Silver ETFs

How Many Gold Bars Do London Vaults Hold

This week for the first time - in the name of "transparency" - the London Bullion Market Association unveiled that as at 31 March, 2017 there were 7,449 tonnes of gold, or 596,000 gold bars, valued at $298 billion sotred in the vaults around London as well as $19 billion in silver. Here are the full details of what was unveiled.

GoldCore's picture

Why is someone stocking up (see charts) on all that silver? Silver ore in mines is getting less-rich. Global silver production fall. Another massive deficit this year. Solar demand could be key. Silver could go ballistic

GoldCore's picture

Silver had its biggest quarterly rise in nearly 30 years in the first three months of 2016 as ETF investors, buying of silver coins (now VAT free in UK and EU) and bars and speculators in the futures market pushed prices higher. Silver prices are likely to rise further as there is “supply trouble brewing” as strong industrial and investment demand are confronted by declining supply. 

Something Just Broke In The U.S. Silver Market

After looking over all the figures, it seems as if something broke in the U.S. Silver Market this year. By that, we mean the normal supply and demand forces no longer make sense.

Anyone Who Believes The COMEX Numbers Is Very Naive (They Are Much Worse!)

Following our detailing the Comex gold futures to deliverable physical gold ratio that is now north of 200:1, several correspondents noted that "they are probably bluffing...based on JPMorgan's previous lies, the real number is likely significantly higher than 200:1." History tells us that all Ponzi schemes and market interventions fail, and it appears we are on the cusp of a massive failure in the scheme to cover up the truth about the precious metals market.

Sprott: "Manipulation Of Gold By Central Banks Cannot Continue In 2014"

A common argument that has been made to explain the precipitous decline of the price of precious metals in 2013 (in spite of the significat demand for the physical bullion) is of investors’ disenchantment with gold and silver, which had been piling up in exchange traded products as a way for investors to gain exposure to the metals. However if redemptions are a symptom of investors' disenchantment with precious metals as an investment, shouldn't silver have suffered the same dramatic redemptions fate as gold? Indeed it should have, but we think the reason silver ETFs were not raided like gold was that Central Banks do not have a silver supply problem, they have a gold problem...