United Kingdom

Are Oil Prices To Blame For The Venezuelan Crisis? (Spoiler Alert: Of Course Not!)

Venezuela is undergoing the typical collapse of a country that has been subject to years of all kinds of political interventions. The fall in oil prices is the external shock that brings to light the embarrassing result of years of price controls, currency controls, nationalizations, uncontrolled monetary creation, and economic dirigisme.

Frontrunning: April 20

  • White House to risk shutdown as Trump searches for “win” (Politico)
  • Saudi Minister Wants OPEC Oil-Production Deal Extended, Perhaps for Less Than 6 Months (WSJ)
  • Russia denies Reuters report think tank drew up plan to sway U.S. election (Reuters)
  • Fed's Kaplan: Three rate rises this year 'still a good baseline' (Reuters)
  • Ex-Arconic CEO Sent Vague Threat to Hedge-Fund Boss (WSJ)

Frontrunning: April 18

  • Britain's May seeks snap election to boost Brexit hand (Reuters)
  • Trump to seek changes in visa program to encourage hiring Americans (Reuters)
  • Trump appointee Gorsuch energetic in first U.S. high court arguments (Reuters)
  • Pence Reaffirms U.S.-Japan Alliance Amid North Korea Provocations (WSJ)
  • Blackwater Founder Erik Prince Said to Have Advised Trump Team (BBG)

Where Does The World's Biggest Oil Importer Get Its Crude

China is the world’s largest net importer of crude oil, and in recent years, China’s crude oil imports have increasingly come from countries outside the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). While OPEC countries still made up most (57%) of China’s 7.6 million barrels per day (b/d) of crude oil imports in 2016, crude oil from non-OPEC countries made up 65% of the growth in China’s imports between 2012 and 2016.