recovery

Market Trapped As Recession Risk Rises

With the ongoing political circus, weak corporate earnings (considering the massive reductions in expectations since the beginning of the year), Apple and Amazon both missing expectations (which really goes to the heart of the consumer), and consumer sentiment waning, it is surprising the markets are still holding up as well as they are. As long as the markets can maintain support about 2125, the bull market is still in play, but at this point, not by much.

The Story Of Durable Goods Is The Story Of The (Global) Economy

Here’s the part that economists, policymakers, and the media (all three largely indistinguishable from each other) miss – lack of true growth is contraction, and the worst kind because it isn’t recession contraction it is depression contraction. In the former, all is forgotten after a time; in the latter where even occasional positive numbers can be and often are highly deceptive, time is the biggest problem.

The Coming Bond Market Crash - An Interview With Eric Hadik

"I believe 2017--2021 will represent the end and reversal of that multi-decade trend - as the debt bubble bursts and bond markets begin to crash... Each phase was a desperate battle between centralized, governmental control of currency versus universal, hard-asset based currency. And each phase saw the acceleration and intensification of that battle take hold in the ‘7’ year."

Weekend Reading: Stuck In The Middle - Again

Just as was witnessed following “The Great Depression,” the bursting of the next asset bubble will likely once again drive participants away from the market for an entire generation, or longer. The problem for individual investors is the “trap” that is currently being laid between the appearance of strong market dynamics against the backdrop of weak economic and market fundamentals. Ignoring the last two to chase the former has historically not worked out well.

Ugly! "Failure Almost Guaranteed" Regardless Of Who Wins The Election

The word of the day is “ugly”. That’s how Steen Jakobsen, Saxo Bank CIO and chief economist describes the US presidential campaign, broken social contracts, public debt, and productivity. Things are so ugly, Jakobsen says “failure is almost guaranteed” regardless of who wins the election.