Sovereign Debt

16% Of Europe's IG Corporate Bonds Now Yield Below 0%

In addition to negative yielding sovereign debt, it's now time to also look at corporate debt, because the amount of euro-denominated investment-grade corporate bonds with negative yields has tripled over the last six weeks, a move accelerated by their inclusion in the European Central Bank's quantitative easing programme. Specifically around 16%, or 440 billion euros, of the 2.8 trillion euros of these bonds now yield less than zero, up from around 5% at the start of May, according to Tradeweb data.

Tyranny Of The PhDs

Sad to say, you haven’t seen nothin’ yet. The world is drifting into financial entropy, and it is going to get steadily worse. That’s because the emerging stock market slump isn’t just another cyclical correction; it’s the opening phase of the end-game. That is, the end game of the PhD Tyranny.

Royal Mint Allows British Pensioners To 'Save' In Gold Bullion

Given the current uncertainty surrounding Brexit, the news this week that Britain's Royal Mint will join the current providers of gold to self-invested pension savers in the UK (SIPPS) - allowing British pensioners a tax efficient way of investing in bullion - is fascinating. While gold bullion has been allowed in SIPPs since 2006, this is the first time the Royal Mint has allowed its higher-quality bullion to be bought for pensions.

Here Is What A Work Week Looks Like For A Public Employee In Europe

If you're ever feeling overworked, and don't already live in one of these European countries, perhaps now is the time to consider relocating and finding employment in the public sector (at least while the ECB is going to monetize all of the sovereign debt that is).

With Daily Record Lows, Here Is A Chart OF German Bund Yields Since 1977

Two stunning statistics: according to Commerzbank almost two-thirds of all German sovereign debt outstanding now yields below minus-0.4%, which makes it ineligible for central-bank purchases. Additionally, as DB adds, Bund yield across the whole curve has gone negative for the first time.

Deutsche Bank's Shocking ECB Rant: Warns Of Social Unrest And Another Great Depression

"In the 1920s the Reichsbank thought it could have 2,000 printing presses running day and night to finance government spending without creating inflation. Around the same time the Federal Reserve allowed more than a third of US deposits to be destroyed via bank failures, in the belief that banking crises where self-correcting. The Great Depression followed.... Today the behaviour of the European Central Bank suggests that it too has gone awry."

Historic Milestone: Negative Yielding Debt Surpasses $10 Trillion For The First Time

The world passed a historic milestone in the past week when according to Fitch negative-yielding government debt rose above $10 trillion for the first time, which as the FT adds envelops an increasingly large part of the financial markets "after being fuelled by central bank stimulus and a voracious investor appetite for sovereign paper." It also means that almost a third of all global government debt now has a negative yield.

Global Markets Flat, Coiled Ahead Of Today's Risk Events: OPEC And The ECB

There are just two drivers setting the pace for today's risk mood: the OPEC meeting in Vienna which started a few hours ago, and the ECB's announcement as well as Mario Draghi's press statement due out just one hour from now. Both are expected to not reveal any major surprises, with OPEC almost certainly unable to implement a production freeze while the ECB is expected to remain on hold and provide some more details on its corporate bond buying program, although there is some modest risk of upside surprise in either case.

"An Unusual Number Of Known Unknowns" - These Are The Key Event Risks In June

In June there will be "an unusual number of known unknowns from several sources. June 2016 is a month in which the number of event risks is particularly high. In our baseline scenarios we do not see market upsets, but the potential is there: Japanese fiscal policy; meetings of the ECB, Fed and BoJ; new ECB policy implementation; a German Constitutional Court ruling; the UK referendum; elections in Spain; and a decision on the FTT are all thrown into the mix."

State Of The States: New Jersey's Problems Are Not "Mathematically Solvable"

While the warning flags are raging in Illinois and Connecticut, JPMorgan's Michael Cembalest states that New Jersey's problems are "not mathematically solvable." The stunning admission from a status-quo-sustaining bank that is “very focused on the total indebtedness of US states," should be worrisome enough but as Cembalest explains the answer to a debt problem is not always piling up more debt - "when debt reaches a certain level, the can kicking is over and difficult decisions need to be made;" the issue is to address the root of the problem, which can be a delicate and at times politically incorrect topic.

Trumped! Washington's Fiscal Hypocrisy Is Too Rich For Words

You have to love it when one of Donald Trump’s wild pitches sends the beltway hypocrites into high dudgeon. But his rumination about negotiating a discount on the Federal debt was priceless. No sooner did the 'unschooled' Trump mention out loud what is already the official policy of the US government than a beltway chorus of fiscal house wreckers commenced screaming like banshees about the sanctity of Uncle Sam’s credit promises.