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Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: August 15





  • This won't end well: Islamists call Cairo protest march as Egypt death toll mounts (Reuters)
  • JPMorgan Said to Expect Multiple Fines for Whale Loss (BBG)
  • Ex-bosses at JPMorgan unlikely to face charges in 'Whale' scandal (Reuters)
  • China could target oil firms, telecoms, banks in price probes (Reuters)
  • For once, it's not the weather's fault: U.K. Retail Sales Increase More Than Forecast on Heatwave (BBG)
  • Japanese visits to shrine on war anniversary anger China (Reuters)
  • India Fighting Worst Crisis Since ’91 Seeks to Buoy Rupee (BBG)
  • Japan Signals Corporate Tax Cut a Long Shot as Deflation Eases (Reuters)
  • Indonesia Tackles Graft in Energy Sector (Reuters)
  • Merkel Touts Strength of German Economy (WSJ)
  • and... British stuntman who parachuted into London Olympics opening ceremony as James Bond dies in fall (AP)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Ghost Of Inflation Future





With all of the problems afflicting the world economy nowadays, inflation seems to be the least of our worries. In addressing the post-2008 economic malaise, which stems from over-indebtedness, policymakers are correct to focus on the threat of debt deflation, which can lead to depression. But dismissing inflation as “yesterday’s problem” could undermine central banks’ efforts to address today’s most pressing issues – and, ultimately, facilitate inflation’s resurgence. Understanding how the Great Inflation from the late 1960’s to the early 1980’s was tamed offers important lessons for addressing far-reaching economic problems, however different ours may be, and provides insight into the dangers that may lie ahead.

 
GoldCore's picture

U.S. Fed and Bank of England: QE Still The Order Of The Day





Evans, who is one of twelve Federal Reserve Presidents, believes that the economic indicators “are actually really better” and this signals a new, more firmer indication from the Fed that tapering is going to happen.

 
Capitalist Exploits's picture

Red Flags!





Lets face it, shysters exist....it's our job to ensure we stay well clear of them. Here are some RED FLAGS to look out for!

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Fed Is The Problem, Not The Solution: The Complete Walk-Through





"Perhaps the success that central bankers had in preventing the collapse of the financial system after the crisis secured them the public's trust to go further into the deeper waters of quantitative easing. Could success at rescuing the banks have also mislead some central bankers into thinking they had the Midas touch? So a combination of public confidence, tinged with central-banker hubris could explain the foray into quantitative easing. Yet this too seems only a partial explanation. For few amongst the lay public were happy that the bankers were rescued, and many on Main Street did not understand why the financial system had to be saved when their own employers were laying off workers or closing down." - Raghuram Rajan

 
Capitalist Exploits's picture

Why I Would NEVER Invest in Early Stage Infrastructure Projects





Investing in early stage large infrastructure projects is notoriously a poor investment for investors. Instead the better option is in buying distressed debt on infrastrucure for cents on the dollar.

 
Capitalist Exploits's picture

Shut up & Grow Some Balls!!





Talk is cheap and action speaks volumes. We may be horribly wrong but we are taking action based on our knowledge. Its time people took responsibility for themselves and stopped bitching.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Cable Carnage Following Carney's First Bank Of England Statement





While it was not surprising that the BOE did nothing to change its rate or QE program, it was surprising (to some) that in the first official statement following the appointment of Goldman's Mark Carney as head of the Bank of England, the bank did mention that forward guidance and intermediate thresholds would likely be considered at the August assessment. Which, of course, is code for expect a major change in monetary policy. And now we also know the date, meaning that some time in August Goldman's latest central bank head will proceed doing what Goldman central bank heads do best: crush currencies in order to boost nominal, not real, returns and ensure another record Goldman bonus pool.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: July 1





  • Pretty much as expected from George W. Bush: Edward Snowden ‘damaged’ security (Politico)
  • Gotta love the Keynesian-Monetarist religion: True 'Bullievers' Are Still Sweet on Japan (WSJ)
  • Canadian Takes Reins at Bank of England (WSJ)
  • Egypt streets quiet, political standoff goes on (Reuters)
  • Private Banks Leave Switzerland as End of Secrecy Hurts (BBG)
  • How Next Debt-Ceiling Fight Could Play Out (WSJ)
  • Easy Money Is Still Central (WSJ)
  • Lew Says China Needs Market Policies and Stop Spying (BBG) - China replies with the same
  • Ireland Preparing Plan to Tap Euro-Area Rescue Fund, Noonan Says (BBG)
  • Poll shows strong shift to Australian PM Rudd, new ministry named (Reuters)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Corzine Officially Charged By CFTC For Filing False Reports, Commingling Funds And Other Violations





... the Complaint charges that MF Global (i) unlawfully failed to notify the CFTC immediately when it knew or should have known of the deficiencies in its customer accounts; (ii) filed false reports with the CFTC that failed to show the deficits in the customer accounts; and (iii) used customer funds for impermissible investments in securities that were not considered readily marketable or highly liquid in violation of CFTC regulation; and that Holdings controlled the operations of MF Global and is therefore liable as a principal for MF Global’s violations of the Commodity Exchange Act and CFTC regulations.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Bank Of International Settlements Warns The Monetary Kool-Aid Party Is Over





"Can central banks now really do “whatever it takes”? As each day goes by, it seems less and less likely... Six years have passed since the eruption of the global financial crisis, yet robust, self-sustaining, well balanced growth still eludes the global economy. If there were an easy path to that goal, we would have found it by now. Monetary stimulus alone cannot provide the answer because the roots of the problem are not monetary.  Many large corporations are using cheap bond funding to lengthen the duration of their liabilities instead of investing in new production capacity...Continued low interest rates and unconventional policies have made it easy for the government to finance deficits, and easy for the authorities to delay needed reforms in the real economy and in the financial system... Overindebtedness is one of the major barriers on the path to growth after a financial crisis. Borrowing more year after year is not the cure...in some places it may be difficult to avoid an overall reduction in accommodation because some policies have clearly hit their limits." - Bank of International Settlements

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: June 20





  • Bonds Tumble With Stocks as Gold Drops in Rout on Fed (BBG)
  • Bernanke Sees Beginning of End for Fed’s Record Easing (BBG)
  • Gold Tumbles to 2 1/2 Year-Low After Fed as Silver Plummets (BBG)
  • PBoC dashes hopes of China liquidity boost (FT)
  • U.S. Icons Now Made of Chinese Steel (WSJ)
  • Emerging Markets Crack as $3.9 Trillion Funds Unwind (BBG)
  • Everyone joins the fun: India sets up elaborate system to tap phone calls, e-mail (Reuters)
  • China Manufacturing Shrinks Faster in Threat to Europe (BBG)
  • More on how Syria's Al-qaeda, and now US, supported "rebels", aka Qatar mercenaries, operate (Reuters)
  • Echoes of Mao in China cash crunch (FT) - how dare a central bank not pander to every bank demand?
  • French watchdog tells Google to change privacy policy (Reuters)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: The Real Story Of The Cyprus Debt Crisis (Part 2)





As noted yesterday, and perhspa even more prescient now Anastasiades is back with the begging bowl, the debt crisis in Cyprus and the subsequent "bail-in" confiscation of bank depositors' money matter for two reasons: 1. The banking/debt crisis in Cyprus shares many characteristics with other banking/debt crises. 2. The official Eurozone resolution of the crisis may provide a template for future resolutions of other banking/debt crises. It also matters for another reason: not only is the bail-in a direct theft of depositors' money, the entire bailout is essentially a wholesale theft of national assets. This is the inevitable result of political Elites swearing allegiance to the European Monetary Union.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: The Real Story Of The Cyprus Debt Crisis (Part 1)





Why do the debt crisis in Cyprus and the subsequent "bail-in" confiscation of bank depositors' money matter? They matter for two reasons: 1. The banking/debt crisis in Cyprus shares many characteristics with other banking/debt crises. 2. The official Eurozone resolution of the crisis--the "bail-in" confiscation of 60% of bank depositors' cash in an involuntary exchange for shares in the bank (which are unlikely to have any future value)--may provide a template for future official resolutions of other banking/debt crises. In other words, since the banking/debt crisis in Cyprus is hardly unique, we can anticipate the resolution (confiscation of deposits) may be applied elsewhere.

 
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