• Phoenix Capital...
    07/09/2014 - 13:00
    The Fed and its policies have warped the culture of capitalism to the point that we now exist in a Centrally-Planned nightmare in which a handful of academics influence the economy and world reserve...

Renminbi

Tyler Durden's picture

Did China Just Fire The First Salvo Towards A New Gold Standard?





In a somewhat shockingly blunt comment from the mouthpiece of Chinese officialdom, Yao Yudong of the PBoC's monetary policy committee has called for a new Bretton Woods system to strengthen the management of global liquidity. In an article in the China Securities Journal, Yao called for more power to the IMF as international copperation and supervision are needed. While comments seem somewhat barbed towards the rest of the world's currency devaluers, given China's growing physical gold demand and the fixed-exchange-rate peg that 'Bretton Woods' represents, and contrary to prevailing misconceptions that the SDR may be the currency of the future, China just may opt to have its own hard asset backed optionality for the future; suggesting the new 'bancor' would be the barbarous relic (or perhaps worse for the US, the Renminbi). Of course, the writing has been on the wall for China's push to end the dollar reserve supremacy for over two years as we have dutifully noted - since no 'world reserve currency' lasts forever.

 
GoldCore's picture

China’s Yuan Set To Become Global Reserve Currency With Gold Backing?





According to media reports, the People's Bank of China is considering phasing out the dollar as the reference currency or peg for the yuan, and to start using gold as the reference point.

The reports have not been confirmed officially, but there has been official comments to that effect in recent years and Chinese academics have advocated backing the renminbi or yuan with gold.

Beijing's possible move to back the yuan with gold would be a strategic move in order to, lessen the risk of inflation, increase the yuan’s attractiveness as an investment medium and create faith in the yuan as a reserve currency.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

PBOC Scraps Lending Rate Floor In "Full Liberalization" Of Interest Rate Controls





The PBOC just announced that China will scrap its bank lending rate floor and controls on bill discount rate. It will also allow banks to set lending rate based on commercial preinciples with a goal of promoting economic restructuring. China will continue differentiated lending policies for housing sector and will leave unchanged lending floating rates for home buyers.

 
EB's picture

Jim Rickards on a September Tapering; And His Reaction to Our Chinese Currency Bait and Switch Theory





Tired of tapering talk? We couldn't resist. Then, on to more pressing matters. Seems an investment in China might just not be what it seems to be.  Think Three Paddy Hat Monty.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Bundesbank Warns China's Currency "On Its Way To Becoming Global Reserve Currency"





Following the most recent shift 'away' from a USD-centric world (with the China-Australia direct currency convertibility), it seems the possibility of China's Yuan as the next global reserve currency is getting closer. The Brits, Germans, and now the Swiss (who just signed a free-trade-agreement with China) are all actively vying to become Europe's Yuan trading hub as it seems the long line of developments to internationalize the currency over the past two years. As Bundesbank board member Joachim Nagel noted in a speech entitled "Reniminbi as a potential reserve currency" this week, "the Chinese currency is well on its way to becoming one of the future global reserve currencies." He noted that, although the USD is still the most commonly-used currency for settling trade with China; from virtually zero in 2010, the Yuan is used to settle over 12% of trading transactions now - and is likley to increase further.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: June 28





  • Fashionable 'Risk Parity' Funds Hit Hard (WSJ)
  • No 1997 Asian Crisis Return as China Trembles (BBG)
  • Greece Faces Collapse of Second Key Privatization (FT)
  • China Bad-Loan Alarm Sounded by Record Bank Spread Jump (BBG)
  • Iranian official signals no scaling back in nuclear activity (Reuters)
  • Asmussen Says Any QE Discussions at ECB Not Policy Relevant (BBG)
  • Flat Japanese consumer prices aid Kuroda (FT)
  • Vietnam Devalues Dong for First Time Since ’11 to Boost Reserves (BBG)
  • World Bank Sees ‘Vulnerable’ Food System on Climate Change (BBG)
  • Fed big-hitters seek to quash QE fears (FT)
  • EU Leaders Set to Slow Support for Ailing Banks (BBG)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Developing Crisis In The Developing World





Things have been a little erratic lately here in US, but not really headline-worthy. The economy continues to grow, sort of, houses continue to sell and stock and bond prices fluctuate but can’t seem to follow through in either direction. We are not, in short, engulfed in any kind of crisis. But out in the world, especially in once-hot emerging markets like Brazil and China, the story is very different. So can the US stay placid when the rest of the world turns chaotic? Highly doubtful. There’s a market phenomenon in which one investment play blows up and forces those on the wrong side of the trade to dump their liquid assets to raise cash. Which causes the high-quality assets to fall as much or more than the junk. As Noland notes, the world’s premier liquid asset is the Treasury bond. If the developing world’s need to raise cash is a factor in the recent spike in US interest rates, this implies a feedback loop in which rising US rates further destabilize emerging markets, forcing the sale of more Treasuries, and so on.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Charles Gave Warns: "Should The Fed Lose Control, The Downside Move In Markets May Be Terrifying"





"By propping up asset markets, the Fed has created an illusion that wealth is being created. The next step, according to Bernanke’s plan,  should be for growth to follow. In fact, there is no reason why the rise in prices of financial assets should lead to actual investments or a rise in the median income. So far, it has not. There has been no real increase in the private sector propensity to borrow, and the danger may be that any further public sector borrowing will hasten the decline because of our “permanent asset hypothesis”. This means that, should the Fed lose control of asset prices (is this what is now happening in Japan?), then the game will be up and the downside move in markets may well be terrifying."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: June 3





  • BIS lays out "simple" plan for how to handle bank failures (Reuters) - Are we still holding our breath on Basel III?
  • Deficit Deal Even Less Likely - Improving U.S. Fiscal Health Eases Pressure for a 'Grand Bargain' Amid Gridlock (WSJ)
  • IRS Faulted on Conference Spending (WSJ)
  • Deadly MERS-CoV virus spreads to Italy (CNN)
  • Turkish PM Erdogan calls for calm after days of protests (Reuters)
  • Financial system ‘waiting for next crisis’ (FT)
  • Russia to send nuclear submarines to southern seas (Reuters)
  • China Nuclear Stockpile Grows as India Matches Pakistan Rise (BBG)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Implied Assumptions





Financial markets operate on a number of implied assumptions about growth, policy direction and other factors. Experience tells us that these assumptions often turn out to be erroneous. A modern economy is an incredibly complex entity that involves millions of transactions every day. The notion that this vast and largely self-governing system can be controlled through tools such as government spending and/or an increase in the quantity of money is - to say the least - bizarre. A flood is rarely a cure-all solution to a drought; it just creates new problems for an already suffering population. From 2002 to 2007, we witnessed a massive attempt by central banks to manipulate interest rates and currency exchange rates. The consequences of this action came due in 2008-2009. Criminal psychologists have long known that villains frequently return to the scene of their crime—in the case of western policymakers, they seem to be looking to finish off a caper that went badly wrong at the first attempt. The end result for the broader community is unlikely to be pretty.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: May 3





  • U.S. Bulks Up to Combat Iran (WSJ)
  • Taking sides in Syria is hard choice for Israel (Reuters)
  • Gold Traders Most Bearish in Three Years After Drop (BBG)
  • It's a Hard Job Predicting Payrolls Number  (WSJ)
  • EU economies to breach deficit limits as economic picture darkens (FT)
  • IBM Says U.S. Justice Investigating Bribery Allegations (BBG)
  • At Texas fertilizer plant, a history of theft, tampering (Reuters)
  • SAC Sets Plan to Dock Pay in Cases of Wrongdoing (WSJ) - "in case of"?
  • EU to propose duties on Chinese solar panels (Reuters)
  • Billionaire Kaiser Exploiting Charity Loophole With Boats (BBG)
  • SEC Zeroing In on 'Prime' Funds (WSJ)
  • Apple Avoids $9.2 Billion in Taxes With Debt Deal (BBG)
  • China April official services PMI at 54.5 vs 55.6 in March (Reuters)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: May 2





  • The number of bond funds that own stocks has surged to its highest point in at least 18 years (WSJ)
  • Clubby London Trading Scene Fostered Libor Rate-Fixing Scandal (WSJ)
  • Cheap money bankrolls Wall Street's bet on housing (Reuters)
  • Bank of Japan reveals concerns over easing policy (FT)
  • iPads and low-end rivals propel higher tablet shipments  (Reuters)
  • China Cyberspies Outwit U.S. Stealing Military Secrets (BBG)
  • Draghi Fuels Bets on Rate Cut With Risk of Limited Impact (BBG)
  • China guides renminbi to fresh high against US dollar (FT)
  • Japan is preparing to start up a massive nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant (WSJ)
  • Apple’s Ive Seen Risking iOS 7 Delay on Software Overhaul (BBG)
  • UBS faces calls for break-up at investor meeting (Reuters)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: April 24





  • The Inland Empire bubble is back: BMW to Amazon Space Demand Spurs Rush to Inland Empire (BBG)
  • Tamerlan Tsarnaev was on classified government watch lists (Reuters)
  • Brothers in Boston Bombing Case Said Drawn to Radicalism (BBG)
  • Germany Spurns Calls to Loosen Austerity Stance (WSJ)
  • Spain poised to ease austerity push (FT)
  • What ever happened to France's voice in Europe? (Reuters)
  • U.S., South Korea Reach Nuclear Deal (WSJ)
  • U.S. Sees No Hard Evidence of Syrian Chemical Weapons Use (BBG)
  • RBA Set to Invest Foreign Currency Reserves in China, Lowe Says (BBG)
  • FedEx Wins $10.5 Billion Postal Contract as UPS Shut Out (BBG)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

All Eyes On The Gold Rout, Most Oversold In 14 Years





While China's trifecta miss of GDP, Retail Sales and Industrial Production all coming lower than expected was likely a factor in the overnight rout of gold, the initial burst of selling started well before the Chinese data hit the tape, or as soon as Japan opened for trading with forced financial institution selling to prefund cash for any and all future JGB VaR-driven margin calls. It was all downhill from there, literally, with overnight selling of gold punctured by brief burst of targeted stop hunting, sending the metal down $116 per ounce, as spot touches $1385 after trading nearly at $1500 yesterday and down $200 in 4 days. End result, whether due to a re-collapsing global economy, margin calls, fears forced Cyprus gold selling will be imposed on all other insolvent European countries, coordinated central bank slams, hedge fund positioning, long unwinds, liquidations, fears about future demand, or whatever the usual selling suspects are, is that gold tumbles an unprecedented 7.8% on 230,000 contracts in one day, and well over 10% in two days, pushing the yellow metal 14 day RSI band to 18, meaning it is now most oversold since 1999. In brief, it is an all out panic, with Goldman still telling clients to sell, i.e., buying every shiny ounce all the way down (not to mention India, where accordingto UBS Friday demand was double the average).

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Carmen Reinhart: "No Doubt. Our Pensions Are Screwed."





"The crisis isn't over yet," warns Carmen Reinhart, "not in the US and not in Europe." Known for her deep understanding that 'it's never different this time', the Harvard economist drops the truth grenade a number of times in this excellent Der Spiegel interview. Sweeping away the sound and fury of a self-serving Federal Reserve or BoJ, she chides, "no central bank will admit it is keeping rates low to help governments out of their debt crises. But in fact they are bending over backwards to help governments to finance their deficits," and guess what, "this is nothing new in history." After World War II, all countries that had a big debt overhang relied on financial repression to avoid an explicit default. After the war, governments imposed interest rate ceilings for government bonds; but, nowadays, she explains, "monetary policy is doing the job. And with high unemployment and low inflation that doesn't even look suspicious. Only when inflation picks up, which is ultimately going to happen, will it become obvious that central banks have become subservient to governments." Nations "seldom just grow themselves out of debt," as so many believe is possible, "you need a combination of austerity, so that you don't add further to the pile of debt, and higher inflation, which is effectively a subtle form of taxation," with the consequence that people are going to lose their savings. Reinhart succinctly summarizes, "no doubt, our pensions are screwed."

 
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