Toyota

Frontrunning: February 19

  • Stocks knocked back as oil rally falters (Reuters)
  • Still no deal for Britain on EU reforms after all-night talks (Reuters)
  • Oil Falls Near $30 as Rising U.S. Crude Stockpiles Expand Glut (BBG)
  • PBOC to Raise Reserve Ratios for Banks That Don't Meet Criteria (BBG)
  • China’s Top Securities Regulator to Step Down (WSJ)

S&P Futures Storm Above 1900, Europe Jumps Despite Gloomy Asian Session

It has been a morning session of two halves. In Asia, the mood was somber, and stocks fell with the Shanghai Composite (+1.1%) outperforming on another late session binge-fest by the National Team. The European session on the other hand surged higher and did not look back when the USDJPY proceeded to soar 100 pips from overnight lows, and push the Stoxx 600 +1.7% and US equity futures up with it, with the ES trading above 1900 as of this posting, adding to the best 2-day rally in the S&P in five months.

Frontrunning: February 1

  • Stocks cautious after rocky China data, bonds fly high (Reuters)
  • Oil falls on China data, fading prospect of OPEC action (Reuters)
  • Republican Vote in Iowa Caucus Hinges on Newcomer Turnout (WSJ)
  • When Trump tells supporters not to donate, they mostly listen (Reuters)
  • Goldman Sachs Employees Shift to Rubio as Bush Support Fades (BBG)
  • Four Theories on How Oil Has Hypnotized the Global Stock Market (BBG)

Why 'The Regime' Hates Gold

There’s only one investment we can think of that many people either love or hate reflexively, almost without regard to market performance: gold. And, to a lesser degree, silver. It’s strange that these two metals provoke such powerful psychological reactions - especially among people who dislike them. Nobody has an instinctive hatred of iron, copper, aluminum, or cobalt. The reason, of course, is that the main use of gold has always been as money. And people have strong feelings about money. From an economic viewpoint, however, money is just a medium of exchange and a store of value. Efforts to turn it into a political football invariably are signs of a hidden agenda, or perhaps a psychological aberration. So, let’s take some recent statements, assertions, and opinions that have been promulgated in the media and analyze them.

Is ISIS Simply A "Saudi Army In Disguise"?

What stinks in Saudi Arabia ain’t the camel dung. It’s the monarchy of King Salman and his hot-headed son, Prince Salman. For decades they have financed terrorism under a fake religious disguise, to advance their private plutocratic agenda. It has nothing to do with religion and everything to do with money and oil. Saudi control of that oil wealth (from Iraq to Syria) via their ISIS agents, along with her clear plan to take out the US shale oil competition, or so Riyadh reckons, would make the Saudi monarchy a vastly richer state.

Frontrunning: November 5

  • BOE Stays Cautious on Rate-Hike Timing as Inflation Outlook Cut (BBG)
  • China Enters Bull Market (WSJ)
  • Britain says Islamic State likely brought down Russian plane (Reuters)
  • Dollar jumps as markets fix on December rate expectations (Reuters)
  • Activist Investor Bill Ackman Plays Defense (WSJ)
  • BOJ Survey Data Reveals Signs of Growing Inequality in Japan (BBG)
  • UAW Warns of General Motors Strike If Workers Fail to Approve Contract (WSJ)

What The Oil And Gas Industry Is Not Telling Investors

There are very real threats to the business models of oil companies, threats that need to be explained to investors, according to a new report by Carbon Tracker. Right now, those threats are not being taken seriously.

Frontrunning: October 27

  • Hilsenrath - The Fed Strives for a Clear Signal on Interest Rates (WSJ)
  • Tentative Budget Deal Reached, Raising Debt Limit (WSJ)
  • China Calls U.S. Challenge Over Island Threat to Regional Peace (BBG)
  • UK economy slows more than expected in third quarter (Reuters)
  • In China’s Alleyways, Underground Banks Move Money (WSJ)
  • Inside the Secretive Circle That Rules a $14 Trillion Market (BBG)
  • A Frustrated Koch Brother Decides It’s Time to ‘Spout Off’ (WSJ)

Stop Blaming OPEC For Low Prices

OPEC altered the course of the oil markets last year when it decided to cast aside its traditional role of maintaining balance through production cuts. Instead it pursued a strategy of fighting for market share, contributing to an immediate rout in oil prices. WTI and Brent then went on to dive below $50 in the weeks following OPEC’s decision. OPEC is widely expected to continue its current strategy at its next meeting, and as such, no rebound in oil prices is expected, at least not because of the results of the group’s meeting in Vienna. But that raises a question about what the world of oil expects from OPEC: Why is it that the responsibility for balancing the market falls on OPEC? Why should OPEC be the one to fix the imbalances in the global crude oil trade?

Frontrunning: October 26

  • European shares slip as easing expectations fade (Reuters)
  • Valeant and Pharmacy More Intertwined Than Thought (WSJ)
  • The Pawn Isolated: Valeant, Philidor and the Annals of Fraud (WSJ)
  • Strongest Afghan Quake Since 1949 Triggers Search for Survivors (BBG)
  • EU Agrees To Tighten Border Controls And Slow Migrant Arrival (AP)
  • Volkswagen Suspends More Employees (WSJ)
  • Volkswagen Loses Global Sales Lead to Toyota Amid Diesel Scandal (BBG)