SocGen

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All You Need To Know About The China Boom-Bust Cycle In One Chart





If anyone is still confused about the not so subtle dynamics between markets and monetary policy in China, or the country's bipolar, and ever more frequent boom and bust cycles, you won't be after seeing this chart from Socgen.

 
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Kyle Bass Was Right: SocGen Does The Math On China's Staggering NPL Problem, Issues Dire Warning





"As SOE restructuring progresses, it will also become more apparent that Chinese banks need to be rescued. We estimate that the total losses in the banking sector could reach CNY8 trillion, equivalent to more than 60% of commercial banks’ capital, 50% of fiscal revenues and 12% of GDP."

 
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Spain Sells 3x Oversubscribed 50-Year Bond





Following a scramble by European nations to issue ultra long-dated government paper, which saw France and Belgium sell 50-year bonds last month, while Ireland and Belgium went all the way and issued century bonds, with even Switzerland locking in 42-year paper yesterday, moments ago Spain was the latest to extend maturities all the way to 2066 when it sold €3 billion in 50 year bonds at Midswaps+50. According to MarketNews, the issue was over 3 times oversubscribed with the orderbook closing at €10.5 billion.

 
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Albert Edwards: "Let Me Tell You How This All Ends"





The dollar's recent rapid slide has been accompanied by a constant backdrop of dovish cooing from the Fed. Until this week, SocGen's Albert Edwards notes that both equity and commodity markets had embraced the weak dollar as the elixir to solve all their ills. That relief, however, has now proved fleeting as fear of weak economic activity has reasserted its influence on investors. The weak dollar, Edwards warns, should be seen as merely a shuffling of deckchairs on the Titanic before the global economy sinks below the icy waves.

 
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What Wall Street Expects From Today's Payrolls Report And How To Trade It





In what may be one of the least relevant payroll reports in a long time as the Fed already knows the labor market is doing better quantiatively (qualitatively it has been all about low-paying jobs gaining at the expense of higher paying manufacturing and info-tech positions) and as has further demonstrated it is no longer jobs data dependent, here is what Wall Street consensus expects: total payrolls +200,000, down from 215K in March; a 4.9% unemployment rate; average hourly earnings rising 0.3% (last 0.3%) M/M and 2.4% Y/Y (last 2.3%); on labor force participation of 63%.

 
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Debt Is Growing Faster Than Cash Flow By The Most On Record





Net debt growth skyrocketing nearly 30% y/y, while EBITDA has been contracting for the past year. In fact, as SocGen shows below, the difference in the growth rate between these two most critical data series is now over 35% - the biggest deficit in over 20 years.

 
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Malaysian Ringgit Tumbles After 1MDB Default Raises Spectre Of Sovereign Failure





Update: after widening by 2bps earlier, Malaysia CDS is now +4 at 167bps and starting to move as macro "analysts" finally catch up on the entire story and comprehend the implications.

Malaysian CDS rose to near 3-month highs and the Ringgit has spiked over 300 pips - back near recent lows - after the Malaysian slushfund government investment fund 1MDB is reportedly in default. This is exactly the scenario we laid out last week that initially sent the currency lower and CDS higher, as the Abu Dhabi sovereign wealth fund has by all appearances started a potential waterfall default on Malaysian sovereign debt (due to cross-default triggers at the sovereign).

 
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China's Other Big Problem - Porkflation





For those who believe that broad-based stimulus is coming to save the world from China (via RRR cuts or even pure QE) - as opposed to the hole-filling credit pump they just supported - think again. As we warned last year, this is 'western' thinking as the go to policy of the rest of the world's central banks has been - put on pants, print money, paper over cracks, proclaim victory. However, in China there is one big problem with this... stoking inflation... and most crucially the social unrest concerns when suddenly a nation of newly minted equity - and now bond - losers can no longer afford their pork - which is surging to record highs.

 
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US Economy - Ongoing Distortions





The economy’s capital structure remains imbalanced as a result of the enormous amount of monetary pumping since 2008 (total TMS-2 growth since then: approx. 128%). There is a limit to this though, even if it cannot be quantified. What can be stated though is that the greater the boom, the greater the eventual bust usually is. There are now more and more indications that a decisive inflection point may be quite near.

 
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With Everyone Selling Stocks, Who Is Buying? Goldman Explains





"We expect corporations will purchase $450 billion of US equities in 2016 and will remain the largest source of US equity demand."

 
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SocGen: "Now We Know Why The Fed Desperately Wants To Avoid A Drop In Equity Markets"





"The catalyst for a balance sheet crisis is rarely the affordability of interest rates, so a 25bp rise in Fed rates is neither here nor there. Credit market risk is about assessing the likelihood of getting your money back. As such asset prices (i.e. equity markets) and asset price risk (i.e. equity volatility) are far bigger concerns. So all you need for a balance sheet crisis is declining equity markets, a phenomenon the Fed appears desperate to avoid. Now we know why."

 
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Japan Says G-20 Accord Barring FX Devaluations Does Not "Rule Out Intervention" In The Yen





Earlier today, Japan's government spokesman Suga came as close as possible to admitting that there was in fact a tacit "Shanghai Accord" agreement when he said that the Group of 20's agreement to avoid competitive currency devaluation "does not mean Japan cannot intervene in response to one-sided currency moves." It got better: in an interview with Reuters Suga added that Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's comment to the Wall Street Journal last week that countries should avoid "arbitrary intervention," was misunderstood and does not rule out intervention for Japan, Suga said.

 
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For Albert Edwards, This Is The "One Failsafe Indicator" Of An Inevitable Recession





Despite risk assets enjoying a few weeks in the sun our failsafe recession indicator has stopped flashing amber and turned to red. Newly released US whole economy profits data show a gut wrenching slump. Whole economy profits never normally fall this deeply without a recession unfolding. Historically all recessions are effectively caused by slumps in business investment driven by a profits downturn.

 
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What SocGen Thinks Happens Next: "The Longer The Fed Feeds This Game, The Bigger The Mess Will Be"





"The Fed is increasingly worried about these ever-weaker fundamentals, yet asset markets seem more preoccupied with the omnipresence of the Fed put than downside cyclical risk. This then perhaps points to the bigger underlying concern for investors, the overwhelming build-up of leverage in the system. For in the absence of sensible drivers of returns (i.e. sensible interest rates, EPS growth etc.), investors and corporates resort to leverage.... With miserly rates of return on offer in fixed income markets, investors are leveraging up. The longer the Fed feeds this game, the bigger the mess when the inevitable downswing comes along."

 
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Japan Goes Full Krugman: Plans Un-Depositable, Non-Cash "Gift-Certificate" Money Drop To Young People





The Swiss, the Finns, and the Ontarians may get their 'Universal Basic Income' but the Japanese are about to turn the Spinal Tap amplifier of extreme monetary experimentation to 11. Sankei reports, with no sourcing, that the Japanese government plans to unleash "vouchers" or "gift certificates" to low-income young people to stimulate the "conspicuous decline" in consumption among young people. The handouts may not be deposited, thus combining helicopter money (inflationary) and fully electronic currency (implicit capital controls and tracking of spending).

 
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