Unemployment

Tyler Durden's picture

Obama Revises CBO Deficit Forecast, Predicts 110% Debt-To-GDP By End Of 2013, Worse Deficit In 2012 Than 2011





While we have excoriated the unemployable, C-grade, goalseeking, manipulative excel hacks at the CBO on more than one occasion by now (see here, here and here), it appears this time it is the administration itself which has shown that when it comes to predicting the future, only "pledging" Greece is potentially worse than the CBO. WSJ reports that "President Barack Obama's budget request to Congress on Monday will forecast a deficit of $1.33 trillion in fiscal year 2012 and will include hundreds of billions of dollars of proposed infrastructure spending, according to draft documents viewed by Dow Jones Newswires and The Wall Street Journal. The projected deficit is higher than the $1.296 trillion deficit in 2011 and also slightly higher than a roughly $1.15 trillion projection released by the Congressional Budget Office last week. The budget, according to the documents, will forecast a $901 billion deficit for fiscal 2013, which would be equivalent to 5.5% of gross domestic product. That is up from the administration's September forecast of a deficit of $833 billion, or 5.1% of GDP." Where does the CBO see the 2013 budget (deficit of course): -$585 billion, or a 35% delta from the impartial CBO! In other words between 2012 and 2013 the difference between the CBO and Obama's own numbers will be a total of $542 billion. That's $542 billion more debt than the CBO, Treasury and TBAC predict will be needed. In other words while we already know that the total debt by the end of 2012 will be about $16.4 trillion (and likely more, we just use the next debt target, pardon debt ceiling as a referenece point), this means that by the end of 2013, total US debt will be at least $17.4 trillion. Assuming that US 2011 GDP of $15.1 trillion grows by the consensus forecast 2% in 2012 and 3% in 2013, it means that by the end of next year GDP will be $15.8 trillion, or a debt-to-GDP ratio of 110%. Half way from where we are now, to where Italy was yesterday. And of course, both the real final deficit and Debt to GDP will be far, far worse, but that's irrelevant.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The New Youth Normal - Your Parents' Basement





Recent times have been particularly hard on young adults. As we look around the world at Europe and the Middle-East, it is all too often the youth that are leading the social unrest as they again and again are the hardest hit by the global deleveraging (and admittedly most socially connected). The US is not insulated from this (though perhaps more Xanax-subdued) as youth unemployment is around 20% (with 16-19 year-olds around 25%). As Pew Research Center notes though, that fully 55% of those aged 18-24 (and 4% of 25-34 year olds) say young adults are having the toughest time in today's economy. The day-to-day realities of economic hard times are somewhat shocking for a country supposedly so far up the developed spectrum as roughly a quarter of adults aged 18 to 34 (24%) say that, due to economic conditions, they have moved back in with their parents in recent years after living on their own. In the 25 to 29 age range a shocking 34% have moved back home with mom and pop (hardly likely to help with the huge shadow housing inventory overhang we discussed yesterday) Finding a job, saving for the future, paying for college, and buying a home are seen as dramatically harder for today's young adults compared to their parent's generation while Facebook saves the day as staying in touch with friends/family is the only stand out aspect of life that is 'easier' for today's youth. As these increasingly disenfranchised young adults make some of life's biggest transitions (or not as the case seems to be), we wonder just how long it will be before Al-Jazeera is reporting on the Yankee-Spring and showing video of young hoody-wearing Americans throwing their 'Vans' at 80 inch plasma TVs; or maybe the BLS will decide to redefine basement-dwelling (or rioting) as a full-time job.

 
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Is It The Weather, Stupid? David Rosenberg On What "April In January" Means For Seasonal Adjustments





Remember last year when the tiniest snowfall was reason for everyone and their grandmother to miss every possible estimate, always blaming it on the weather? Or rainfall in the spring? Or warm weather during the summer? Oddly enough one never hears about the opposite: the beneficial, and one-time, impact to trendline due to countertrend weather, such as the fact that we just had April weather in January. Granted, nobody in the programmed MSM will touch this topic, which is why we go to the most trustworthy filter of real economic data - David Rosenberg. "...Be careful in assessing the seasonally adjusted data when January weather feels like April. It was four to five degrees warmer than usual and the third fewest snowflakes to hit the ground in the past 50 years. On top of that, let's not lose sight of what real GDP did in Q4 — considerably below consensus view from last summer and sub-1% at an annual rate once inventories are stripped out. The only variable preventing real GDP from stagnating completely was the fact the price deflator collapsed to just 0.4% at an annual rate. If it had averaged to what it was in the previous three quarters, real GDP growth would have come in close to a 0.7% annual rate. Strip out the inventory build-up and real sales would have contracted at a 1.3% annual rate and recession would be dripping off everybody's tongue right now."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

A Very Different Take On The "Iran Barters Gold For Food" Story





Much has been made of today's Reuters story how "Iran turns to barter for food as sanctions cripple imports" in which we learn that "Iran is turning to barter - offering gold bullion in overseas vaults or tankerloads of oil - in return for food", and whose purpose no doubt is to demonstrate just how crippled the Iranian economy is as a result of the ongoing US embargo. Incidentally this story is 100% the opposite of the Debka-spun groundless disinformation from a few weeks ago that India was preparing to pay for Iran's oil in gold (they got the asset right, but the flow of funds direction hopelessly wrong). While there is certainly truth to the fact that the US is actively seeking to destabilize the local government, we wonder why? After all as the opportunity cost for the existing regime to do something drastic gets ever lower as the popular resentment rises, leaving the local administration with few options but to engage either the US or Israel. Unless of course, this is the ultimate goal. Yet going back to the Reuters story, it would be quite dramatic, if only it was not the case that Iran has been laying the groundwork for a barter economy for many months now, something which various other analysts perceive as the basis for the destruction of the petrodollar system. Perhaps regular readers will recall that back in July, we wrote an article titled "China And Iran To Bypass Dollar, Plan Oil Barter System." Specifically, we wrote that "according to the FT, China has decided to commence a barter system in which Iranian oil is exchanged directly for Chinese exports. The net result: not only a slap for the US Dollar, but implicitly for all fiat intermediaries, as Iran and China are about to prove that when it comes to exchanging hard resources for critical Chinese goods and services, the world's so called reserve currency is completely irrelevant." Seen in this light the fact that Iran is actually proceeding with a barter system, something that had been in the works for quite a while, actually puts the Reuters story in a totally different light: instead of one predicting the imminent demise of the Iranian economy, the conclusion is inverted, and underscores the culmination of what may have been an extended barter preparation period, has finally gone from beta to (pardon the pun) gold, and Iran is now successfully engaging in global trade without the use of the historical reserve currency.

 
George Washington's picture

Government Uses Anti-Terror Laws to Crush Dissent and Help the Too Big to Fail Businesses





When the Powers-That-Be Can Label All Americans Terrorists, They Can Arbitrarily Harass Anyone They Dislike
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Holidays In The Greek Sun





Somehow the anger of the sex pistols, the sound of boots marching in the background, seem right to me today. Greek Industrial Production dropped 11.3% in December. The unemployment rate jumped to 20.9%, up from 18.2%. The charade of negotiations and a bailout can go. Some deal is likely to be announced. I’m not even sure it will be relevant by the March 20th bond maturity deadline. The economy is getting worse, fast. People are getting angry, fast. The “force feeding of austerity” and plan after plan that is really just a focus on banks at the expense of the people is getting old. While we wait for whatever plan is about to be announced, to some fanfare and some small pop in stock futures, the markets are mixed.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: February 9





  • New Greek demands threaten debt deal (FT)
  • Greek Finance Minister Heads to Brussels; Loan Talks Stall (WSJ)
  • Talks Stalled on Greek Bailout as Venizelos Heads to Brussels (Bloomberg)
  • US banks near historic deal on foreclosures (FT)
  • Obama: Europe needs "absolute commitment" on debt crisis (Reuters)
  • Fed's Lacker sees no need for more easing for now (Reuters)
  • Europe compromise urged at summit (China Daily)
  • China to Punish Illicit Bank Lending, Shanghai Securities Says (Bloomberg)
  • Monti Meets Obama Amid ’Spectacular Progress’ (Bloomberg)
  • Draghi’s First 100 Days Presage Greek Help (Bloomberg)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Daily US Opening News And Market Re-Cap: February 8





European stocks advanced today following reports that the ECB is said to be willing to exchange Greek bonds with EFSF. In addition to that, although a vast majority of officials remain adamant that no haircuts will be applied, WSJ report indicated that the concession by the ECB will contribute to the Greek debt reduction, and the concession depends on the overall debt agreement being set. However it remains to be seen what effect using the EFSF for such spurious purposes will have on the demand for EFSF issued bonds in the future. Still, the renewed sense of optimism that debt swap talks are nearing an end depressed investor appetite for fixed income securities, which in turn resulted in further tightening of peripheral bond yield spreads. The stand out was the 10-year Spanish bond, amid a syndicated issuance from the Treasury. Going forward, Greek PM is scheduled to meet party leaders on a loan deal at 1300GMT, while other reports have suggested that the Troika is keen on meeting Greek parties individually. There is little in terms of macro-economic data releases today, however the US Treasury is due to sell USD 24bln in 10y notes.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: February 8





  • Greek Premier to Seek Bailout Consensus Amid Political Quarrels (Bloomberg)
  • Merkel makes case for painful reform (FT)
  • Bernanke Cites Risks to Progress of Recovery (WSJ)
  • Proposed settlement with banks over foreclosure practices dealt a setback (WaPo)
  • Merkel Approval in Germany Climbs to Highest Level Since 2009 Re-Election (Bloomberg)
  • Francois Hollande will spark next euro crisis (MarketWatch)
  • China’s Central Bank Pledges Support for Housing Market (Bloomberg)
  • Italy Pushes for Europe Growth Policy (Bloomberg)
  • Santorum bounces back in Republican race (FT)
  • China 'Big Four' Banks Issued CNY320 Billion New Yuan Loans In Jan (WSJ)
  • Gasoline and diesel prices raised (China Daily)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: The Fed Resumes Printing





The problem with printing money and promising to do so for years ahead of time is that the negative consequences of inflation only happen after a delay. As a result, it's difficult to know if a policy has gone too far until years down the road at times. Unfortunately, if confidence in the dollar is lost, the consequences cannot be easily reversed. One problem for the Fed itself is that it holds long-term securities that will lose value if rates rise. The federal government faces an even more serious problem when interest rates rise, as higher rates on its debt mean greater interest payments to service. Due to this federal-government debt burden, the Fed has an incentive to keep rates low, even if the long-term result is higher inflation. However, for now the Fed's statement suggests it sees inflation as "subdued," so it's putting those concerns aside for now.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

In The Meantime, Greece Is Under Strike Lockdown Protesting Austerity





Not like it will make much of a difference, since whether striking or not, nobody actually pays taxes, but the symbolism of all of Greece being on strike lock down to protest austerity in a day when the latest Troika austerity ushering deal is due in "hours" is not lost on us. Here is Kathimerini (local translated edition) summarizing today's festivities: "According to data from the GSEE, participation in refineries, shipyards, and transport ships, reached 100%, banks, PPC, OTE and EYDAP, 80%, ports and construction 70% while 60% moved to participate in metal workers. About 15,000 workers and members of leftist organizations took part in the strike gathering held at 11 am in Syntagma Square. Despite the constant rain, the protesters staged a symbolic encirclement of Parliament until late afternoon." "One in two people and one in three women are unemployed, 12% of our citizens living with zero income and 50% below the poverty line," he stressed in his speech to the concentration of SHIFT and given the President of the SHIFT Panagiotis Tsarampoulidis , expressing the opposition of the unions' betrayal of the public property, "layoffs, cutting salaries and pensions and" policies that lead to poverty and misery." More details below.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Fed's Record Setting Money Supply Splurge Spurs Gold's Rally





The surge in the U.S. money supply in recent years has sent gold into a series of new record nominal highs.  Money supply surged again in 2011 sending gold to new record nominal highs. Money supply has grown again, by more than 35% on an annualized basis, and this is contributing to gold’s consolidation and strong gains in January.  The Federal Reserve's latest weekly money supply report from last Thursday shows seasonally adjusted M1 rose $13.2 billion to $2.233 trillion, while M2 rose $4.5 billion to $9.768 trillion.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

A "Quality Assessment" Of US Jobs Reveals The Ugliest Picture Yet





Over the past week we have repeatedly exposed the BLS' shennanigans to both keep the headline unemployment rate suppressed and to generate an upward bias in the market courtesy of a "bigger than expected beat" of expectations. Granted, various semantics experts continue to scratch their heads in attempting to explain a collapsing labor force when even Goldman's Sven Jari Stehn just predicted that it will drop to 63.1% by the end of 2012 (and 62.5% by the end of 2015). Funny then that the US will have no unemployment left when the participation rate drops to 58.5%. And no, the "population soared argument based on revised data" doesn't quite cut it when the bulk of said surge not only did not get a job, but was not even counted toward the labor force. Yet what the biggest flaw with all these arguments that vainly (and veinly) attempt to defend the US economy as if it is growing, is that they focus exclusively on the quantity of jobs, doctored or not, and completely ignore the quality. We have decided to step in and fill this void.

 
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