SIFMA

Key Events In The Coming Week: CPI, Retail Sales And FOMC Minutes

The key economic releases this week are the CPI and retail sales reports on Friday. Additionally, the minutes from the September FOMC meeting will be released on Wednesday. There are several speaking engagements by Fed officials this week, including a speech by Chair Yellen on Sunday.

Is A US Default Imminent: Liquidation Panic Grips T-Bills Market

While the politicians and the mainstream media are playing down any concerns about the US debt ceiling, Treasury Bill market participants are seeing chaos as the yield curve has snapped across the Sept-Oct divide with panic-buying in bills that mature ahead of the September-end (Q3-end liquidity needs), and dumping of October bills.

US Equities: Unwinding The Yellen Leveraged Buyout

"Corporate credit spreads are the key indicator to watch, both in terms of the economy and the financial markets.  It’s a game of financial musical chairs. Ray Dalio, Janet Yellen and all of us are dancing.  When does the music stop?"

Key Events In The Coming Pre-Holiday Week

The key economic releases this week are durable goods and GDP on Thursday. Chair Yellen’s speech on the labor market on Monday afternoon is also likely to garner considerable attention.

Key Events In The Coming Thanksgiving-Shortened Week

The key economic releases this week in the Thanksgiving-shortened week are the durable goods report and new home sales on Wednesday. There are several scheduled speaking engagements from Fed officials this week. Minutes from the November FOMC meeting will be released on Wednesday.

Key Events In The Coming Week

In the US focus will be on the market's reaction to the second presidential debate, FOMC Minutes but also retail sales, import and producer prices and Michigan sentiment. We also hear from various Fed speakers throughout the week, and Chair Yellen gives a keynote speech on Friday.

Ben Inker: This Is The "Shocking Hole" That Will Be Blown In Equities If Rates Spike By 1.5%

"The most shocking hole that will be blown through people’s portfolios is if discount rates rise again fairly quickly. Even if the circumstance is one in which the global economy is doing well, the impact of a 1.5% increase in the discount rate on equities from here is a fall of over 30%, which would almost certainly be enough to swamp the earnings impact of the decent growth."

Goldman Warns Of "Upward Shock" To Rates, Hints At Trillions In Losses

According to Goldman, here is the unpleasant choice facing the world: continue slowly sinking into a deflationary singularity, coupled with ever greater systemic leverage which makes escape from the ZIRP/NIRP trap impossible as social unrest builds up and ultimately spills over into the streets, or unleash an inflationary impulse, one which crushes countless debt holders, leads to trillions in losses, and requires yet another consolidated bailout.... oh, and also more social unrest.

Days After Wells Fargo Admits Defrauding The Government, NY Fed Rewards It With Primary Dealer Status

Ten days ago, in the latest example of how criminal Wall Street behavior leads to zero prison time, Wells Fargo admitted that it deceived and defrauded the U.S. government.  Its punishment: a $1.2 billion settlement, one which will ultimately be paid by the bank's shareholders as no executives go to prison. And now, less than two weeks later it's time for Wells to get its reward: the NY Fed just announced it would grant Wells Fargo the much coveted Primary Dealer status.

 

Are 'Wealthy' Americans Scrambling To Find Cash To Cover Their Tax Bill?

Every year around this time, Americans face the certainty of tax time, and that means - in general - finding the cash to pay Uncle Sam his just deserts. This scramble for cash is seasonally evident in the variable-rate tax-exempt (Muni) bond market, where the typically wealthy stash their cash, as rates rise into tax time and fall after (as flows come and go). This year however, the scale of the outflows is enormous, spiking money-market fund rates from 1bp to 29bps...

U.S. Futures Slide, Crude Under $39 As Dollar Rallies For Fifth Day

Following yesterday's dollar spike which, which topped the longest rally in the greenback in one month, the prevailing trade overnight has been more of the same, and in the last session of this holiday shortened week we have seen the USD rise for the fifth consecutive day on concerns the suddenly hawkish Fed (at least as long as the S&P is above 2000) may hike sooner than expected, which in turn has pressured WTI below $39 earlier in the session, and leading to weakness across virtually all global risk assets.

Wall Street Drops The 'C' Word: Proclaims Junk Bond Risks Are Contained

To an economist, the economy can bear no recession. In times of heavy central bank activity, an economy can never be in recession. Those appear to be the only dynamic factors that drive economic interpretation in the mainstream. And they become circular in the trap of just these kinds of circumstances – the economy looks like it might fall into recession, therefore a central bank acts, meaning the economy will avoid recession; thus there will never be recession. The risks are all still there, and economists are still determined to downplay if not miss them entirely.