Unemployment

Tim Knight from Slope of Hope's picture

Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt





I just finished Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt by Chris Hedges and Joe Sacco. It is superb, and I've spent a fair amount of time typing in passages from the book below in order to capture some of its theme.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Here's Hilsenrath: The Door Is Still Open For The Fed To "Help The Economy"





One didn't think that an economic event could come and go without some commentary from the WSJ's resident "Fed mouthpiece-cum-economist" who has rapidly become a caricature of himself, and is solely known for his heretofore programmed leaks of Fed policy, which tended to work until it didn't. In a normal day when newsflow or fundamentals actually mattered, we would focus on far more important things. However, since we are caught in the manic phase of the market's daily bipolar gyrations, and nothing can make a dent in sentiment at least until Monday when the market suddenly decides it was 100% wrong in its re-interpretation of Draghi's comments (last we checked there is still no press release from the Bundesbank saying it has agreed to any bond buying, let along short-dated) and decides to plunge all over again, here is Jon with more propaganda that today's NFP beat, which is still well below the 200+ needed to maintain the declining unemployment rate trendline, means nothing for the Fed.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Baffle With BS Continues: Non-Manufacturing ISM Better Than Expected As Employment Drops To Lowest Since 2011





The strategy to keep everyone utterly confused and merely chasing momentum and trends continues. After the surge in this morning's NFP report, driven entirely by statistical fudging and part-time jobs, which has sent the market higher by well over 1%, we next get a Services ISM update for July according to which the US non-manufcaturing sector improved modestly, to 52.6, on expectations of an unchanged print at 52.1, making the case for NEW QE even more distant. But wait, just to keep everyone totally baffled with BS, the ISM says that the employment index dipped below 50 for the first time since 2011, printing at 49.3 from 52.3: in other words, the employment in the US services sector is now contracting, something which the NFP number roundly denied. Confusion? Mutual exclusivity? It doesn't matter to algos, who are confident that the Fed will certainly launch more QE with the S&P at 2012 highs no matter what the facts say.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

July Non Farm Payrolls Slam Expectations At 163,000K, Unemployment Rate 8.Rises To 3%





Expectations were +100,000, NFP prints at 163,000K. Goodbye QE in 2012.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Today's "Max Pain" - A Stronger Than Expected Non Farm Payrolls Report





While normally quite absurd, we do have to admit that last month, Deutsche Bank's Joe LaVorgna was among the analysts closest to the final actual number, which came in far below consensus. As such we give him the benefit of the first forecast: Joe LaVorgna is expecting a headline/private payroll increase of 75k/80k respectively. The market is looking for 100k/110k. Unemployment is expected to hold at 8.2%. The irony today is that max pain is a far stronger number, which in light of some very recent economic news, can not be ruled out (see Nick Colas' discussion below): if indeed NFP rises by well over 100,000 the market will have to push back its prayer that the NEW QE will come in September into 2013 as Bernanke will not do another easing round just as the presidential election approaches. What are some others thinking? Here is what Bank of America says.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: August 3





  • U.S. nuclear bomb facility shut after security breach (Reuters)
  • EU Commission Welcomes Greek Reform Pledge, Wants Implementation (Reuters) -> less talkee, more tickee
  • China Cuts Stock Trading Costs to Lift Confidence (China Daily) as France hikes transactions costs
  • Holding Fire—for Now—but Laying Plans (WSJ)
  • ECB-Politicians’ Anti-Crisis Bargain Starts to Emerge (Bloomberg)
  • Dollar falls back as non-farm payrolls loom (FT)
  • Ethics Plan to Raise Consumer Confidence (China Daily)
  • Brazil backslides on protecting the Amazon (Reuters) - fair weather progressive idealism?
  • Japan Foreign-Bond Debate May Boost BOJ Stimulus Odds (Bloomberg)
  • Japan’s Lower House Passes Bill to Let Workers Stay on to 65 (Bloomberg)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Of Beggars, Choosers, Unemployment, And Bailouts In Europe





"The problems of a group of 17 different economies that are growing further apart - all functioning under the same currency - will not be solved by any actions taken by the ECB" is how Stratfor's Adriano Bosoni describes the can-kicking that has once again become the euro-zone this summer. From the systemically rising and drastically desperate unemployment rates around the Southern nations, which are not benefiting from the typical seasonal advantages of the Summer tourist trade (since both recessionary contraction of spending and fear of violence are keeping northern Europeans at home); to the Madrid-to-Rome 'demands' in the face of Berlin's clear message, Bosoni notes the ironic fact that 'aid' is there (as Draghi pointed out today) if it is asked for (and an MoU is signed) but both Spain and Italy know full well that the mere act of signing that Memorandum signals the market that a full sovereign bailout is closer at hand and will further steepen yield curves and shrink market access (which in our view is now gone for anything but short-duration issuance in Spain). A succinct 'status update' on where Europe stands.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Lacy Hunt On The Unintended Consequences Of Well-Intended Policies





In addition to the compelling evidence that more active monetary and fiscal policy involvement did not produce beneficial results over the short run, three recent academic studies, though they differ in purpose and scope, all reach the conclusion that extremely high levels of governmental indebtedness diminish economic growth. In other words, deficit spending should not be called "stimulus" as is the overwhelming tendency by the media and many economic writers. Whereas government spending may have been linked to the concept of economic stimulus in distant periods, these studies demonstrate that such an assertion is unwarranted, and blatantly wrong in present circumstances. While officials argue that governmental action is required for political reasons and public anxiety, governments would be better off to admit that traditional tools only serve to compound existing problems.

 
Bruce Krasting's picture

A Hint From Draghi on the Euro?





Far fetched? Yes, but not crazy....

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: August 2





  • What's wrong with this headline: Obama authorizes secret support for Syrian rebels (Reuters)
  • Hilsenrath promptly dusts off ashes of sheer propaganda failure, tries again: Fed Gives Stronger Signals of Action (WSJ)
  • Fed Hints at Fresh Action on Economy (FT)
  • Fed Poised to Step Up Stimulus Unless Economy Strengthens (Bloomberg)
  • IMF Chief Lagarde Praises Greece, Spain for Efforts (Bloomberg) - efforts to beg as loud as possible?
  • US sanctions against bank 'target' China (China Daily)
  • Trimming China's Financial Hedges (WSJ)
  • ganda central bank cuts key lending rate to 17 pct (Reuters)
  • Greece Agrees €11.5bn Spending Cuts (FT) - Agrees? Or does what a good debt slave is told to do
  • Germany Retains Stable AAA Outlook at S&P After Moody’s Cut (Bloomberg)
  • Spain’s Bond Auction Beats Target as Borrowing Costs Rise (Bloomberg)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: When Quantitative Easing Finally Fails





While markets await details on the next round of quantitative easing (QE) -- whether refreshed bond buying from the Fed or sovereign debt buying from the European Central Bank (ECB) -- it's important to ask, What can we expect from further heroic attempts to reflate the OECD economies? The 2009 and 2010 QE programs from the Fed, and the 2011 operations from the ECB, were intended as shock treatment to hopefully set economies on a more typical, post-recession, recovery pathway. Here in 2012, QE was supposed to be well behind us. Instead, parts of Southern Europe are in outright depression, the United Kingdom is in double-dip recession, and the US is sweltering through its weakest “recovery” since the Great Depression. QE is a poor transmission mechanism for creating jobs. It wasn’t supposed to be this way.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Dan Loeb Lets Loose On Barack Obama





Those wondering how the preponderance of Wall Street's buyside community feels about the President, will have their questions answered after reading this blurb from Dan Loab's Q2 letter. "The second quarter was marked by choppy markets caused by fears about Europe, a soft patch in the U.S., more signs of a Chinese slowdown, and U.S. consumers and business owners alike frustrated by the Obama Administration, which is openly hostile to most businesses and unable to articulate or implement policies to spark growth and reduce unemployment. Since ”Euro?phobia” has roiled the markets for over twelve months, we attributed the second quarter’s sell?off mostly to the renewed worries over US weakness and pervasive concerns about a Chinese hard landing, which punished any assets linked to global growth."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Wall Street Gives Treasury Its Blessing To Launch Floaters; Issues Warning On Student Loan Bubble





We previously observed that the US Treasury, under advisement of TBAC Chairman Matt Zames, who currently runs JPM's CIO group in the aftermath of the London #FailWhale and who will become the next JPM CEO after Jamie Dimon decides he has had enough of competing with the Fed over just who it is that run the US capital markets, would soon commence issuing Floating Rate bonds (here and here) as well as the implication that the launch of said product is a green light to get out of Dodge especially if the 1951 Accord is any indication (which as we explained in detail previously was the critical D-Day in which the Fed formerly independent of Treasury control, effectively became a subservient branch of the government, in the process "becoming Independent" according to then president Harry Truman). Sure enough, minutes ago the TBAC just told Tim Geithner they have given their blessing to the launch of Floating Rate Notes. To Wit: "TBAC was unanimous in its support for the introduction of an FRN program as soon as operationally possible. Members felt confident that there would be strong, broad-based demand for the product." Well of course there will be demand - the question is why should Treasury index future cash coupons to inflation when investors are perfectly happy to preserve their capital even if that means collecting 2.5% in exchange for 30 Year paper. What is the reason for this? Why the Fed of course: "Whereas the Fed had, as a matter of practice, reinvested those proceeds in subsequent Treasury auctions, Treasury must now issue that debt to the public to remain cash neutral. For fiscal years 2012-2016, this sums to $667 billion." Slowly but surely, the Fed's intervention in the capital markets is starting to have a structural impact on the US bond market. 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: August 1





  • Bundesbank’s Weidmann Says ECB Shouldn’t Overstep Mandate (Bloomberg)
  • Hollande and Monti Vow to Protect Euro (FT) - be begging Germany to death
  • Monti Calls French, Finns to Action as Italy Yields Rises (Bloomberg)
  • not working though: Banking license for bailout fund is wrong: German Economy Minister (Reuters)
  • Switzerland is ‘New China’ in Currencies (FT)
  • Regulator Says no to Obama Mortgage Write-Down Plan (Reuters) - tough: there will be socialism
  • Gauging the Triggers to Fed Action (WSJ)
  • When domestic monetization is not enough: Azumi Spurns Calls for Bank of Japan to Buy Foreign Bonds to Curb Yen (NYT)
  • Indonesia’s July Inflation Accelerates on Higher Food Prices (Bloomberg) - remember: the Deep Fried black swan
  • China Manufacturing Teeters Close to Contraction (Bloomberg)
  • Spain Introduces Regional Debt Ceilings to Achieve Budget Goals (Bloomberg) - yes, they said "budget goals"
 
Syndicate content
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!