Recession

Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: June 11





  • World Bank Cuts Global Growth Forecast After ‘Bumpy’ 2014 Start (BBG)
  • Al-Qaeda Offshoot Threatens Iraq Oil Site After Taking Mosul (BBG)
  • Fed Prepares to Keep Record Balance Sheet for Years to Come (BBG)
  • EU investigates tax rulings on Apple, Starbucks, Fiat unit (Reuters)
  • Cantor Loss Shocks Republicans, Dims Immigration Changes (BBG)
  • More surveillance: Google to Buy Satellite-Imaging Startup for $500 Million (WSJ)
  • Tea Party activist who defeated Cantor focused on budget, immigration (Reuters)
  • Airbus Suffers Worst Order Loss as Emirates Deal Scrapped (BBG)
  • Amazon.com plans local services marketplace this year (Reuters)
  • Amazon Stops Taking Advance Orders for ‘Lego’ and Other Warner Videos (NYT)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Two Thirds Of Gen X Households Have Less Wealth Than Their Parents Did At The Same Age





Just how badly is Generation X doing? Bad enough to turn around the entire concept of middle-class prosperity in America - one where every next generation should do better than the preceding one - on its head. "Only one-third of Generation X households had more wealth than their parents held at the same age, even though most earn more, The Pew Charitable Trusts found." And there, in a nutshell, is your so-called recovery: two thirds of an entire generation - one which is in its prime working years - doing worse than the one before them!

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Fed Warns The Plunge In "Routine" Jobs Won't Slow Down Anytime Soon





Employment in the United States is becoming increasingly polarized, growing ever more concentrated in the highest- and lowest-paying occupations and creating growing income inequality. As the Dallas Fed explains, market changes involving middle-skill jobs in the U.S. are hastening labor market polarization. So-called "Routine" jobs have declined from 58% of employment in 1981 to 44% in 2011, while both types of non-routine jobs have expanded. Since 1990, none of the routine jobs lost in these downturns came back in the following expansions. This is a problem since middle-skill, routine jobs still account for almost half of all existing jobs; and as the Dallas Fed concludes, the pace of labor market polarization is unlikely to slow down anytime soon.

 

 
EconMatters's picture

Wall Street Yield Trade: Another Explanation For Low Inflation





One major factor to the slow growth/low inflation in the U.S. is the Wall Street Yield Trade.  By incentivizing unproductive use of capital, low interest rate via monetary policy is actually deflationary.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Jobs Friday: What The Bubblevision Revelers Missed





Yes, the nonfarm payroll clocked in at 138.5 million jobs and thereby retraced for the first time the point at which it stood 77 months ago in December 2007. This predictably elicited another “milestone of progress” squeal from the mainstream media. So you have to wonder. Did these people skip history class? Do they understand the vital idea of “context”? So if you want to try a little “context” absurdity recall this. So far we have created a trifling 100k “new” jobs since the last cyclical peak. During the equivalent 77 months in the Reagan era the US economy actually generated 150 times more jobs!

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Great Insanity In Context (200 Years Of European Bonds)





We have had The Great Depression, The Great Moderation, and The Great Recession... but now, thanks to central banks around the world, we have The Great Insanity. Nowhere is the disconnect between market rates and fundamental realities more evident than in European peripheral bond yields. While it is easy to look at the last decade and wonder how it is possible that such heavily indebted (and increasingly indebted) nations could have seen bond yields collapse... but as Deutsche Bank's Jim Reid explains, a glance at France, Italy, and Spain bond yields over the last 200 years shows that this really is a unique time in history (and not in a good way).

 
Tyler Durden's picture

What's The Source Of Soaring Corporate Profits? Stagnant Wages





What if all the low-hanging fruit of outsourcing jobs and financialization have already been plucked by Corporate America?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Deutsche Warns Markets Have Left The "Complacency" Phase, Have Entered Full Blown "Mania"





With a closing P/E ratio over 17 and a VIX under 11, Deutsche Bank's David Bianco is sticking with his cautious call for the summer. Their preferred measure of equity market emotions is the price-to-earnings ratio divided by the VIX. As of Friday's close, this sentiment measure has never been higher and is in extreme "Mania" phase. Deutsche's advice to all the summertime-'chasers' - "wait for a better entry."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

US Workers In The Prime 25-54 Age Group Are Still 2.6 Million Short Of Recovering Post-Crisis Job Losses





While the total number of jobs may have recovered its post December 2007 losses, for Americans aged 25-54, there is still a long, long time to go, with the prime US age group still over 2.6 million jobs short of recovering all of its post December-2007 losses. And there's more.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The US Housing Market's Darkening Data





When looking at residential real estate, we often tend to focus almost solely on recent price movements in assessing the health of the housing market at any point in time. But as both homeowners and income-earners in the larger economy, of which the housing market is an important component, to really understand what's going on, we need clarity into the larger cycle driving those price movements. The more we look at today's data, the more it looks like that we are in a new type of pricing cycle -- one that homeowners and housing investors have no prior experience with. And the more we learn about the fundamentals underlying the current cycle, the harder it becomes to justify today's home prices on any sustained level. Meaning a downward reversion in home values is very probable in the coming years.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

There Is No Tradeoff Between Inflation And Unemployment





Anyone reading the regular Federal Open Market Committee press releases can easily envision Chairman Yellen and the Federal Reserve team at the economic controls, carefully adjusting the economy’s price level and employment numbers. The dashboard of macroeconomic data is vigilantly monitored while the monetary switches, accelerators, and other devices are constantly tweaked, all in order to “foster maximum employment and price stability." The Federal Reserve believes increasing the money supply spurs economic growth, and that such growth, if too strong, will in turn cause price inflation. But if the monetary expansion slows, economic growth may stall and unemployment will rise. So the dilemma can only be solved with a constant iterative process: monetary growth is continuously adjusted until a delicate balance exists between price inflation and unemployment. This faulty reasoning finds its empirical justification in the Phillips curve. Like many Keynesian artifacts, its legacy governs policy long after it has been rendered defunct. 

 
Marc To Market's picture

FX: As You Were





A look at the likely price action in the forex market in the week ahead.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Fed Won't Let the Economy Heal





Most commentators are of the view that the Fed’s massive monetary pumping of 2008 has prevented a major economic disaster. We suggest that the massive pumping has bought time for non-productive bubble activities, thereby weakening the economy as a whole. Contrary to popular thinking, an economic cleansing is a must to “fix” the mess caused by the Fed’s loose policies. To prevent future economic pain, what is required is the closure of all the loopholes for the creation of money out of “thin air.”

 
Tyler Durden's picture

About Those Forecasts Of Eternally Rising Corporate Profits...





If corporate profits decline (as they did in Q1), what will hold up the market's lofty valuations other than the tapering flood of liquidity from the Federal Reserve? Answer: nothing. Complacent punters will discover to their great dismay that liquidity is only one dynamic of many.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Abenomics' Legacy: Japan's Greatest "Misery" In 33 Years





Meet Mieko Tatsunami, a 70 year old retired kimono dresser from Tokyo. Unlike the scores of paid actors ordered to pitch Abenomics and to spread the gospel of rising asset prices, Mieko shares a most rare commodity in this day of pervasive propaganda: the truth. “The price of everything we eat on a daily basis is going up,” Tatsunami, 70, a retired kimono dresser, said while shopping in Tokyo’s Sugamo area. “I’m making do by halving the amount of meat I serve and adding more vegetables.” Ironically, that's what Americans are doing too. Only here the "halving" of the food is done by the food producers, while the consumers rarely if ever notices that they are paying the same amount for ever lesser amounts of food. At least in Japan they are honest about the food inflation. As Bloomberg shows, Tatsunami’s concerns stem from the price of food soaring at the fastest pace in 23 years after April’s sales-tax increase. Rising prices helped push the nation’s misery index to the highest level since 1981, while wages adjusted for inflation fell the most in more than four years.

 
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