Reserve Currency

Tyler Durden's picture

The Dollar Decline Continues: China Starts Direct Convertibility With Asia's #1 Financial Hub





Earlier this week some of the biggest financial news of the year made huge waves all over Asia. Yet in the Western press, this hugely important information has barely even been mentioned. So what’s the news? The Chinese government announced that the renminbi will become directly convertible with the Singapore dollar... effective immediately.

 
GoldCore's picture

"Gold Is A Good Place To Put Money These Days" - Greenspan





Greenspan told the CFR that "gold is a good place to put money these days given it's value as a currency outside of the policies conducted by governments." "Gold has always been accepted without reference to any other guarantee." When asked where the price of gold was headed in the next five years he said “higher --- measurably" ...

 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Are We Ready For The Fall Of Baghdad?





"This is simple payback for Washington's threats, banking fines and penalties against institutions and nations de jure that fail to march to the US tune of dictating trade and financial arrangements. The world is now ganging up on the United States because Washington has terrorized smaller nations around the world for decades as the big bully on the block."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Putin Warns Of Risk Of Major Conflict, Says Dollar Losing Reserve Currency Status





Having been relatively quiet for a while, Russia's leader Vladimir, speaking in Sochi (following meetings with Middle East crown princes who confirmed Russia as a key partner - "isolated"?), has unleashed his most aggressive statements with regard the failing world order: PUTIN SAYS U.S. DOLLAR LOSING TRUST AS RESERVE CURRENCY, WORLD WITHOUT RULES IS POSSIBILITY; ANARCHY GROWING. Adding that the risk of major conflicts involving major countries is growing, as well as the risk of arms control treaties being violated, Putin exclaimed that the US-led unipolar world is like a dictatorship over other countries and that "US leadership brings no good for others," and calls for a new global consensus.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Why Gold Is Undervalued





Gold has been in a bear market for three years. Technical analysts are asking themselves whether they should call an end to this slump on the basis of the "triple-bottom" recently made at $1180/oz, or if they should be wary of a coming downside break beneath that level. The purpose of this article is to look at the drivers of the gold price and explain why today's market value is badly reflective of gold's true worth.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Investing World In 10 Objects





What do an old German bank note, a current $100 bill, and an apple all have in common? The answer, according to ConvergEx's Nick Colas, is that these simple objects can tell us much about the current investment scene, ranging from Europe’s economic challenges to the U.S. Federal Reserve’s attempts to reduce unemployment. Colas takes an “object-ive” approach to analyzing the current investment landscape by describing 10 common items and how they shape our perceptions of reality. The other objects on our list: a hazmat suit, a house in Orlando, a barrel of oil, a Rolex watch, a butterfly, a heating radiator in Berlin, and a smartphone.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Carl Icahn: "The Fed Turned This Market Around Here"





"The Fed is really holding the market up.... The Fed turned this market around here because it let it be known that the Fed funds rate isn't going to be raised in March. I am concerned about the high yield market, I think that's in a major bubble, but nobody knows when it's gonna burst." - Carl Icahn

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The QE4 Countdown Has Begun





The head of the San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank on Tuesday said he would be open to another of round asset purchases if inflation trends were to fall significantly short of the U.S. central bank's target. Although he said it would take a big shift in the U.S. economic outlook for the Fed to restart its bond buying, John Williams said the possibility of a new downturn in Europe and other global economic woes pose a risk to the United States. "If we really get a sustained, disinflationary forecast ... then I think moving back to additional asset purchases in a situation like that should be something we should seriously consider," Williams said in an interview with Reuters.

 
GoldCore's picture

Swiss Gold Referendum May Contribute To Gold Price Surge





With this in mind we hope the Swiss people display their fierce independence and reject the advice of the "experts," many of whom got us into this mess, in favour of the policies that have kept them peaceful and prosperous for centuries ...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Saxobank CIO On The End Of US Dominance





"...the world goes through frequent cycles of redefinition and these periods mean increased tensions and higher volatility. China and Russia are now forming a strong anti-US and anti-dollar alliance. This alliance is expanding in magnitude and impact as China increases its presence not only in Africa but also in Club Med via infrastructure investments." The new world order means less US dominance, a gradual weakening of reserve currency advantages and trade areas away from from Europe and the US. Add to this the much-needed fight against radical Islamism and we have a potential for geopolitical risk finally becoming part of risk assessment and return.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Dow At 8,000





On Tuesday, the Dow fell 272 points. No big deal, of course - we rebounded the most in 3 years yesterday. But what if it continued? Just six years ago it fell 51%. It could easily do so again – back down to, say, 8,000. There would be nothing unusual about it. 50% corrections are normal. You know what would happen, don’t you? Ever since the "Black Monday" stock market crash in 1987 it has been standard procedure for the Fed to react quickly. But what if Yellen & Co. got out the party favors... set up the booze on the counter... laid out some dishes with pretzels and olives... and nobody came? What if the stock market stayed down for 30 years, as it has in Japan?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

8 Reasons Why The Long-Bond Is Going Under 2.50%





Almost everyone is expecting much higher yields in the near term, but a 30-year drop in yield toward 2.5% should be considered as a possibility for these 8 reasons...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

10 Reasons Why Reserve Currency Status Is An "Exorbitant Burden"





This may be excessively optimistic on my part, but there seems to be a slow change in the way the world thinks about reserve currencies. For a long time it was widely accepted that reserve currency status granted the provider of the currency substantial economic benefits. For much of my career I pretty much accepted the consensus, but as one starts to think more seriously about the components of the balance of payments, it is clear Keynes wad right in his call for a hybrid currency when he recognized that once the reserve currency was no longer constrained by gold convertibility, the world needed an alternative way to prevent destabilizing imbalances from developing. On the heels of Treasury Economist Kenneth Austin and former-Obama chief economist Jared Bernstein discussing the end of the USD as a reserve currency, Michael Pettis summarizes 10 reasons the USD's reserve status has become an 'exorbitant burden'.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The "Disappointing" Impact Of Euro Devaluation On European GDP





The divergent prospects for growth, interest rates and monetary policies between the euro zone and the United States has led to a completely normal depreciation of the euro against the dollar, despite this depreciation being limited by the euro zone’s external surplus. Most observers are exuberant about this depreciation of the euro, but Natixis asks, faced with imports that the euro zone cannot do without (commodities, components manufactured outside the euro zone due to the segmentation of production processes), is it certain that it has a positive effect on euro-zone growth? Given the sensitivity of the euro zone's foreign trade (in volume terms and in terms of prices) to the euro's exchange rate, and at the historical link between the relative growth of the euro zone and the euro’s exchange rate, Natixis (devastatingly for the recovery-enthusiasts) find that the effect of a depreciation of the euro on euro-zone growth is very minor at best and, at worst, zero.

 
Bruno de Landevoisin's picture

The Monetized New Millennium





You show me sustainable growth through monetization and I'll take my bat & ball and go home. Until then, you're blowing hot air up my backside.

 
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