Trade Deficit

Yield Curve Collapse & The Fed's "Surprising Economic Strength"

As Lael Brainard piled on The Fed's sudden utter hawkishness, following Dudley, Harker, Kaplan, and Williams, we noticed a common thread behind the need to hike rates in March - each implicitly or explicitly noted America's "surprisingly strong economy." This led to a stunning WTF moment...

President Trump's Address To Congress: Key Highlights And Full Text

"From now on, America will be empowered by our aspirations, not burdened by our fears –- inspired by the future, not bound by the failures of the past –- and guided by our vision, not blinded by our doubts. I am asking all citizens to embrace this Renewal of the American Spirit. I am asking all members of Congress to join me in dreaming big, and bold and daring things for our country."

Q1 GDP At Risk As Trade Deficit Balloons Near 9 Year Highs

On the heels of a disappointing revised Q4 GDP print, the US trade balance for January printed a $69.2 billion deficit. This is the second largest deficit since August 2008 (slightly smaller than the March 2015 plunge) as the dollar surge has not helped.

With All Eyes On Trump Tonight, US Futures, Global Stocks Hug The Flatline

With traders focused on President Trump's address to Congress tonight where he is expected to outline his economic priorities and provide plan details, European stocks are little changed for a second day and Asian stocks decline modestly as U.S. futures trade around the flatline. Oil declines, while the dollar is little changed.

Key Events In The Coming US

The main focus this week will be on President Trump's speech to Congress and Chair Yellen's speech which is the last before the blackout period. US durable goods, ISM, the BoC rate decision, EZ CPI, UK PMIs and a busy calendar in Australia & Scandinavia also coming up.

White House May Change Calculation Of US Trade Deficit, Boosting Trade War Odds

The Trump administration is considering changing the way the U.S. trade deficit is calculated, a shift that would make America's trade gap appear even greater than it has been in recent years, potentially making future trade skirmishes and wars with America's export-heavy trade partners far more likely. 

Carbon Taxes, Cow Farts, And Central Planning

In a centrally planned economy decisions on what to produce, how to produce, and for whom are taken primarily by the government. But not even Stalin or Roosevelt could come up with a rather exotic tool that can take central planning to a whole new level: carbon taxes.