Risk Premium

Tyler Durden's picture

BoJ QE Exit "Out Of The Question," Former Official Says As Morgan Stanley Talks JGB Liquidity





"If the BoJ persists with its current pace of JGB purchases, then the incentive for investors to reduce their holdings any further is likely to dwindle away within the next 18–24 months, at which point liquidity may evaporate altogether," Morgan Stanley says, calling liquidity the "major theme" in the JGB market. Meanwhile, a former MoF official claims the BoJ is now in so far over its head that an exit from stimulus is "out of the question."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Madness Of Negative Bond Yields





Confidence in the system likely hangs by a much thinner thread than is currently widely perceived. Since “risk asset” prices are soaring in much of Europe, the underlying currents of suspicion are well masked, but that certainly doesn’t mean they don’t exist. While we believe that central bank and regulatory interventions in the market are a major reason why so many bond yields have dropped into negative territory, the role played by distrust in the banking system is probably quite large as well – a suspicion that seems to be confirmed by the strength of the euro-denominated gold price.

 
EconMatters's picture

The 5 Most Crowded Trades on Wall Street: Part 2





The Bond bubble is not only an overcrowded trade, a bubble of historic proportions but it will cause the entire crash of the financial system.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Bonds Or Stocks: Which Bubble Is Bigger? SocGen Answers





Rich valuations point to the likelihood of low returns across asset classes. [W]e develop a cross-asset approach to risk premia and implement it across the asset classes. The results show that valuations are rich across the board. This indicates markets may become shaky as we get closer to the first Fed rate hike in nine years.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Dear Mr. Market, "It's Not Different This Time"





Dear Mr. Market,

I’m writing to you about the sharp lift in equity valuations over the past month...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

ECB Will Cut Rates To Minus 3%: JP Morgan





Should a tail event such a deflationary spiral or Grexit occur, limits on ECB asset purchases will put Mario Draghi at a disadvantage as other central banks race to the bottom. JP Morgan says this will force the ECB to cut interest rates for cash deposits to minus 3% while the dollar will appreciate by 20%, reaching parity with euro in 2015.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

If You Listen Carefully, The Bankers Are Actually Telling Us What Is Going To Happen Next





Are we on the verge of a major worldwide economic downturn? Well, if recent warnings from prominent bankers all over the world are to be believed, that may be precisely what we are facing in the months ahead.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Morgan Stanley Says Grexit Would Send EURUSD Crashing To 0.90





"Greek Fin Min Varoufakis said the euro will collapse if Greece exits, calling Italian debt unsustainable. Markets may gain the impression that Greece may not opt for a compromise, instead opting for an all or nothing approach when negotiating on Wednesday. It seems the risk premium of Greece leaving EMU is rising. Our scenario analysis suggests a Greek exit taking EURUSD down to 0.90."-  Morgan Stanley

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Greece Gambles On "Catastrophic Armageddon" For Europe, Warns It "Only Has Weeks Of Cash Left"





One of the bigger problems facing the new, upstart Greek government, which has set before itself the lofty goal of overturning 6 years of oppressive European policies and countless generations of Greek cronyism, corruption and tax-evasion is not so much the concern about deposit outflows and bank runs - even though it most certainly will be in the next few days unless the Tsipras government finds some resolution to the dramatic standoff with Merkel and the ECB - but something far more trivial: running out of money.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Why Goldman Is Closing Out Its "Tactical Pro-cyclical" European Trades On Grexit Fears





It will be politics rather than economics (or Q€) that drives the shorter-term outlook in Greece. Goldman Sachs warns that the new Greek government’s position is turning more Eurosceptic and confrontational than most (and the market) had anticipated ahead of last weekend’s election. This increases the risk of a political miscalculation leading to an economic and financial accident and, possibly, Greek exit from the Euro area (“Grexit”) and while many assume European authorities have the 'tools' to address market dislocations arising from this event risk, Goldman expects significant market volatility. Rather stunningly, against this background, and in spite of Q€, recommends closing tactical pro-cyclical exposures in peripheral EMU spreads (Italy, Spain and Portugal) and equities (overweight Italy and Spain).

 
EconMatters's picture

The Bond Market Has Reached Tulip Bubble Proportions





The Tulip Lunacy in the Bond market is just off the charts stupidity at its finest!  The U.S. 2-Year Bond is currently pricing in no rate hike, and in fact, a negative rate of inflation over the next two years.... 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Mark Spitznagel On The Value Of Tail-Hedged Equities





Due to the principal-agent problem in the asset management industry, most money managers rationally have a propensity to use a negatively skewed payoff distribution. This kind of behavior, in aggregate, is also evidenced in the historical data, which shows significant losses for professional investors during the largest market downturns. Most investors and asset allocators, in addition to these negatively skewed positions, further view the returns of hedging strategies in a vacuum, rather than as a holistic part of their broader portfolio. Thus, they are likely to consider portfolio hedging programs to be a drag on their performance numbers and further undervalue them. We believe these factors, among others, contribute to a market segmentation that creates an undervaluation in tail-risk hedges.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Archaea Capital's 5 Bad Trades To Avoid Next Year





Blind faith in policymakers remains a bad trade that’s still widely held. Pressure builds everywhere we look. Not as a consequence of the Fed’s ineptitude (which is a constant in the equation, not a variable), but through the blind faith markets continuing to place bets on the very low probability outcome – that everything will turn out well this time around. And so the pressure keeps rising. Managers are under pressure to perform and missing more targets, levering up on hope. Without further delay we present our slightly unconventional annual list. Instead of the usual what you should do, we prefer the more helpful (for us at least) what we probably wouldn’t do. Five fresh new contenders for what could become some very bad trades in the coming year.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Goldman's Q&A On Today's FOMC Statement





Goldman's Sven Jari Stehn answers the 11 most critical questions regarding to day's "most-important-FOMC-meeting-ever."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Q3 2014 Earnings Breakdown - Do You Still Believe In Miracles?





"There is virtually no 'bullish' argument that will currently withstand real scrutiny. Yield analysis is flawed because of the artificial interest rate suppression. It is the same for equity risk premium analysis. Valuations are not cheap, and rising interest rates will slow economic growth. However, because optimistic analysis supports our underlying psychological 'greed,' all real scrutiny to the contrary tends to be dismissed. Unfortunately, it is this 'willful blindness' that eventually leads to a dislocation in the markets."

 
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