Sovereign Debt

Tyler Durden's picture

Which Countries Have The Highest Default Risk: A Global CDS Heatmap





Sweden beats USA and Germany as the least likely to default on its bonds but at the other end of the global sovereign risk spectrum lie two socialist utopias - Venezuela (CDS just shy of 6000bps) and Greece (CDS around 1800bps) are the nations most likely to default.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

"The European Project Was Always Bound To Fail" - Europe Without The Union





Any project attempting to fuse these disparate cultures into one monolithic state over the course of just 70 years was by its very nature doomed. It would inevitably encounter insurmountable levels of nationalistic resistance, and eventually the project would stall. That is the point at which we now find ourselves.

 
Phoenix Capital Research's picture

Draghis Bazooka Is Loaded With Blanks





Wake up world, Draghi's promises are just bluffs. The ECB cannot generate growth.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Printing Press: A Great Way To Fool People





"The reason that we’re still here, when we really should have fallen apart based on how much debt there was out there, and various other measures of instability, is that a printing press has turned out to be a great tool for fooling people...but in the longer term gold is a beneficiary of the instability that necessarily flows from borrowing too much money"

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Stocks Tumble After Fed Plans Too-Big-To-Fail Bank Counterparty Risk Cap





US financials are tumbling after The Fed proposed a rule that would limit banks with $500 bln or more of assets from having net credit exposure to a “major counterparty” in excess of 15% of the lender’s tier 1 capital. Bloomberg reports that The Fed's governors plan to vote today on the proposal. The implications of this are significant in that it will force some banks to unwind exposures and delever against one another (most notably with potential affect the repo market which governs much of the liquidity transmission mechanisms). Guggenheim's Jaret Seiberg warns the proposal is likely to be "stringent," though less onerous than the Dec 2011 proposal... which Goldman Sachs more specifically warned that it could destroy 300,000 jobs.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Capitalism Requires World War





Capitalism requires World War because Capitalism requires profit and cannot afford the unemployed. The point is capitalism could afford social democracy after the rate of profit was restored thanks to the depression of the 1930’s and the physical destruction of capital during WW2. The underlying nature of Capitalism is cyclical.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Furious Rally Fizzles Overnight As Futures Follow Oil Lower





Following yesterday's torrid 2.4% March opening rally, which resulted in the biggest S&P gain since January and the best first day of March in history on what was initially seen as very bad news, and then reinterpreted as great news, overnight futures have taken a breather, and erased a modest overnight continuation rally to track the price of oil lower.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Keynesian Skeptics Ask "Can Binge Drinking Really Cure Alcoholism?"





Central bankers are like alcoholics - drunk on stupidity and arrogance; and, like a suffering alcoholic, reticent to address the real problem.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Wedbush Goes There: "Beware The Panics And Crashes Of March"





As if several markets tumbles and heartstopping short squeezes in just the first two months of 2016 have not been enough to turn professional traders' hair prematurely gray and drive all retail daytraders permanently out of the "market", here is a warning from Wedbush's otherwise quite somber repo market analyst, Scott Skyrm, according to whom the volatility is only just starting.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

"Everything Changes At Zero" - Investors "Obligated" To Fight The Fed





The financial world is growing increasingly crazy-looking. What is alarming is that central banks are brandishing these new tools without any viable evidence or theory that they will even work. This itself presupposes that central banks have any idea of what “work” might even mean in this brave new context. It used to be said, ‘Don’t fight the Fed’. Now as investors, if we want to protect our capital, we are all obligated to fight the Fed, and its international cousins, with whatever we have.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Silver Linings: Keynesian Central Banking Is Heading For A Massive Repudiation





Inflation targeting has been a giant cover story for a monumental power grab. The academics who grabbed the power had no idea what they were doing in the financial markets that they have now saturated with financial time bombs. When these FEDs (financial explosive devices) erupt in the months and years ahead, the central bankers will face a day of reckoning. And they will surely be found wanting. The immense social damage from the imploding bubbles dead ahead will be squarely on them.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Chilling Ways The Current Global Economy Echoes The 1930s Depression Era





The imbalances that low rates and elasticity produce may “return us to the modern-day equivalent of the divisive competitive devaluations of the interwar years; and, ultimately, [trigger] an epoch-defining seismic rupture in policy regimes, back to an era of trade and financial protectionism and, possibly, stagnation combined with inflation.”

 
Tyler Durden's picture

"You Should Be Very Worried, You Should Be Prepared" Warns Jim Rogers





"[Central Banks] think they are smarter than the market," exclaims billionaire investor Jim Rogers, "they are not!... the inevitable consequence of disastrous easy-money policy from central planners is war..."

 
GoldCore's picture

Euro Bond Crisis Returns As Germany Pushes Euro Sovereign Debt Bail-in Clause





European Banks holding European sovereign debt may have to take haircuts and be part of bail in plans should that same debt default, according to a plan being pursued by German government advisers. In another attempt to shelter German tax payers from the largess and excess of fellow European neighbouring countries' national banks, the move could trigger a run on billions of euro of sovereign debt of said banks. In an article penned by the Telegraph's Ambrose-Evans Pritchard, one of the council's dissenting members describes the plan as the "fastest way to break up the Eurozone".

 
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