Renminbi

These Five Trends In China Will Change The Gold Market

The gold market will soon be very different than from what we see today - largely due to the current developments in China. China’s influence will impact not just gold investors but everyone who has a vested interest in the global economy, stock markets, and the US dollar. After all, China will be a dominant force in all, as most analysts project. Here are the five trends in China that will change the gold market forever...

IIF Ruins The Party, Predicts Another $420 Billion In Chinese Capital Outflows This Year

According to the latest Institute of International Finance forecast, and in validation of Kyle Bass' strong conviction that China is about to suffer a major 15%+ devaluation, China's capital outflow headaches may be only just starting. According to the IIF's latest report released today, global investors are expected to pull $538 billion out of China's slowing economy in 2016, which means another $420 billion after the $118 billion that has already been withdrawn in Q1.

"China Yuan Gold Fix Is Part Of A Planned Shift From Dollar": China's Bocom

China's shift to an official local-currency-based gold fixing is "the culmination of a two-year plan to move away from a US-centric monetary system," according to Bocom strategist Hao Hong. In an insightfully honest Bloomberg TV interview, Hong admits that "by trading physical gold in renminbi, China is slowly chipping away at the dominance of US dollars." Gold, silver, and petroleum "are the three USD-based commodites that China wants most control of" according to Hong but "gold in particular is one of the commodities that China is hoarding very hard."

Hungary Issues Sovereign Bonds Denominated In Yuan: Another Nail In US Reserve Currency Status?

Hungary priced the three-year bond at a yield of 6.25%, raising 1 billion yuan ($154 million), a small size for a sovereign deal. Bankers not involved in the transaction estimate that if Hungary issued debt in U.S. dollars and swapped the proceeds into yuan, it would have paid almost 1% less in annual interest costs. The dim-sum market isn’t an appealing market right now. Issuance of offshore yuan bonds has been falling consistently since Beijing’s decision to devalue its currency by 2% in August last year—the prospect of another yuan devaluation has sapped much of the appeal of such bonds for offshore investors.

China Embraces Gold In Advance Of Post-Dollar Era

To challenge the US dollar hegemony and increase its power in the global realm of finance, China has a potent gold strategy. Whilst the State Council is preparing itself for the inevitable decay of the current international monetary system, it has firmly embraced gold in its economy. With a staggering pace the government has developed the Chinese domestic gold market, stimulated private gold accumulation and increased its official gold reserves in order to ensure financial stability and support the internationalisation of the renminbi.

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At the latest G20 meeting, China’s central bank vowed to promote the use of SDRs in the Chinese economy, just four months after the IMF decided to include the RMB as part of the currency basket un-derlying SDRs. Adding the RMB marks only the 5th time the Fund changed the composition of the basket since formally moving away from a gold based system in 1974. However, as history shows, the SDR has been unable to maintain value as gold has. Adding the RMB to the basket will hardly change that.