United Kingdom

How The Federal Reserve Bailed Out The World

Courtesy of the Fed's own disastrous policy of flooding the market with trillions of cheap credit over the past several decades, the resulting massive one-sided trade of buying dollar denominated securities, funded with inappropriately duration matched products, ended up in $6.5 trillion of Fed-funded global Moral Hazard exposure. When the wheels came off the financial system last fall, the Fed had to step in and bail out all foreign Central Banks. From the BIS: "In providing US dollars on a global scale, the Federal Reserve effectively engaged in international lending of last resort...What pushed the system to the brink was not cross-currency funding per se, but rather too many large banks employing funding strategies in the same direction, the funding equivalent of a crowded trade." The imminent question - How long until the next iteration of the Fiat banking system's most crowded trade (long US-denominated securities, courtesy of a cheap carry trade somewhere in the world) pulls the system back to the brink again?

Leo Kolivakis's picture

Let me repeat what I stated last August. AIMCo is lucky to have Leo de Bever as their new CEO. The politicians in Alberta should give him a chance to prove himself. I am confident he will succeed in building a great team and add long-term value to the funds he's been entrusted to manage.

Leo Kolivakis's picture

If Senator Kennedy were alive today, he would be spearheading the health care debate as well as the pension crisis. And he wouldn't be tweaking anything, but going for an overhaul of the entire system to ensure everyone retires in dignity and security.

Jack H Barnes's picture

In an opinion piece submitted to The Wall Street Journal, U.K. Prime Minister Gordon Brown and French President Nicolas Sarkozy wrote that governments need to act to curb a "dangerously volatile" oil price that defies "the accepted rules of economics" and "could undermine confidence just as we are pushing for recovery."

Hours earlier in Washington, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, the main futures-market regulator in the U.S., announced it would hold hearings on whether to introduce tougher regulation of oil-futures markets. The rules, which drew immediate criticism from traders, would seek to curb the influence of speculative investors such as hedge funds and investment banks by limiting how much money any single trader can bet on any one commodity at a given time.

S&P: United States Safe... In Near Term

The good news:

Currently, 17 of the 124 sovereigns we rate have 'AAA' long-term ratings and stable outlooks. These include close G7 peers, such as Canada, France, and Germany.

We believe the U.S.'s key credit strengths include:

-- A high-income, highly diversified economy, with unusually flexible labor and product markets.

S&P: United States Safe... In Near Term

The good news:

Currently, 17 of the 124 sovereigns we rate have 'AAA' long-term ratings and stable outlooks. These include close G7 peers, such as Canada, France, and Germany.

We believe the U.S.'s key credit strengths include:

-- A high-income, highly diversified economy, with unusually flexible labor and product markets.

S&P: United States Safe... In Near Term

The good news:

Currently, 17 of the 124 sovereigns we rate have 'AAA' long-term ratings and stable outlooks. These include close G7 peers, such as Canada, France, and Germany.

We believe the U.S.'s key credit strengths include:

-- A high-income, highly diversified economy, with unusually flexible labor and product markets.

"Sell Everything: Focus On Stocks And Bonds... Don't Forget Dollars... Oh Yeah, Buy Gold"

Not only is the stock market getting hammered, but 10 Years today, and especially in the last 20 minutes have gotten the biggest beat down in months. Only the dollar is barely holding on to the green, and that is just because people are shocked, SHOCKED, that the UK may not actually be a AAA-rated credit. And the 2s10s.... fugghedaboutit - everyone is piling in short durations.

S&P: U.K.Outlook Revised To Negative

The sovereign downgrade monster is back on the rampage. Earlier today, S&P fired a blank shell straight at the heart of the usurper formerly known as the developed world, when it put UK's credit outlook on negative. The premise: debt/GDP will soon pass 100%. In that case the US should be afraid, very afraid with some estimates for the comparable ratio in the United Printing Presses of America at over 370% (including the kitchen sink).