Is Wrong; Economy Is Doing Great - Live Feed





Stocks at record highs... Unemployment rates at multi-year lows... magical job creation 'impressive'... President Obama has a lot to proclaim "mission accomplished" over - except its all fallacious (as Wal-Mart's CEO recently explained). Of course, this will all be solved if everyone was paid 'fairly' at least $15/hour despite the greatest irony of Obama's inequality fight is that "his policies are squeezing the middle class and causing the Fed – with the President’s encouragement – to engage in the radical monetary policy, which is exacerbating inequality. This simple truth cannot be repeated often enough."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Why Housing Will Crash Again - But For Different Reasons Than Last Time





Institutionalizing the speculative excesses that inflated the previous housing bubble has fed magical thinking and fostered illusions of phantom wealth and security.

 
GoldCore's picture

Gold Rigged “To Benefit Banks, At Expense Of Producers, Traders, Investors, Jewellers And Other Market Participants”?





We believe that a more transparent and reliable fixing could lead to higher gold prices as we suspect that prices are artificially low at this time and do not reflect the delicate supply demand balance in the physical gold market ... Nor do they capture the degree of systemic and geopolitical risk in the world today."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

How To Fight The Ex-Im Bank





Here’s a radical suggestion to help counter to the pro-crony forces: be upfront about the true sinister nature of organizations like the Ex-Im Bank. Let’s call a spade a spade, and finally describe the Ex-Im Bank what it truly is: fascism. Such a word comes off as a boogey man term used to rile up emotions. But in the battle of ideas, sophistry always comes up short. Just as the shortest distance between two points is a straight line, precise words are better than vague words when it comes to making a point.

 
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