Unemployment

Tyler Durden's picture

Mario Draghi's Slippery Downward Slope





There has to be a very clear line between central banks and governments. The latter should never be able to influence the former, because it would risk making economic policy serve only short term interests (until the next election). Likewise the former should stay out of the latter’s decisions, because that would tend to make political processes skewed disproportionally towards finance and the economy, at the potential cost of other interests in a society. This may sound idealistic and out of sync with the present day reality, but if it does, that does not bode well. It’s dangerous to play fast and loose with the founding principles of individual countries, and perhaps even more with those of unions of sovereign nations.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Greek "Anti-Austerity" Wave Spreads In Dramatic Loss For Spanish Status Quo





With just 10 days until a June 5 IMF payment that Athens almost certainly will not make unless it strikes a deal for the disbursement of more bailout funds, things just got quite a bit more interesting on the EU political front after Spain’s Popular Party was dealt a dramatic electoral blow on Sunday by the leftist Podemos and center-right Ciudadanos.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

We Have Entered The Mania Phase: Market Complacency Has Never Been Higher





More than merely a subjective, psychological state, the complacency of market participants can be effectively quantified, which is precisely what Deutsche Bank's David Bianco has done by looking at the ratio of the market's P/E to implied vol or VIX. As the chart below shows, on a daily basis the PE/VIX ratio just hit 1.49x - it has never been higher, and again based on DB's estimation, market sentiment has now crossed from the complacency zone into outright Mania. The last time this ratio was at the current level: late 2007/early 2008, just before the Fed had to launch a multi-trillion bailout to save capitalism as we know it.

 
Phoenix Capital Research's picture

The Single Largest Misallocation of Capital in History





The global Central Banks, driven by their Keynesian lunacy, have induced the single largest misallocation of capital in history.

 
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Steen Jakobsen Warns, Brace For The Next Recession





The financial world today is now an island on its own – separated from the real economy, as can be seen by the paradox of record high valuation in the stock market coinciding with record low inflation, employment , productivity and no hope. There is asset inflation, but deflation in the real economy. When the world has been this long at the zero-bound, the misallocation, the inability to reform, and a toolbox without new tools creates a mandate for change. "I expect stocks to trade sideways for the balance of 2015 and have now sold all my fixed income, increased my gold exposure, and I’m looking to buy mining companies and overall to increase my exposure to commodities beyond the normal allocation."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

For Today's Investors: Ignorance Is Not Bliss - It Is Oblivion





“Ignorance is not bliss – it is oblivion. Determined ignorance is the hastiest kind of oblivion.” As investors, we have all been warned. Not by the future, but by the past.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Our Crazy-Making Economy's Endgame: Festering Frustration Seeking An Outlet





The consequence of policies that exacerbate injustice, inequality and double-bind demands is a madness that will find a social and economic outlet somewhere, sometime.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Chinese Stock Bubble Frenzy Returns; US Futures Flat Ahead Of Today's Pre-Holiday Zero Volume Melt Up





The highlight of the overnight newsflow may have been the BOJ's preannounced statement that it is keeping its QE unchanged (which comes as no surprise after a few weeks ago the BOJ adimitted it would be unable to keep inflation "stable" at the 2% in the required timeframe), but the highlight of overnight markets was certainly China, where the Banzai Buyers have reemerged, leading to another whopping +2.8% session for the Shanghai Composite which has now risen to a fresh 7 years high.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Fallacy Of Unequivocal Faith In The Fed's Babbling Bubble-Blowers





To preserve any idea that the US is not heading into recession, the FOMC is now wholly reliant on statistical processes within the BEA’s use of the Census Bureau’s updated ARIMA-X13 modeling system. It is amazing to see this policy body that once proclaimed, unequivocally and forcefully, that it could perform the monetary equivalent of sorcery and alchemy reduced to quivering about winter. The latest policy statement, a silly farce of its own accord, is, quite simply, an embarrassment.

 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Former Fed Governor Says Fed Lost Credibility To "Stay On Top Of Ticking Monetary Bomb"





"The Fed has dragged out the normalization of interest rates way beyond what is prudent... At some point... the market is going to say ‘on my god, we’re so far behind the curve’ and force an adjustment that is going to be wrenching... when this “wrenching” adjustment kicks in, it would turn into a market disruption at a level “seven or eight” on a scale of 10, with 10 being the worst."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Fed's Computer Model Of The US Economy "Sees Little Slack" (And A Big Clue From Gartman)





Even without a double seasonal adjustment, the Fed may very well surprise with not only a September, but even a June hike. After all recall that to Yellen stocks are now clearly overvalued, and the cornered Fed Chairwoman is between a rock and a hard place - keep failing to rase rates and risk another bond tantrum as all the shorts are squeezed leading to even more illiquidity and volatility, or slowly take the air out of the stock bubble (good luck with that).

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Despite Weak Economic Data Overnight, Futures Slide On Rate Hike Concerns





The big news overnight was neither the Chinese manufacturing PMI miss nor the just as unpleasant (and important) German manufacturing and service PMI misses, but that speculation about a rate hike continues to grow louder despite the abysmal economic data lately, with the latest vote of support of a 25 bps rate increase coming from Goldman which overnight updated its "Fed staff model" and found surprisingly little slack in the economy suggesting that the recent push to blame reality for not complying with economist models (and hence the need for double seasonal adjustments) is gaining steam, and as we first suggested earlier this week, it may just happen that the Fed completely ignores recent data, and pushes on to tighten conditions, if only to rerun the great Trichet experiment of the summer of 2011 when the smallest of rate hikes resulted in a double dip recession.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Fed Has Created A "Clockwork Orange" Market





Stanley Kubrick's highly-disturbing film-version of A Clockwork Orange takes place in a dystopian futuristic London and exposes the extreme battle of good versus evil. Extracting out the violence, we can’t help but notice the symbolic similarities of the motif-ridden story with the 2008 financial market fallout and subsequent attempts at economic rehabilitation. The film forces us to consider how much liberty we are willing to give up for order, and how much order we are willing to give up for liberty.  The central idea of the film has to do with the freedom of the individual to make free choices, but free choice becomes problematic when it undermines the safety and stability of society. It reminds us of the markets price discovery mechanisms (or lack thereof).

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Hilsenrath Confirms Hawkish Fed Sees Q1 Weakness As A Blip, June Liftoff Possible





Federal Reserve officials meeting in late April doubted they would be ready to raise short-term interest rates by midyear, according to WSJ's Jon Hilsenrath's translation of the minutes of the meeting released Wednesday. They generally did not rule out the possibility of a June rate hike, Fed officials are trying to make sense of a first-quarter economic slowdown.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Global Demand Dearth Costs $1.2 Trillion In Lost Wages, $3.7 Trillion In GDP





A new report from The International Labor Organization has quantified the economic impact of subpar global demand and it is astonishing... 

 
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