Trade Deficit

ilene's picture

Sorry Protesters: Your Jobs Are Being Sent To China And They Aren't Coming Back





There is a one way conveyor belt taking businesses, jobs and money out of this country. 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Goldman Q4 GDP Forecast At 1.0% Following Trade Data





So just what is below "stall-speed" growth in the New Normal? And with 48 out of 49 economists now predicting what we said would happen back in September, namely that the Fed will go all in with QEternity+1 and take its balance sheet to $4 trillion (and then $5 trillion in 2014) yet firmly holding their 2013 year end GDP forecast at 2.0%, lower than Q3 2011's 2.7%, does it mean that even $1 trillion in additional flow and stock from the Fed can barely keep the economy above the Old Normal stall speed definition? What exactly would happen if the Fed were to not monetize hundreds of billions in debt? We shiver to even think.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Chart Of The Day: US-China Trade Deficit Hits Record





The US Census Bureau reported that in October, the total deficit with China hit a record $29.5 billion. What did America need to export so much that it is willing to impair its GDP (net imports are a GDP drain) and boost the GDP of China? "Primarily computers and toys, games, and sporting goods." In other words, gizmos and iPhones. And no, China did not buy US bonds - recall that China has boycotted US Treasurys for precisely one year - so the age old equality that we export China worthless paper in exchange for just as worthless gizmos, yet somehow everyone benefits, is no longer valid. What the US does, however, export to China, is inflation, courtesy of the USDCNY peg, and is the reason why the PBOC is still terrified, and certainly will be after Bernanke announces QE4EVA (RIP QEternity) tomorrow, to ease more as the last thing it can afford is to create its own inflation in addition to importing America's.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

October US Exports Plunge By Most Since January 2009 As Trade Deficit With China Hits Record





The boost to GDP from the declining US trade deficit is over. While the September trade deficit number was revised further lower, to $40.3 billion from $41.5 previously, October saw a pick up to $42.2 billion, slightly less than the expected $42.7 billion, but a headwind to Q4 GDP already. As a result, expect a modest boost to Q3 GDP in its final revision, even as Q4 GDP continues to contract below its consensus of sub stall-speed ~1%. The reason for the decline: a 3.6% decline in exports of goods and services. This was the biggest percent drop in exports since January 2009 as the traditional US import partners are all wrapped in a major recession. What helped, however, was the offsetting drop in imports by 2.1%, the lowest since April 2011, as US businesses are likewise consumed by a concerns about the global economy. And without global trade, whose nexus just happens to be Europe, there can be no global or even regional recovery. So far, all hopes of a pick up in global economy have been largely dashed. Yet one country benefits from the ongoing US slump is China: imports from China - consisting primarily of computers and toys, games, and sporting goods- jumped 6.4% to a record $40.3 billion, offset be a modest rise in exports - primarily soybeans - to $10.8 billion, bring the China deficit to a record $29.5 billion from $29.1 billion in September. Of course, one wouldn't get that impression looking at the Chinese side of the ledger: the Chinese Customs department, reported a September and October trade surplus with the US amounting to $21.1 and $21.7 billion. One wonders, somewhat, where the over $16 billion difference has gone.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Overnight Sentiment: ZEW Rises, Greek Buyback Scheduled To End





In a session that has been largely quiet there was one notable macro update, and this was the German ZEW Economic Sentiment survey, which after months in negative territory, surprised to the upside in December, printing at 6.9, on expectations of a -11.5 number, and up from -15.7. This was the first positive print since May, and in stark contrast with the dramatic cut of German GDP prospects by the Bundesbank from last Friday, which saw 2013 GDP slashed by 75% from 1.6 to 0.4%. In fact, moments after the ZEW report, which is mostly driven by market-sentiment, in which regard a soaring DAX has been quite helpful, the German RWI Institute cut German 2012 and 2013 GDP forecasts from 0.8% to 0.7% and from 1% to 0.3%. In other words, any "confidence" will have to keep coming on the back of the market, and not the economy, which is set to slow down even further in the coming year. But for a market which will goalseek any and all data to suit the narrative (recall the huge miss in US Michigan consumer confidence which lead to a market rise), this datapoint will undoubtedly serve as merely another reinforecement that all is well, when nothing could be further from reality. Also, since we live in interesting "Baffle with BS" times, expect the far more important IFO index to diverge once again with its leading ZEW indicator (as it did in November) - after all everyone must be constantly confused and live headline to positive headline.

 
testosteronepit's picture

The Socialist Heart Of France Spits Out Its First Victim





Nationalizations and protectionism have run into a buzz saw.

 
Marc To Market's picture

Currency Positioning and Technical Outlook: Stirred by not Shaken





 

We have been tracking the deterioration of the US dollar's technical tone over the past three weeks.  That ended abruptly.  Weak euro area data, a more dovish than expected ECB, and heightened political uncertainty in Italy, saw the euro reverse lower after briefly moving above an eighteen month-old downtrend.   

 

The UK also cut its growth outlook, and poor data increases the likelihood that the BOE  may have to resume its gilt purchases in the new year, though consumer inflation expectations have ticked up recently.  

 

At the same time, there appears to be little progress on the US fiscal talks.  Whenever a top official signals this, the dollar seems to tick up on risk-off considerations, though with diminishing impact.  The stronger than expected November employment data is not sufficient to stay the Fed's hand and the FOMC will most likely expand the long-term assets purchased under QE3+ at its meeting that concludes on December 12.

 

 
Marc To Market's picture

Dollar Stays Bid: Take Five





The US dollar extended yesterday's gains and remain bid ahead of the November jobs report.   The deterioration of the economic and political situation in the euro area appears to be the single biggest factor behind the greenback's sharp recovery.   The dollar is little changed against the yen as the market grapples with the implication of the earthquake and tsunami.  

 

Asian equity markets were mostly higher with the MSCI Asia-Pacific Index was up about 0.25% and,. of note, the Shanghai Composite extended this week's recovery, gaining 1.6% to bring the weekly advance to 4.1%.  European bourses are bit heavier.    Spanish and Italian bonds remain under pressures, while Greek bond yields continue to fall as a the bond buy back offer expires today and the market anticipates a successful conclusion.  

 

We share five observations today. 

 
Marc To Market's picture

FX Churns, Waiting for Fresh Incentives





A consolidative tone threatening to emerging in the foreign exchange market, as prices churn awaiting not only today's press conference following the ECB meeting, but also tomorrow's US employment data and prospects for an expansion of QE3+ at next week's FOMC meeting. 

 

Five major central banks were to meet this week, with only the Reserve Bank of Australia poised to act.  They did cut rates, but the accompanying statement did not tip the hand of the next move.  The market took advantage of the jobs data's favorable optics to reduce the likelihood of a follow up cut in February to about 50/50.  

 

The details of the employment report were really weaker than it appeared.  The 13.9k increase in jobs is misleading as it was driven exclusively by part-time jobs.  Full time work actually fell 4.2k, the first decline in four months.  The unexpected decline in the unemployment rate to 5.2% from 5.4% in Sept and Oct was a function of a decline in the participation rate.  The Australian dollar has traded now (barely) on both sides of yesterday's range.  Offers in the $1.05 area continue to slow the Aussie's ascent.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Goodbye Petrodollar, Hello Agri-Dollar?





When it comes to firmly established, currency-for-commodity, self reinforcing systems in the past century of human history, nothing comes close to the petrodollar: it is safe to say that few things have shaped the face of the modern world and defined the reserve currency as much as the $2.3 trillion/year energy exports denominated exclusively in US dollars (although recent confirmations of previously inconceivable exclusions such as Turkey's oil-for-gold trade with Iran are increasingly putting the petrodollar status quo under the microscope). But that is the past, and with rapid changes in modern technology and extraction efficiency, leading to such offshoots are renewable and shale, the days of the petrodollar "as defined" may be over. So what new trade regime may be the dominant one for the next several decades? According to some, for now mostly overheard whispering in the hallways, the primary commodity imbalance that will shape the face of global trade in the coming years is not that of energy, but that of food, driven by constantly rising food prices due to a fragmented supply-side unable to catch up with increasing demand, one in which China will play a dominant role but not due to its commodity extraction and/or processing supremacy, but the contrary: due to its soaring deficit for agricultural products, and in which such legacy trade deficit culprits as the US will suddenly enjoy a huge advantage in both trade and geopolitical terms. Coming soon: the agri-dollar.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: The Unadulterated Gold Standard Part 2





In Part I, we looked at the period prior to and during the time of what we now call the Classical Gold Standard.  It should be underscored that it worked pretty darned well.  Under this standard, the United States produced more wealth at a faster pace than any other country before, or since. In Part II we focus on the Post-1913 (Fed to Nixon) era and the fact that - for many reasons, politicians felt that a quasi-government agency could make better credit decisions than the market. This regime was unstable, as economists such as Jacques Rueff and Robert Triffin realized. Since then, it has become obvious that without the anchor of gold, the monetary system is un-tethered, unbounded, and unhinged.  Capital is being destroyed at an exponentially accelerating rate, and this can be seen by exponentially rising debt that can never be repaid, a falling interest rate, and numerous other phenomena.

 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Understanding the "Exorbitant Privilege" of the U.S. Dollar





The dollar rises for the same reason gold and grain rise: scarcity and demand. Which is easier to export: manufactured goods that require shipping ore and oil halfway around the world, smelting the ore into steel and turning the oil into plastics, laboriously fabricating real products and then shipping the finished manufactured goods to the U.S. where fierce pricing competition strips away much of the premium/profit? Or electronically printing money and exchanging it for real products, steel, oil, etc.? I think we can safely say that creating money out of thin air and "exporting" that is much easier than actually mining, extracting or manufacturing real goods. This astonishing exchange of conjured money for real goods is the heart of the "exorbitant privilege" that accrues to the issuer of the global reserve currency (U.S. dollar). To understand the reserve currency, we must understand Triffin's Paradox.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Daily US Opening News And Market Re-Cap: November 12





Another day another sell-off…with equity markets in Europe trending steadily lower after it was reported that the decision on Greek aid will not be taken during the Eurogroup meeting scheduled for November 12. Still, EU official said that there will be no Greek default on November 16th (EUR 4.1bln redemptions) and that this redemption is to be "factored in" decision on disbursement. Separately,  analysts at Fitch rating agency noted that while current Spain’s rating is appropriate, further action would more likely than not be to sub-investment grade. Moody’s also commented on the never-ending sovereign debt crisis today, stating that actions taken by the ECB only buying time for Euro region and that a decision on France will be communicated within a few weeks. As a result, bond and credit spreads widen further today, with SP/GE 10s spread at 450 level, which is of particular importance given that this is the level at which the LCH begins to review bonds for margin requirements. Deterioration in Italian paper was linked to next week’s supply. In turn, EUR/USD and GBP/USD trended lower, with the USD index up 0.12% at last check. Going forward, market participants will get to digest the release of the latest U. Michigan Survey (Nov P), as well as macro forecasts from Philadelphia Fed.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Trade Deficit - Increase In Exports To Be Short Lived





The U.S. trade balance in September improved, largely on petroleum, with a rebound in exports.  This was good news for a single economic data point and it sent mainstream economists to mistakenly begin boosting third quarter GDP estimates to 2.9% from the 1st estimate of 2.0% that we saw last month. The important point is that the trend of exports, and imports, has been negative as the recession in Europe, and slowdown in China, have reduced end demand. There are a numer of reasons that the recent positive boosts to the trade deficit data are more likely temporary in nature and will be revised away in the months ahead.  "Regardless of when the NBER officially announces the start date of the next recession - the damage will have already been done to investors."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Daily US Opening News And Market Re-Cap: November 9





Another day another sell-off…with equity markets in Europe trending steadily lower after it was reported that the decision on Greek aid will not be taken during the Eurogroup meeting scheduled for November 12. Still, EU official said that there will be no Greek default on November 16th (EUR 4.1bln redemptions) and that this redemption is to be "factored in" decision on disbursement. Separately, analysts at Fitch rating agency noted that while current Spain’s rating is appropriate, further action would more likely than not be to sub-investment grade. Moody’s also commented on the never-ending sovereign debt crisis today, stating that actions taken by the ECB only buying time for Euro region and that a decision on France will be communicated within a few weeks. As a result, bond and credit spreads widen further today, with SP/GE 10s spread at 450 level, which is of particular importance given that this is the level at which the LCH begins to review bonds for margin requirements. Deterioration in Italian paper was linked to next week’s supply. In turn, EUR/USD and GBP/USD trended lower, with the USD index up 0.12% at last check. Going forward, market participants will get to digest the release of the latest U. Michigan Survey (Nov P), as well as macro forecasts from Philadelphia Fed.

 
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