• williambanzai7
    02/01/2015 - 16:08
    “Quarterbacks shouldn’t leave the pocket, because that’s where the money is. Every politician knows this.”--Jarod Kintz
  • Marc To Market
    02/01/2015 - 11:11
    A straight forward discussion of the factors driving the US dollar. 

recovery

Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: May 23





  • Rajoy to ask for ECB assistance, according to reports (Sharecast)
  • Bundesbank Suggests Greek Exit From Euro Would Be Manageable (Bloomberg)
  • Unemployed Burn as Fed Fiddles in Debate Over Natural Rate (Bloomberg)
  • Regulators, investors turn up heat over Facebook IPO (Reuters)
  • China to boost private energy investment to bolster economy (Reuters)
  • OECD fears euro woe to snap brittle world recovery (Reuters)
  • China slowdown threatens Australia - World Bank (Herald Sun)
  • Guessing game begins over next Treasury chief (Reuters)
  • Italians spurn main parties in local polls (FT)
  • A fragile Europe must change fast (FT)
  • Spain to outline Bankia plan, may announce bailout size (Reuters)
  • China Should Adjust Policy Early - Government Researcher (WSJ)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

New Greek Bonds Crash To All Time Lows As "Negative Pledge" Fears Emerge; The Portugal Case?





A quick look at the Fresh-Start Greek Government Bond (GGB2) complex shows that as of this morning it has tumbled to fresh all time lows across the curve, and now trades at a more than 50% loss to the March PSI conversion price. The reason for this dump is not so much on fear of a Greek exit, but once again a reflection of precisely what we expected would happen, and as explained in our January Subordination 101 post. Last week, the fact that a PSI hold out, holding English-law bonds managed to get par recovery while all the other lemmings have so far eaten a nearly 90% loss, has sparked a realization among all the other hold outs that since they have covenant protection, they should all demand the same treatment. And indeed, another one has stepped up, only this time not a holder demanding par maturity paydown, but one who has read their bond indenture and was delighted to find the words "negative pledge." As Bloomberg reports "a holder of Greek bonds that weren’t settled in the biggest-ever debt restructuring said he’ll demand immediate payment unless the government posts collateral against his investment. Rolf Koch, a private investor who says he holds 500,000 Swiss francs ($528,000) of the notes due in July 2013, argued that he’s entitled to equal treatment with Finland, which made getting collateral a condition of contributing to Greece’s second bailout. He wrote to the paying agent, Credit Suisse Group AG, invoking the bonds’ so-called negative-pledge clause, according to the text of a letter seen by Bloomberg News."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: OPEC Has Lost The Power To Lower The Price of Oil





There’s been a lot of excitement in the past year over the rise of North American oil production and the promise of increased oil production across the whole of the Americas in the years to come. National security experts and other geo-political observers have waxed poetic at the thought of this emerging, hemispheric strength in energy supply. What’s less discussed, however, is the negligible effect this supply swing is having on lowering the price of oil, due to the fact that, combined with OPEC production, aggregate global production remains mostly flat.  But there’s another component to this new belief in the changing global landscape for oil: the dawning awareness that OPEC’s power has finally gone into decline. You can read the celebration of OPEC’s waning in power in practically every publication from Foreign Policy to various political blogs and op-eds.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Why The Market Is Up: Goldman Just Dumped On Stocks





Back on March 21, Goldman's Peter Oppenheimer released the "Long Good Buy, The Case For Equities", which was Goldman's subversive attempt to rally equity into buying all the stocks that Goldman had to offload, as well as buy all TSYs that GS clients had to sell. Needless to say, Goldman top ticked the market and stocks have tumbled ever since, even as the 10 Year soared from 2.5% to the current ~1.75%. So what? Well, this morning the same analyst, precisely two months on the anniversary of his "once in in a lifetime" stock buying opportunity, has released a new report with the paradoxical header: "Near-term risks are to the downside." But, but... Anyway, that's all the market needed to grasp that Goldman's prop desk is now buying every piece of risk not nailed down hand over fist as the June FOMC meeting is now the D-Day. Futures have soared ever since.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Daily US Opening News And Market Re-Cap: May 22





UK CPI this morning came in weaker than expected at 3.0% Y/Y in April, weighed by a fall in air fares, alcohol, clothes and sea transport, according to the ONS. The release saw aggressive selling of GBP in the currency market and has underpinned the rise in gilt futures. Alongside the 26th month low in UK CPI the IMF also issued their latest assessment on the UK economy and said further policy easing is required and that the Bank could cut its interest rate from the current 0.5% level. In other market moving news a Greek government source said that Greek banks are to receive a EUR 18bln recapitalisation down payment this Friday which initially saw the EUR and stock futures rally, however, the move was short lived as it became clear that the payment is scheduled as part of the bailout programme for Greece. Elsewhere, Fitch made a surprise announcement and downgraded the Japanese sovereign rating by two notches to A+, outlook negative. The move means Fitch has the lowest rating for Japan of the three main rating agencies so we remain vigilant for any comments from S&P and Moody’s today.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Benefits Of A College Education





... Are what again? As the following graphic from IBD demonstrates, for the first time in history, a majority of jobless workers over 25 have attended some college, and now outnumber those without a job who simply have a high school diploma or less. But at least those in the fomer category have tens of thousands of non-dischargeable debt to show for it.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Keynesian Emperor, Undressed





The standard Keynesian narrative that "Households and countries are not spending because they can’t borrow the funds to do so, and the best way to revive growth, the argument goes, is to find ways to get the money flowing again." is not working. In fact, former IMF Director Raghuram Rajan points out, today’s economic troubles are not simply the result of inadequate demand but the result, equally, of a distorted supply side as technology and foreign competition means that "advanced economies were losing their ability to grow by making useful things." Detailing his view of the mistakes of the Keynesian dream, Rajan notes "The growth that these countries engineered, with its dependence on borrowing, proved unsustainable.", and critically his conclusion that the industrial countries have a choice. They can act as if all is well except that their consumers are in a funk and so what John Maynard Keynes called “animal spirits” must be revived through stimulus measures. Or they can treat the crisis as a wake-up call and move to fix all that has been papered over in the last few decades and thus put themselves in a better position to take advantage of coming opportunities.

 
Phoenix Capital Research's picture

Neither the Fed Nor the ECB Can Stop What's Coming





 

The two biggest market props of the last two years: the Fed and the ECB have found their hands tied. What will follow will make 2008 look like a joke. On that note, if you have not taken steps to prepare for the end of the EU (and its impact on the US and global banking system), you NEED TO DO SO NOW!

 
 
George Washington's picture

Bipartisan Congressional Bill Would Authorize the Use of Propaganda On Americans Living Inside America





Because Banning Propaganda “Ties the Hands of America’s Diplomatic Officials, Military, and Others by Inhibiting Our Ability to Effectively Communicate In a Credible Way”

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Italy And The Great Tax Revolt





Taxation is theft. There is no denying this.  If I and a few brutes appeared at the door of an unsuspecting individual and demanded monetary compensation less we drag him off to jail, this would be a clear cut case of robbery.  It is a common tactic used by mobs or street gangs to offer protection with the barrel of a gun.  The only difference between shakedowns by private thugs and those employed by the state is the badge.  The badge legalizes extortion and imprisonment. With that being said, it has been three years since the financial crisis and governments around the world are still reeling in the lesser Depression.  Tax collections are down while public expenditures have skyrocketed in a vain effort to stabilize the economy.  Much of this mass orgy in spending has been financed by central banks printing money and the suppression of interest rates down to artificially low levels.  This is the Keynesian remedy to recession.  Spend what you don’t have via the printing press.  Have central bankers create paradise on Earth through counterfeiting.

So far it hasn’t worked.

 
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