US Futures, European Stocks Rebound, Bonds Fall Ahead Of US Data Deluge

The overnight session started with more weakness out of Asia, where chatter that the BOJ may end up doing nothing despite all the trial balloons (as we hinted yesterday), sent the USDJPY sliding, pushing the Nikkei lower, leading to a 7th consecutive decline in the Topix, the longest such stretch since 2014 even though the BOJ is now actively buying a record amount of ETFs. However, the modest dip in S&P futures and European stocks proved too much for BTFD algos, and risk promptly rebounded.

What's The Real Unemployment Rate? That's The Wrong Question

The truth is the unemployment rate is a political number, not an economic one. If we want an accurate snapshot of employment, earned income and the state of small business, we have hard data that is already collected quarterly. Common sense suggests we will get more value from hard data than from politicized guesswork.

Frontrunning: September 14

  • Bayer wins over Monsanto with improved $66 billion bid (Reuters)
  • Yen trims gains as doubts creep in over BOJ easing (Reuters)
  • BOJ to make negative rates centerpiece of future easing: sources (Reuters)
  • Stocks Halt Selloff in Europe as Commodities Gains Lift Miners (BBG)
  • Donald Trump, New Team Recast His TV Image (WSJ)
  • Hanjin Brings One of World's Busiest Shipping Terminals Close to Standstill (BBG)

Global Market Rout Abates As Bond Selloff Pauses, Oil Rebounds

After a sudden rout in financial markets that wiped $2 trillion in global market cap over the past week showed signs of easing, overnight stocks tried to stage another "BTFD-type" comeback with European stocks climbing for the first time in five days as oil and metals prices gained. S&P futures were modestly in green, although they faded earlier gains, on the back of a slide in the USDJPY which initially spiked to 103.31 only to fade back to the mid 102-range.

Goldman Slashes September Rate-Hike Odds As Hilsenrath Warns Of Divided Fed

Goldman Sachs' estimate of September rate-hike odds continue to collapse faster than Hillary Clinton as the absence of a clear signal from a series of speeches by Fed officials (concluding with Lael Brainard's headfake). Goldman have reduced their subjective odds for a hike next week to 25% from 40% previously (still above market expectations of 13%) but remains hopeful for December. However, as Fed-whisperer WSJ's Jon Hilsenrath warns, Yellen faces record levels of dissent as she "confronts a divided group of policy-makers."

Fed's Lockhart Non-Committal On Rate Hike In September; Sees No Bubbles In Any Asset Markets

First out of the gate among the Fed speakers today (before they go dark) is Dennis Lockhart (non-voter) commenting positively on the economy and jobs, shrugging off the recently terrible ISM data stating "I believe the economy is sustaining sufficient momentum to substantially achieve the committee's monetary policy objectives in an acceptable medium-term time horizon," but questioned inflation still running below mandate.

Time To Get Real, Part 2: "We Need Their Drugs"

On the current path, the world is experiencing the largest artificial asset allocation in modern history, one that is driven by a misguided interest rate regime that has lost its efficacy and is producing more harm than good. Yet the fear of withdrawal pain is keeping central bankers from doing the inevitable: Quit. The response is predictable: "I need the drugs!"

Why One Hedge Fund Is Once Again Preparing For The End Of The Euro

"The time for treating the EUR-peg as a taboo may soon be past us, and an open discussion become the dominant narrative, in pursuit of a long-term durable solution to economic stagnation, in an attempt to save the European Union, so to orderly drive the process as opposed to end up being overwhelmed by the trending course of events."

Incompetent But Not Weak: "The Fed Doesn't Know Whether To Shit Or Go Blind"

The outlook for the US economy is deteriorating, yet the Fed is trying to raise overnight rates to keep unseen inflation from rising. Success in its strategy could force consumption lower, unemployment higher, and exacerbate real output contraction. The market, however, should not underestimate the Fed’s power based on its apparent incompetence.

"If Everything's Going So Great, How Come I'm Not?"

Whether it's struggling to keep up with the rising cost of living, a 0% return on savings, working longer hours while real wages stagnate, scrimping to pay back education loans, despairing at the abuses of power in our banking and political systems, or lamenting the loss of nourishing social interaction in our increasingly isolated and digital lifestyle - most "regular" people find their own personal experiences to be at odds with the rosy "Everything is awesome!" narrative trumpeted by our media.