Volatility

Tyler Durden's picture

Latest Central Bank Sticksave Halts Futures Slide, Sends E-Mini Soaring After ECB Said "Looking To Buy Bonds"





To summarize: the S&P 500 is now almost 100 points higher from last Tuesday as the global central bank plunge protection team of first Williams and Bullard hinting at QE4, then ECB's Coeure "ECB buying to start in a few days", then China's latest $30 billion "targeted stimulus", then the Japanese GPIF hinting at a 25% stock rebalancing in the pension fund, and finally again the ECB, this time "buying of corporate bonds on secondary markets", rolls on and manages to send stocks into overdrive. Even as absolutely nothing has been fixed, as Europe is still tumbling into a triple-drip recession, as Emerging Markets are being slammed by a global growth slowdown and the US corporate earnings picture is as bleak as it gets. Because "fundamentals."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Santelli & Schiff: "A Messy Exit Is A Given... Ending QE Will Plunge US Into Severe Recession"





"Markets are slowly coming to grips with reality is not going to be as easy as everybody thought," Peter Schiff tells CNBC's Rick Santelli, noting the pick up in volatility across asset classes recently. What The Fed clearly does not understand, Schiff blasts, is that "you cannot end quantitative easing without plunging the US into a severe recession." Because of the Fed's extreme monetary policy and the mal-investment that flows from it, Schiff says, "The US economy is more screwed up now than it's ever been in history." Most prophetically, we suspect, Santelli agrees that "a messy exit is a given," and Schiff believes they know that and that is why QE4 is coming simply "because it hasn't worked and they can't admit it's been a dismal failure."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Stocks Green Despite Big Blue; Greenback & Black Gold Red





If only stock indices only included stocks that were green... IBM's 80-point weight on the Dow disappointed some but that was no problem for the index-pushers who needed the S&P 500 to tap its 200DMA. The only thing that mattered to stocks today was EURJPY... and that managed to get the S&P 500 'almost' to its 200DMA (but noit quite) and ensure a green close for the Dow. The USDollar slipped lower all day (-0.4%) led by EUR and GBP strength. Gold ($1245) and silver gained on the day but even with a weak USD, oil and copper dropped (with oil very volatile). US Treasury yields drifted lower by 1-2bps (thin trading) decoupling from the post-European close exuberance in stocks. HY credit decoupled from stocks initially (post-Europe) but as stocks ramped so did spreads and VIX continues to run ahead of stocks (under 19 today) as it appears hedges are being lifted. Of course, AAPL was a big help, up over 2% pushing back towards its magical $100 ahead of this evening's results. S&P futures volume was dismally low.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

On The Origin Of Crashes & Clustering Of Large Losses





"...the underlying cause of a crash will be found in the preceding months or years, in the progressively increasing build-up of market cooperativity, or effective interactions between investors, often translating into accelerating ascent of the market price (the bubble). According to this ‘critical’ point of view, the specific manner by which prices collapsed is not the most important problem: a crash occurs because the market has entered an unstable phase and any small disturbance or process may have triggered the instability."

 
GoldCore's picture

Euro Risk Due To Possible Return of Italy To Lira - Drachmas, Escudos, Pesetas and Punts?





The European status quo and EU elites are becoming increasingly concerned by popular calls in Italy for Italy to leave the European Monetary Union and the euro "as soon as possible" and return to the lira. 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: October 20





  • Stick to tapering and rates pledge, says Boston Fed chief (FT)
  • Turkey to let Iraqi Kurds reinforce Kobani as U.S. drops arms to defenders (Reuters)
  • Obama makes rare campaign trail appearance, some leave early (Reuters)
  • Japan GPIF to Boost Share Allocation to About 25%, Nikkei Says (BBG)... or three months of POMO
  • Japan Stocks Surge on Report GPIF to Boost Local Shares (BBG)
  • China Growth Seen Slowing Sharply Over Decade (WSJ)
  • Russia, Ukraine Edge Closer to Natural-Gas Deal (WSJ)
  • Leveraged Money Spurs Selloff as Record Treasuries Trade (BBG)
  • After clashes, Hong Kong students, government stand their ground before talks (Reuters)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Europe’s Fatal Flaw Laid Bare For All To See. Again.





The lofty leaders at the ECB, and Berlin, Paris, Brussels, pretend they can make everything right that’s wrong inside their toy monetary union through asset purchases, sovereign bond purchases, and anything that falls in the ‘whatever it takes’ category. But it’s all just bluff. Because, what it all boils down to, they can’t keep buying Greek bonds with German taxpayer money until the end of time. And the markets know this.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Market Uncertainty Has Never Been Higher





The CBOE's VVIX Index, "an indicator of the expected volatility of the 30-day forward price of the VIX" reached extreme levels this week. While all eyes are firmly focused on the to-ing and fro-ing of VIX (the so-called 'fear' indicator), it is the uncertainty of that fear (or greed) that is exploding as VVIX measures. Simply put, the chance of VIX doubling, or tripling, in the next 30 days (which include the final POMO and Fed 'end of QE' meeting), has never been higher.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Markets & Ebola: Confusion, Containment, & Complexity





The level of micro-management by the Fed appears to have reached a new shockingly high plateau. Recently prices have been driven more by liquidity, fear, greed, and Fed policy, than by valuation.  It is time that the Fed stops being a source of interference and confusion. There are also two less obvious or less discussed economic reasons why the Obama administration may be urgently focusing more on the Ebola crises.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

5 Things To Ponder: "Buy" or "Run"





This past week investors took a blow from a sharp selloff in the financial markets. Now that the correction has occurred, at least to some degree, the question that must be answered is simply: “Is it over?” That is the basis of this weekend’s reading list which is a compilation of reads that debate this point. The bulls remain wildly bullish, believing that this is simply a “dip” in the ongoing “bull market.” The more pessimistic crowd sees the opposite.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

How To Recognize Them: A Visual History Of The Most Popular Market Tops And Bottoms





Few are the market makers that make money no matter what the market does (especially since HFT firms, long since exposed for merely frontrunning big order blocks instead of providing liquidity, are now disappearing at an accelerating pace), and there are those who, rigged casino analogies notwithstanding, still want to place their money in the market betting on either more upside or downside. For their benefit a few days ago we posted "The "Crazy Ivan" Playbook: How To Time A Near-Term Market Bottom" however, we realize that most people are visual learners, so for them, here is the Investor Business Daily's compendium of the most notable market tops and bottoms in recent market history.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Calling The Fed's Bluff





If U.S. stocks have stabilized – granted, a big 'IF' - you can thank the fact that markets don’t believe the Federal Reserve’s outlook on interest rates. Bad news will keep the doves “Fed” (yes, a pun…  it’s Friday) and the hawks at bay. A spate of good U.S. news while the rest of the developed world slows is the worst potential outcome in this narrative.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Deflation Flirts With America





"I see deflation flirting with America." Retail sales equals consumer spending equals velocity of money. And unless the money supply is rising, hardly likely in the taper, less spending is deflation by definition. Forget about PMI and all that kind of data, it’s much simpler than that. Central banks can do all kinds of stuff, but they can’t make us spend our money on things we don’t want or need. Let alone make us borrow to do so. And if we don’t, deflation is an inevitable fact. That doesn’t mean prices for some items won’t go up, but that’s not what counts. It’s about how fast we either spend the money we have – if we have any left – or how much we borrow. And if time is money, then borrowed money is borrowed time. So we really shouldn’t.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Futures Surge After ECB Verbal Intervention Talks Up Stocks, Day After Fed





If the last three days all started with a rout in futures before the US market open only to ramp higher all day, today it may well be the opposite, when shortly after Europe opened it was the ECB's turn to talk stocks higher, when literally within minutes of the European market's open, ECB's Coeure said that:

  • COEURE SAYS ECB WILL START WITHIN DAYS TO BUY ASSETS

Which was today's code word for all is clear, and within minutes US futures, which until that moment had languished unchanged, soared by 25 points. So will today be more of the same and whatever early action was directed by the central bankers will be faded into a weekend in which only more bad news can come out of Ebola-land?

 
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