Stress Test

Tyler Durden's picture

Dull Overnight Session Set To Become Even Duller Day Session





Those hoping for a slew of negative news to push stocks much higher today will be disappointed in this largely catalyst-free day. So far today we have gotten only the ECB's weekly 3y LTRO announcement whereby seven banks will repay a total of €1.1 billion from both LTRO issues, as repayments slow to a trickle because the last thing the ECB, which was rumored to be inquiring banks if they can handle negative deposit rates earlier in the session, needs is even more balance sheet contraction. The biggest economic European economic data point was the EU construction output which contracted for a fifth consecutive month, dropping -1.7% compared to -0.3% previously, and tumbled 7.9% from a year before.  Elsewhere, Spain announced trade data for March, which printed at yet another surplus of €0.63 billion, prompted not so much by soaring exports which rose a tiny 2% from a year ago to €20.3 billion but due to a collapse in imports of 15% to €19.7 billion - a further sign that the Spanish economy is truly contracting even if the ultimate accounting entry will be GDP positive. More importantly for Spain, the country reported a March bad loan ratio - which has been persistently underreproted - at 10.5% up from 10.4% in February. We will have more to say on why this is the latest and greatest ticking timebomb for the Eurozone shortly.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Ben Bernanke Speaks - Live Webcast





The Chairman is about to take the lectern to discuss bank structure and competition at the SIFI conference at the Chicago Fed. His prepared remarks are likely to be a little less exciting than the Q&A where the world will be watching for the words "buy, buy, buy", "mission accomplished", or "taper". Charles Evans will be his lead out man. Finally, since Bernanke will be discussing shadow banking, or the source of some $30 trillion in shadow money always ignored by Keynesians, Monetarists and Magic Money Tree (MMT) growers, a topic we have discussed over the past three years, here is the TBAC's own summary on how Modern Money really works.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Of Spain's "Bad Bank" Foreclosed Properties, Only 6,000 Of 83,000 Units Have Tenants





Most of the SAREB's loans are linked to finished properties, for which it might be easier to find a buyer, but 4.3 percent are for unfinished developments and nearly 10 percent are for empty lots, for which there is little or no demand. Nearly all of the foreclosed properties in its portfolio are empty, including apartment blocks far outside big cities. Only 6,000 of nearly 83,000 housing units have tenants.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Full Frontal Of Slovenia's "Non-Performing" Moans





Ever since Cyprus hit the headlines, Slovenia has been close behind. Another small European nation with a banking system that dwarfs its GDP (though not on the scale of Cyprus). However, as we noted previously, it is not the size that matters, it is the precedent. The European leadership are desperate for the 'template' used in Cyprus - of haircutting all the way through the capital structure - not be used in Slovenia for fear the real world will see through their jawboning facade. Chatter continues that Slovenia can get out of this on their own - in some magical government-guaranteed reacharound - but, just as in Cyprus (where Non-Performing MLoans reaching 30-40% was the trigger for their avalanche), so Slovenia is there now. While the 'average' is around 14% NPLs, the large state-controlled banks had over 30% NPLs at the end of 2012. The need for in excess of EUR1bn in recapitalization alone - though stress test results have been kept secret - and as the FT's op-ed notes, in order to appease global investors' fear that lessons have not been learned, government money (read taxpayer) should not be the first option, creditors should be bailed-in. With Slovenia CDS stuck at six-month wides, it appears the market remains far more nervous either way.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: April 9





  • JPMorgan Leads Job Cuts as Banks Seek to Bolster Profit (BBG)
  • North Koreans don't show for work at Kaesong factory park (Reuters), as NK urges foreigners to leave South Korea (FT)
  • Lisbon Struggles to Close New Budget Gap (WSJ)
  • Portugal may face delay to bailout funds (FT)
  • Putin Squeezing Out UBS to Deutsche Bank Using Oligarchs (BBG)
  • China's Xi Says Fast Growth Over (WSJ)
  • Spain’s PM wants more powers for ECB (FT)
  • Bernanke Says Interest on Reserves Would Be Main Tightening Tool (BBG)
  • Bird Flu Claims 7th Victim in China (WSJ)
  • Texting While Flying Linked to Commercial Helicopter Crash (BBG)... No, Bernanke wasn't the pilot
 


Tyler Durden's picture

Union: One Survived; One May Not





One of the most interesting issues of what has happened in Cyprus is where was the problem three weeks ago? There was not a mention, not a hint of anything that was wrong. All of the banks in Cyprus had passed each and every European bank stress test. The numbers reported out by the ECB and the Bank for International Settlements indicated nothing and everything reported by any official organization in the European Union pointed to a stable and sound fiscal and monetary policy and conditions. The IMF, who monitors these things as well, did not have Cyprus or her banks on any kind of watch list. In just two weeks' time we have gone from not a mention of Cyprus to a crisis in Cyprus because none of the official numbers were accurate. Without doubt, without question, if this can happen in Cyprus then it could happen in any other country in the Eurozone because the uncounted liabilities are systemic to the whole of Europe.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Cyprus, It's Not About The Numbers





The Eurogroup agreed on Monday night to allow Cyprus to change the make up of its controversial deposit tax and President Nicos Anastasiades is now proposing that bank customers with deposits under 20,000 euros should not be taxed at all, while keeping the levy the same for the remaining depositors. However, what’s happened over the past few days and what’s likely to happen in the days and weeks to come has little to do with numbers. It is much more about perceptions. Even if capital flight from Cyprus as a result of this decision is less severe than many fear, even if Cypriot banks survive this real stress test, even if the island’s economy is not set back many years, even if savers in Greece, Spain, Portugal and Italy don’t panic, the idea of a deposit tax and the way it was adopted has released something poisonous in the air. It is difficult to see how these citizens will be able to trust the system - be it their governments, banks or eurozone partners - in the weeks to come. Belief in countries where the economy is contracting and unemployment growing is already vitreous and planting fears about a possible deposits grab in the future could shatter it completely.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

A London Cabbie Explains The Great EU Bank Robbery And Much Much More





Still in WallStreetPro withdrawal? We may have just the methadone fix for you... "You will lose your f##king money in your bank," is how this English gentleman cabbie begins his caustic diatribe against all that is wrong with European (and in fact) the world of bankers and elites. The so-called 'artist taxi driver' has a spit-flying hand-smashing epic rant while sitting in his taxi. "They did a stress test on the banks in Cyprus 18 months ago and said it's f##king great" and now this; "this is some f##king crooked shit." "They're off their f##king nuts mate," he explains as he asks rhetorically of the bankers getting the bailouts, "how many f##king ponies do their daughters' need?" Insightfully he remarks that, "Cyprus could be the beginning of a bigger and f##king worse financial crisis," and exclaims "[Goldman Sachs and the Bankers] are looking after their own interest - who are they f##king borrowing money to in Cyprus?" His exasperation is one many can empathize with we are sure as he concludes, "We need to shut down the f##king markets... What kind of society allows the rich people to be gambling while the poor people f##king die," ending with a warning, "Wake the f##k up!"

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: March 15





  • JPMorgan Report Piles Pressure on Dimon in Too-Big Debate (BBG)
  • Employers Blast Fees From New Health Law (WSJ)
  • Obama unveils US energy blueprint (FT)
  • Obama to Push Advanced-Vehicle Research (WSJ) - here come Solar-powered cars?
  • BRICs Abandoned by Locals as Fund Outflows Reach 1996 High (BBG)
  • Obama won't trip over Netanyahu's Iran "red line" (Reuters)
  • Samsung puts firepower behind Galaxy (FT)
  • Boeing sees 787 airborne in weeks with fortified battery (Reuters)
  • Greece Counts on Gas, Gambling to Revive Asset Sales Tied to Aid (BBG)
  • Goldman’s O’Neill Says S&P 500 Beyond 1,600 Needs Growth (BBG)
  • China’s new president in corruption battle (FT)
  • Post-Chavez Venezuela as Chilly for Companies From P&G to Coke (BBG)
 


Tyler Durden's picture

Kyle Bass Warns "The 'AIG' Of The World Is Back"





Kyle Bass, addressing Chicago Booth's Initiative on Global Markets last week, clarified his thesis on Japan in great detail, but it was the Q&A that has roused great concern. "The AIG of the world is back - I have 27 year old kids selling me one-year jump risk on Japan for less than 1bp - $5bn at a time... and it is happening in size." As he explains, the regulatory capital hit for the bank is zero (hence as great a return on capital as one can imagine) and "if the bell tolls at the end of the year, the 27-year-old kid gets a bonus... and if he blows the bank to smithereens, ugh, he got a paycheck all year." Critically, the bank that he bought the 'cheap options' from recently called to ask if he would close the position - "that happened to me before," he warns, "in 2007 right before mortgages cracked." His single best investment idea for the next ten years is, "Sell JPY, Buy Gold, and go to sleep," as he warns of the current situation in markets, "we are right back there! The brevity of financial memory is about two years."

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Same Yen-Funded Melt Up, Different Day





SYFMUDD

The same pattern we have seen every day for the past week is back - slow overnight levitation as bad news piles on more bad news. What bad news? First as noted earlier, a collapse in Chinese imports and a surge in exports, which as SocGen explained is a harbinger of economic weakness in the months to follow, leading to yet another negative close for the Shanghai Composite. Then we got the UK January construction data which plunged by 7.9% according to ONS data. Then the Bank of Italy disclosed that small business lending was down 2.8% in January. We also got a negative Austrian Q4 GDP print.  We also got Spanish industrial output plunging 5% in January (but "much better" than the downward revised -7.1% collapse in December). Capping the morning session was German Industrial Production which not unexpectedly missed expectations of a 0.4% increase, printing at 0.0%, although somewhat better than the horrifying Factory Orders print would have implied. Finally, the ECB announced that a total of EUR4.2 billion in LTRO 1+2 will be repaid in the coming week by 8 and 27 counterparties, about half of the expected, and throwing a monkey wrench in Draghi's narrative that banks are repaying LTRO because they feel much stronger.  Yet none of this matters for two reasons: i) the Japanese Yen is back in its role as a carry funding currency, and was last trading at 95.77, the highest in four years, and with Jen shorts now used to fund USD purchases, the levitation in the stock futures was directly in line with the overnight rout in the Yen; and ii) the buying spree in Spanish bonds, with the 10 Year sliding overnight to just 4.82%, the lowest since 2010.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Surprise! All Banks Pass Stress Test (Except Ally)





In a stunning headline-making moment of clarity, it appears that all the major financials that the Fed monitors (except GMAC Ally) will survive a cataclysmic, Lehman-like moment based on their self-determined analytics of their deeply illiquid off-balance-sheet assets (and a comprehensive understanding of the co-dependence of all those assets). As Bloomberg notes,

*FED SAYS 18 BANKS PROJECTED LOSSES WOULD BE $462B UNDER TEST
*FED SEES 17 BANKS' TIER 1 COMMON RATIO ABOVE 5% IN WORST CASE
*GMAC ALLY ONLY STRESS-TESTED BANK SEEN WITH TIER 1 COMMON BELOW 5%
*TESTS SCENARIO ASSUMES EQUITY PRICES DROP MORE THAN 50%, HOUSING PRICES DECLINE MORE THAN 20%

Is it any wonder that Government Motors wanted to IPO its GMAC/Ally business recently - with a 1.5% stressed Tier 1 ratio.

 


Syndicate content
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!