Switzerland

'Last Economist Standing' John Taylor Urges "Less Weird Policy" At Jackson Hole

Infamous rules-based economist John Taylor attended the first monetary-policy conference in Jackson Hole in 1982, and he may be the only person to attend both the 1st and the this year's 35th. With Fed policy the easiest (relative to economic fundamentals) every in history, Taylor has one wish for an outcome... "less weird policy"

Four More Mega-Banks Join The Anti-Dollar Alliance

Today, four of the world’s largest banks announced a brand new joint venture to create a new financial settlement protocol built on blockchain technology. Deutsche Bank from Germany, UBS from Switzerland, Santander from Spain, and Bank of New York Mellon have joined together to launch what they’re naming the very un-sexy “utility settlement coin”. If foreign banks are able to transact directly with one another without having to go through the US banking system, then why would they need to park trillions of dollars in the United States?

Stocks Creep Higher As Dollar Resumes Falling, Oil Slides For Second Day

While the summer doldrums continue, with little market-moving newsflow overnight and zombified volumes, US futures crept higher and European shares rose after EU PMIs printed modestly better than expected, while a return to dollar weakness pushed emerging markets higher, even if it failed to boost oil which as we noted last night was downgraded by Goldman on various fundamental reasons.

Jim Grant: "This Will Turn Out To Be Very Bad For Many People"

"The stock market is at record highs and the bond market is acting as if this were the Great Depression... the Fed is virtually a hostage of the financial markets. When they sputter, let alone fall, the Fed frets and steps in... the Fed is justified in that belief because it is responsible to a great degree for the elevation of financial asset values... and to me, gold is a very timely way to invest in monetary disorder."

Two More Banks Start Charging Select Clients For Holding Cash

Last weekend, when we reported that Germany's Raiffeisenbank Gmund am Tegernsee - a community bank in southern Germany - said it would start charging retail clients a fee of 0.4% on deposits of more than €100,000 we said that "now that a German banks has finally breached the retail depositor NIRP barrier, expect many more banks to follow." Not even a week later, not one but two large banks have done just that.

Spectacular Chinese Gold Demand Fully Denied By GFMS And Mainstream Media

Gold investors around the world continue to be fooled about Chinese gold demand. For some reason GFMS is restrained in disclosing that any individual or institution in China can directly buy and withdraw gold at the Shanghai Gold Exchange, which is the most significant reason for the discrepancy in question. According to calculations, true Chinese gold demand in 2015 must have been north of 2,250 tonnes.

2 Men, 3 Women, & 6-Year-Old Kid Burned, Stabbed By 27-Year-Old Attacker On Swiss Train

Seven people are in hospital with stab wounds and burns, police say, after an attack on a train near St.Gallen, Switzerland. The man set the train carriage on fire using a flammable liquid and also stabbed passengers, including a six-year-old child, police said. Details are sparse for now but The BBC reports, the suspected attacker, described as a Swiss man aged 27, was also taken to hospital after the incident near Salez in St Gallen Canton

A German Bank Finally Caves: Will Charge Retail Investors A Negative 0.4% Deposit Rate

Raiffeisen Gmund am Tegernsee, a German cooperative savings bank in the Bavarian village of Gmund am Tegernsee, with a population 5,767, finally gave in to the ECB's monetary repression, and announced it’ll start charging retail customers to hold their cash. Starting September, for savings in excess of €100,000 euros, the community’s Raiffeisen bank will charge a 0.4% rate. That represents the first direct pass through of the current level of the ECB’s negative deposit rate on to retail depositors.

Preview Of Key Events In The Coming Week

The coming week brings multiple macro data releases for July, including inflation, trade data, retail sales, IP, credit and money supply. A relatively light US data calendar next week with retail sales the main release on Friday but also import and producer prices and Michigan sentiment coming up. Retail sales will be closely watched to assess consumer spending growth for 3Q.