Unemployment

When Will The Fed Tighten Enough To Cause The Next Recession?

In trying to answer "When will the Fed tighten enough to cause the next recession", Deutsche Bank says that while current market expectations suggest the next recession (or at least the next Fed tightening that would be forceful enough to cause a recession) could still be many years away, the bank "thinks this is too optimistic." Here's why

The Pin To Pop This Mother Of All Bubbles?

"...even more egregious than the misinformation is the complete inappropriateness for the media to praise economic 'strength' while ignoring the role of debt in bringing about the growth being celebrated. If the 'prosperity' is simply due to a drunken debt-binge, it should be criticized, not lauded."

Bill Blain: "It's Tough Being A Central Banker"

How many people seriously believe the strength of the stock market is due to fundamentals of coming explosive growth? Or is the market really focused on the continuing QE cheap money fuelling the equity boom?

Illinois' Economic Growth Is Worse Than During The Great Depression

America’s Great Depression started off worse from 1930-1932, but the recovery came on stronger. By contrast, Illinois did not have as steep of a fall during the first years of the Great Recession, but Illinois’ recovery from the Great Recession has been abysmal.

Goldman's Take On The FOMC: Taper In September, Next Rate Hike In December

As Goldman notes, the Committee expects to begin the process of balance sheet normalization this year, and an updated set of normalization principles clarified the series of caps. Taken together, Goldman continues to expect the announcement of balance sheet normalization in September and a return to rate hikes in December.

When Will Janet Live Up To Her Reputation?

"The bond market is speaking, but most aren’t listening. It is telling us that Yellen is tightening too quickly. Or at least, she is by no means anywhere near as easy as the popular narrative."

Your Last Minute FOMC Preview: "Will It Be A Dovish Hike Or Not"

The FOMC is expected to raise its overnight federal funds rate (FFR) target by 25bps to 1.00% to 1.25%, in what would be its second hike of 2017. Fed Funds Futures were pricing in a 95% implied probability that rates will be lifted – at one point last week, that probability was over 99%.

Goldman Revises FOMC Forecast After Third Consecutive CPI Miss

After core CPI inflation was lower than expected for the third consecutive month, and the year-over-year rate fell two tenths to +1.7%, Goldman has made some changes to what it believes the Fed will report at 2pm today. It now expects the FOMC statement to include a stronger acknowledgement of the recent soft inflation data, and its expectations for the Summary of Economic Projections "have become incrementally more dovish."

Goldman: The Fed Will Hike But Here Are "The Two Most Interesting Questions"

While conceding that a hike is guaranteed, Goldman notes that two issues should make this week's FOMC meeting particularly interesting. First, will Fed officials alter their policy views in response to the increasingly different signals that both sides of the mandate are sending about the urgency of further tightening? Second, will the press conference provide some clarity on what the next tightening step following the June hike will be?

Key Events In The Coming Busy Week: Fed, BOJ, BOE, SNB, US Inflation And Retail Sales

After a tumultous week in the world of politics, with non-stop Trump drama in the US, and votes in the UK, France and Italy, this is shaping up as another busy week ahead with multiple CB meetings, a full data calendar and even another important Eurogroup meeting for Greece. Wednesday's FOMC will be the main event, with the Fed expected to hike 25bp, while the BOJ, BOE and SNB all remain on hold.