Sovereign Debt

Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: The Big Reset, Part 2





The US wants its dollar system to prevail for as long as possible. It therefore has every interest in preventing a ‘rush out of dollars into gold’. By selling (paper) gold, bankers have been trying in the last few decades to keep the price of gold under control. This war on gold has been going on for almost one hundred years, but it gained traction in the 1960's with the forming of the London Gold Pool. Just like the London Gold Pool failed in 1969, the current manipulation scheme of gold (and silver prices) cannot be maintained for much longer.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

"Endless Growth" Is the Plan & There Is No Plan B





After five years of aggressive Federal Reserve and government intervention in our monetary and financial systems, it's time to ask: Where are we? The "plan," such as it has been, is to let future growth sweep everything under the rug. To print some money, close their eyes, cross their fingers, and hope for the best. On that, we give them an "A" for wishful thinking – and an "F" for actual results. If we take a closer look at the projections, the idea that we're going to grow even remotely into a gigantic future that will consume all entitlement shortfalls within its cornucopian maw becomes all but laughable. Of course, the purpose of this exercise is not to make fun of anyone, nor to mock any particular beliefs, but to create an actionable understanding of the true nature of where we really are and what you should be doing about it.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: January 22





  • Winter Storm Expected to Make Northeast Commutes Harder  (BBG)
  •  Invasion of Spanish Builders Angers France Struggling to Compete  (BBG)
  • Toronto mayor, caught ranting on video, admits drinking a 'little bit" (Reuters)
  • IBM's Hardware Woes Accelerate in Fourth Quarter (WSJ)
  • Sharp Divisions Come to Fore as Peace Talks on Syria Begin (NYT)
  • Afghanistan cracks down on advertising in favor of U.S. troops (Reuters)
  • Microsoft CEO Search Rattles Boards From Ford to Ericsson (BBG)
  • Banks Sit Out Riskier Deals (WSJ)
  • Netflix Seen Reporting U.S. Web Users Reach 33.1 Million (BBG)
 


Tyler Durden's picture

Equity Rebound Continues Into Day Two: New All Time Highs Straight Ahead





Day two of the bounce from the biggest market drop in months is here, driven once again by weak carry currencies, with the USDJPY creeping up as high as 104.50 overnight before retracing some of the gains, and of course, the virtually non-existant volume. Whatever the reason don't look now but market all time highs are just around the corner, and the Nasdaq is back to 14 year highs. Stocks traded higher since the get-go in Europe, with financials leading the move higher following reports that European banks will not be required in upcoming stress tests to adjust their sovereign debt holdings to maturity to reflect current values. As a result, peripheral bond yield spreads tightened, also benefiting from good demand for 5y EFSF syndication, where price guidance tightened to MS+7bps from initial MS+9bps. Also of note, Burberry shares in London gained over 6% and advanced to its highest level since July, after the company posted better than expected sales data. Nevertheless, the FTSE-100 index underperformed its peers, with several large cap stocks trading ex-dividend today. Going forward, market participants will get to digest the release of the latest Empire Manufacturing report, PPI and DoE data, as well as earnings by Bank of America.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Why Italian And Spanish Bonds Are Near Record Low Yields (In One Greater-Fool Chart)





As global central bankers appear set on a game of inter-continental reach-around, the Japanese - printing press handle in hand - have taken the lead. For those wondering why EURJPY is so high and why, despite an endless stream of disappointingly near-record-bad macro and micro data in Spain and Italy, yields are near record lows... wonder no more. As Reuters' Jamie McGeever reports, the Japanese bought Spanish and Italian government debt at the fastest pace in 5 years. As Abe increases his militaristic presence in Asia, perhaps his 'promise' to buy any and all European peripheral debt is just the handshake he needs to pressure China (through its largest export market).

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Spanish Lending Rates Soar To Highest Since 2008





Despite sovereign bond yields plumbing new record lows and the Prime Minister proclaiming (against Draghi's advice) that the nation has turned the corner and is out of the crisis; Spain's record unemployment and record loan delinquency is showing up in a major credit-creation-crushing way for small businesses. As Bloomberg's Jonathan Tyce reports, Spanish new business lending rates just experienced the largest 2-month surge in over a decade to their highest since 2008. At 4.04%, new business loans trade over 300bps above two-year sovereign debt (and are diverging) as the efforts of Europe's 'whatever it takes' central bank are being entirely wasted in terms of reaching the Keynesian growth-driving economy. We suspect this surge will once again raise talk of a rate-cut (and expose the impotence of the ECB's transmission mechanisms).

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Hedge Fund Slams Portuguese Bonds With 64 Page Slideshow





Traditionally, hedge fund managers that go public with multi-page slideshows bashing this or that asset, usually end up in tears (see Bill Ackman) as long as said asset is not some microcap, illiquid stock. That, however, has not stopped David Salanic of Tortus Capital Management to not only mass distribute a presentation highlighting his latest and greatest short idea but to create a website that implicitly highlights his investment thesis. The site in question is called http://rehabilitatingportugal.com/, and the asset that Salanic is bearish to quite bearish on, are Portuguese bonds.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Forbes Reveals Its "Top 30 Under 30" In Finance





With Trader Monthly magazine having, ironically, gone out business long ago, all those traders whose egos demanded that their insider trading connections put them at least in one of the iconic "Top X under X" league tables, pardon, rankings, had to bide their time in expectation of one day when their prowess to frontrun others or move markets with repeated calls to 555-7617 (with or without references to Anacott Steel) would be appreciated by such sterling Wall Street "experts" as Anthony Scaramucci. Well, for this year's crop of some 30 traders under 30, the day has arrived. And while Forbes may not be Trader Monthly, the amusement, the hubris and the behind the scenes dealing to appear in such a list, sure are still the same...

 


Reggie Middleton's picture

The Future of Money is Here: Zero Trust Digital Currency Contracts





From this point on I start demonstrating to those who can't see the benefits of smart digital money over dumb fiat currencies. Now, you can short bitcoin and hedge against volaitlity using same tools the big boys use for USD/EUR/CNY, etc.

 


rcwhalen's picture

Nom de Plumber | Volcker Rule Implementation: Mission Impossible?





Because infinite permutations of risk factor movements can cause a specific asset price movement, no definitive anchor points will arise to bootstrap that mandated P&L attribution

 


Tyler Durden's picture

2013 Greatest Hits: Presenting The Most Popular Posts Of The Past Year





The fifth anniversary of Zero Hedge is just around the corner, and so, for the fifth year in a row we continue our tradition of summarizing what you, our readers, found to be the most relevant, exciting, and actionable news of the year, determined objectively by the number of page views. Those eager for a brief stroll down memory lane of prior years can do so at their leisure, by going back in time to our top articles of 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012. For everyone else, without further ado, these are the articles that readers found to be the most popular posts of the past 365 days...

 


Tyler Durden's picture

2013 Year In Review





Every year, David Collum writes a detailed "Year in Review" synopsis full of keen perspective and plenty of wit. This year's is no exception. The 89-page tour-de-force is a must-read this holiday season for perspective on where we have been and where we are going. From Krugman to the abuse of civil liberties, from gold to muni bankruptices, and from Student debt bubble to Cyprus and beyond, Collum covers it all.

 


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