Special Situations

Tyler Durden's picture

These Are The Stocks "The Big Short's" Michael Burry Owned As Of December 31





We can only hope that Burry managed to sell out of his CYH stake (and, ironically, his various bank holdings) which he held just days after the Big Short hit the theaters in December ahead of today's devastation, or there may not be a Big Short sequel.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Something Unexpected Happened When A Distressed Credit Fund Tried To Liquidate





In May 2015, Warwick's European Distressed & Special Situations Credit Fund liquidated after investors submitted redemption requests amounting to 90% of the fund’s assets. But something unexpected happened" "the problem" as HFA writes, is that "the fund’s remaining assets — encompassing debt and equity positions in Fitness First, New Gulf Resources, Oasis Holdings and Punch Taverns — are too illiquid to be sold."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

"The Bankers Have Gone Through This Before. They Know How It Ends, And It’s Not Pretty"





Oil companies have sold $61.5 billion in stocks and bonds since January as oil prices have tumbled. However, the fees geneated are a tiny fraction of the bank's real exposure to the energy sector, at over $150 billion. So have the banks learned their lesson?  "The bankers have gone through this before,” says Oscar Gruss’s Meyer. “They know how it works out in the end, and it’s not pretty." Then again, perhaps banks are just sailing on an ocean of liquidity allowing them to postpone the day of Mark to Market reckoning, especially since this time, everyone is in it together....

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Hedge Fund Horrors: First Einhorn Has Worst Month Since 2008, Now Paulson Getting Redeemed





"The wealth management arm of Bank of America Merrill Lynch is liquidating its clients’ money from one of Paulson & Company’s funds and has put another fund under "heightened review,'" NY Times reports. As it turns out, this was not the year to be long Greece and Puerto Rico. 

 
Sprott Money's picture

Chris Mayer: No Big Theme in US Stocks, Just “Special Situations and Quirky Opportunities” (Sprott’s Thoughts)





There’s a big macro theme playing out in Europe – a once soft economic environment that allowed lots of inefficiency is becoming tougher and forcing companies to restructure, says Chris Mayer, author of Capital & Crisis and Mayer’s Special Situations.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

On The Looming Wall Of Chinese Defaults, Restructuring Firm Warns "You Know It's Coming"





The news this week of China's largest corporate bankruptcy - Haixin Iron & Steel Group - amid crashing iron ore and steel prices was followed by analysts noting it "will be followed by others," as the major flaw of producers of iron ore, the most traded commodity after oil, is they tend to be "over-bullish." Distressed debt funds are starting to circle in preparation for what they expect to be a bloodbath as Bloomberg reports, bad debts in China are well underestimated because authorities persist in propping up weak companies and bailing out local investors, according to DAC Management, "we've yet to see it because if you look at corporate defaults, they keep getting covered by the government. At some point, they can’t cover every single one." Most worryingly though, as KPMG points out, "when you see restructuring advisers getting hired by SOEs... you know it's coming."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Lessons In Investment Warfare





There is a war being conducted out there in the financial markets. A war between debtors and creditors, between governments and taxpayers, between banks and depositors, between the errors of the past and the hopes of the future. How can investors end up on the winning side ? History would seem to have the answers. We would argue today that central bank bubble-blowing has made the entire market high-risk, with a broad consensus that with interest rates at 300-year lows and bonds hysterically overpriced and facing the prospect of interest rate rises to boot, stocks are now "the only game in town". If history is any guide, the identity of the losers seems to be self-evident.

 
Capitalist Exploits's picture

No Thanks, Call Me When You're Dead





In investing sometimes dead makes more sense than alive...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

How Phil Falcone Won The Battle Against Goldman, But Lost The War (Or How Not To Manipulate Bonds)





As part of the SEC's consent order with Harbinger's Phil Falcone, we learned that in addition to the previously well-known stuff Falcone was engaging in (using the fund as his taxpaying piggybank, giving preferential gating terms to "friends and family", etc), perhaps what really scuttled the once legendary hedge fund manager is what ended up being an outright war with Goldman, when back in 2006 Harbinger tried to not only take the other side of a short bet put on by Goldman, but literally squeezed Goldman and its clients into absolutely misery with the result millions in profit to Falcone and unknown losses to Goldie. And as one knows, you never fight Goldman and win, without ultimately losing everything.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Phil Falcone Done: To Pay $18 Million, Admit Guilt, Agree To 5 Year Bar





SEC SAYS FALCONE CONSENTS TO BAN FROM ASSOCIATION WITH ANY BROKER, DEALER, INVESTMENT ADVISER, OTHER ENTITIES, WITH RIGHT TO REAPPLY AFTER FIVE YEARS

 
Asia Confidential's picture

Why Investors Have Got It Wrong On China





Many high profile investors, economists and companies got burned during China's recent woes. We look at the errors they made and what you can learn from them.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: June 18





  • Obama Says Bernanke Fed Term Lasting ‘Longer Than He Wanted’ (Bloomberg)
  • Merkel Critical Of Japan's Credit Policy In Meeting With Abe (Nikkei)
  • China Wrestles With Banks' Pleas for Cash (WSJ)
  • Biggest protests in 20 years sweep Brazil (Brazil)
  • Pena Nieto Confident 75-Year Pemex Oil Monopoly to End This Year (Bloomberg)
  • G8 leaders seek common ground on tax (FT)
  • Putin faces isolation over Syria as G8 ratchets up pressure (Reuters)
  • Former Trader Is Charged in U.K. Libor Probe (WSJ) - yup: it was all one 33 year old trader's fault
  • Draghi Says ECB Has ‘Open Mind’ on Non-Standard Measures (BBG)
  • Loeb Raises His Sony Stake, Drive for Entertainment IPO (WSJ)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

David Rosenberg On "Shared Sacrifice"





Sweeping changes are taking place at the state level as pension trustees and legislatures push for higher monthly contributions to pension plans, a later retirement age and lower annual cost-of-living adjustments for current and retired workers. Unions (those that don't make Twinkles, in any event), are making the concessions because they can see the future absent shared sacrifice — the termination of defined benefit plans in favour of defined contribution plans. Be that as it may, employee contributions are going up — a de facto tax hike. And this will work directly against any upturn in consumer spending when you consider that the state and local government sector employ nearly 20 million people or 15% of the national job pie. So we will have less government, fewer entitlements and more whisperings that it isn't just the $250,000+ high-income households that are going to experience tax increases and diminished disposable income growth. This is shared sacrifice. To think that the nation could have ever gone to war in Iraq and in Afghanistan under the Bush regime, putting our troops at great risk not to mention the emotional scars on their families, while here at home civilians would be allowed to enjoy tax cuts and a debt-financed consumption binge.... One has to wonder what events could provide positive momentum to GDP growth, push corporate earnings to record highs as the consensus predicts as early as next year, or generate any lasting inflation, for that matter.  It's the people that make these pricing decisions. Businesses can only price up to what consumers are willing to pay. It is households that determine whether or not we have inflation, not some bureaucrat in Washington who believes he has control over some printing press.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Is Bernanke Betting The Ranch On A US Demographic Renaissance





The BOJ pioneered QE in March 2001, with two objectives. The first was to eliminate deflation, which took hold in the mid-1990s; and the second was to shore up Japan’s fragile financial system. Did it work? Yes, for the second objective - the BOJ arguably bought time for banks tied up in NPL disposal; but, unfortunately, QE was not successful in combating deflation. The BOJ’s intended policy transmission mechanism was so-called portfolio rebalancing. Ideally, the buildup in banks’ deposits at the BOJ that earned no return (but carried zero risk) should have prompted banks to seek higher returns (with higher risk) and thus increase their lending. But portfolio rebalancing did not kick in for several reasons; most of which are the same as are occurring in the US currently. More fundamentally, however, Japan's demographics hindered any hopes of a capex-driven recovery - and policy can do little to affect that. While the US faces a less dismal demographic picture, the Japanese experience highlights that other policies (as Bernanke himself admits) are required for any sustained benefit in the real economy.

 
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