Secured Debt

Tyler Durden's picture

Second Largest Coal Miner East Of The Mississippi Files For Bankruptcy: 4000 Patriot Coal Jobs In Peril





At last check Patriot Coal had around 4000 employees. Those soon to be former employees will soon require yet another massive seasonal adjustment by the BLS to be "adjusted" out, because moments ago the second largest coal miner east of the Mississippi and the second largest producer of thermal coal in the eastern US filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

In The New Paranormal, Junk Bonds Are A "Haven Asset"





With NIRP having turned traditional risk-free assets into guaranteed losers, investors have poured more than $9 billion into junk bond ETFs YTD, and while common sense dictates that buying at the top of an epic HY bubble just ahead of a rate hike cycle and against a backdrop characterized by disappearing liquidity in the secondary market for corporate credit is a fool's errand, most investors feel they have little choice. 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Fortescue Has An Idea For Arresting Iron Ore Price Slide: Start A Cartel





Fortescue chairman suggests price collusion as a decent idea for driving up iron ore prices, drawing the attention of Australian regulators. Meanwhile, Morgan Stanley turns bearish citing a number of issues including cash flow and inability to refinance debt.

 
Reggie Middleton's picture

The Auto Industry: Financing a bubble like you've never seen before...





Well, actually, we have seen this bubble before haven't we? Is GM really doing that well? In 2007, they did well too. In 2008 their finance arm= .gov bailout, 2009 GM Bankrupt! It's amazing what mainstream media will report, and even more amazing how many "smart" people (including analysts) will go along with it. Reggie's truth laid bare...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

"Oil Drillers Are Going To Die" In Q2, Conway Mackenzie Warns "Expect Outright Liquidations"





"The second quarter is going to be devastating for the service companies," warns Conway Mackenzie - the largest U.S. restructuring firm - adding that, despite slashing thousands of jobs, delaying (or scrapping) billions in capex amid the prolonged rout in oil prices, "there are certainly companies that are going to die." As Bloomberg reports, oil drillers will begin collapsing under the weight of lower crude prices during the second quarter and energy explorers who employ them will shortly follow with oilfield-service providers are facing a "double-whammy." As we noted here, there are more than a few candidates for this 'death' list as it appears increasingly clear that what was considered an "unambiguously good" narrative for the nation is anything but...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

These Shale Companies Will File For Bankruptcy First: Goldman's "Best And Worst" Shale Matrix





Over a month ago we presented a ranking of "America's most levered energy companies." Since then they have all, without exception gotten clobbered, not only in their publicly traded stock but also their debt. Today, long after the liquidation whirlwind has left junk bond owners dazed and confused, Goldman catches up, and lays out a matrix of shale companies sorted not only by leveraged (they see 2.5x as the cutoff; we used 4.0x) but also by shale asset quality. From there, it also lays out the various opportunities, if any, available to the management teams in the resultant 4 quadrants. Readers will be most interested in the "restructuring/bankruptcy" option, most applicable for Group 4, because these are the names which,  all else equal, will file for bankruptcy first.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Scariest Number Revealed Today: $1.114 Trillion In Eurozone Bad Debt





As we previously reported, the ECB's latest stress test was once again patently flawed from the start. Why? Because as we noted earlier, in its most draconian, "adverse" scenario, the ECB simply refused to contemplate the possibility of deflation. And here's why. Buried deep in the report, on page 75 of 178, is the following revelation which contains in it the scariest number presented to the public today.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Ebola Epidemic Silver-Lining: IMF Bailouts For Everyone





Never waste a good crisis. While we already knew a major reason for The West chasing into Africa was to leverage its relatively low credit levels as the last bastion of Keynesian-stimulus-hope in the world (estimated at between $5 and $10 trillion in secured debt, using its extensive untapped resources as first-lien collateral). And so it is little surprise that, as The WSJ reports, The International Monetary Fund on Thursday warned the West African Ebola epidemic requires a "large scale" global intervention to control a crisis that is ravaging economies in the region. All three major Ebola-suffering countries were already in bailout programs ($200mm loan in 2012 for Guinea, $100mm loan for Sierra Leone, and $80mm credit facility for Liberia) but with the "world community taking forever to respond," The IMF is happy to step in and secure some assets / lend over $100mm more to each nation to fill financing gaps.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Stock Buyback Shocker: Companies Using Secured Bank Loans To Repurchase Stock





"US lending to businesses is reaching record levels but banks are privately warning that the activity should not be seen as evidence of an economic recovery." And the stunner: "Much of the corporate lending is going to fund payouts to shareholders, finance acquisitions and fuel the domestic energy boom, bankers say, rather than to support companies’ organic growth."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Battle For Africa: Chinese Investments Vs US Military





We have been vociferously following the 'battle for Africa' - the last untapped Keynesian credit growth economic region of the world - for a few years. One common theme has emerged China and the US are aggressively chasing down 'assets' - especially in the equatorial region. However, as the following two charts indicate, the two nations are engaged in very difference tactics for that 'takeover' - China's investment versus US brute force and military intimidation (and fake vaccination programs).

 
Tyler Durden's picture

S&P Junks Puerto Rico On Liquidity Concerns, Warns About $1 Billion Collateral Call - Full Note





Following the evaluation of liquidity needs (and availability) for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, S&P has decided that "it doesn't warrant an investment-grade rating":

  • PUERTO RICO GO RATING CUT TO JUNK BY S&P, MAY BE CUT FURTHER
  • GOVT. DEVELOPMENT BANK FOR PUERTO RICO CUT TO BB FROM BBB-:S&P
  • PUERTO RICO GO RATING LOWERED TO 'BB+': S&P
  • PUERTO RICO REMAINS ON WATCH NEGATIVE FROM S&P

Both the G.O.s and the Development Bank have been cut. Note that 70% of muni mutual funds own this - and it is unclear if a junk rating forces (by mandate) funds to cover. Worst of all, S&P warns Puerto Rico could now face a $1 billion collateral call on short-term debt - the same waterfall collateral cascade that took down AIG.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Africa - China And Japan's Next Battleground?





We have long held that Africa is a crucial region of the world in the near future because there is no more incremental debt capacity at any level: sovereign, household, financial or corporate - in any other region.  As tensions between China and Japan multiply, there is an increasing battle for influence in other states. While China and Japan may look like they’re competing in Africa, the two countries are actually playing different games. Whereas Abe seems content to have Japanese businesses make profits, China is actively pursuing soft power on the continent.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The US Is Not Switzerland: Weighs Sanctions Against South Sudan





Despite telling us just yesterday that it would not take sides in the tensions in South Sudan...

*U.S. NOT TAKING SIDES IN S SUDAN: PSAKI

the US government is on the verge of deciding to... take sides. As Reuters reports, the United States is weighing targeted sanctions against South Sudan due to its leaders' failure to take steps to end a crisis that has brought the world's youngest nation to the brink of civil war. Africa, as we have discussed at length, remains the only region on earth with incremental debt capacity (and therefore growth in a Keynesian world) and so it is no surprise the US wants to get involved in yet another conflict.

 
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