• GoldCore
    08/01/2014 - 02:42
    The stealth phenomenon that is silver stackers or long term store of value buyers of silver coins and bars continues and is seen in the record levels of demand for silver eagles from the U.S. Mint....

World Bank

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Frontrunning: March 23, 2012





  • More HFT Posturing: SEC Probes Rapid Trading (WSJ)
  • Fed’s Bullard Says Monetary Policy May Be at Turning Point (Bloomberg)
  • Hilsenrath: Fed Hosts Global Gathering on Easy Money (WSJ)
  • Dublin ‘hopeful’ ECB will approve bond deal (FT)
  • EU Proposes a Beefed-Up Permanent Bailout Fund (WSJ)
  • Portugal Town Halls Face Default Amid $12 Billion Debt (Bloomberg)
  • Hidden Fund Fees Means U.K. Investors Pay Double US Rates (Bloomberg)
  • Europe Weighs Trade Probes Amid Beijing Threats (WSJ)
  • Bank of Japan Stimulus Row Fueled by Kono’s Nomination (Bloomberg)
 
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Frontrunning: March 14





  • Euro zone formally approves 2nd Greek bailout: statement (Reuters)
  • In a First, Europeans Act to Suspend Aid to Hungary Unless It Cuts Deficit (NYT)
  • UK Chancellor Looks at 100-Year Gilt (FT) - What? No Consols?
  • Hilsenrath: Fed's Outlook a Tad Sunnier - (WSJ)
  • Banks Shored Up By Stress Test Success (FT)
  • U.S. dangles secret data for Russia missile shield approval (Reuters)
  • Wen Warns of Second China Cultural Revolution Without Reform (Bloomberg)
  • Wen Says Yuan May Be Near Equilibrium as Gains Stall (Bloomberg)
  • Merkel Says Europe Is ‘Good Way’ Up Mountain, Not Over It (Bloomberg)
 
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China Moves To Further Marginalize Dollar: Offers CNY-Denominated BRIC Loans





Today we observed how as the US is considering releasing crude from its Political, pardon Strategic Petroleum Reserve, China was doing just the opposite. Now, in a further step confirming that China is acting as a much more rational capitalist power, and is rapidly encroaching on the "reserve" status of the sacrosanct USD, the FT writes that China intends to extend renminbi loans to other BRIC nations in "another step toward the internationalisation of its currency." To those following the stealthy Chinese incursion into currency markets as a dollar alternative, this is not news: already we know that China and Japan have bypassed the dollar entirely and now engage in direct bilateral trade using JPY and CNY (even as most other nations in Asia have developed bilateral agreements to transact in a non dollar basis). This is merely the latest incremental step which will see China become the dominant player in the currency arena, and further puts to doubt the fate of the US Dollar as the default currency. Of course, the market will not acknowledge any of this until the developing (i.e., non-insolvent world) is transacting entirely with US intermediation. And at that point, the US will be merely another Zimbabwe case study, where it can print all the money it wants to fund its deficit, and the only ones who care will be wheelbarrow manufacturers.

 
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Frontrunning: March 7





  • Key rate for $350 trillion market in limbo - Libor Links Deleted as U.K. Bank Group Backs Away From Rate (Bloomberg)
  • Rift Grows Between Germany's Bundesbank and ECB (Spiegel)
  • Athens issues threat to bond holdouts (FT)
  • SNB to Reveal Board Members’ Currency Transactions After Hildebrand Furor (Bloomberg)
  • Sarkozy Floats New Corporate Tax (WSJ)
  • Super Tuesday Ensures a GOP War of Attrition (WSJ)
  • Martin Wolf - The pain in Spain will test the euro (FT)
  • Refinancing Fees Are Reduced for Some F.H.A. Borrowers (NYT)
 
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Daily US Opening News And Market Re-Cap: March 2





European indices are trading in minor positive territory ahead of the North American open with tentative risk appetite. This follows news that the EU leaders have signed off on the EU fiscal pact, with German Chancellor Merkel commenting that 25 out of 27 countries have signed the agreement. The effects of the ECB’s LTRO continue to trickle through as the ECB announce they received record overnight deposits of EUR 777bln from European Banks. Little in the way of data today, however UK construction PMI released earlier in the session recorded the highest rate of increase in new orders for 21 months. In the energy complex, Brent futures have come down below USD 125.00 from yesterday’s highs with WTI echoing the movements, following market reaction to the confirmation that there were no acts of sabotage on Saudi pipelines yesterday, according to Saudi officials. EUR-led currency pairs are trading down on the session, and USD/JPY continues to climb, hitting a 9 month high earlier today at 81.72.

 
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Frontrunning: February 27





  • Germany Crisis Role in Focus After G-20 Rebuff (Bloomberg)
  • G20 to Europe: Show us the money (Reuters)
  • Draghi’s Unlimited Loans Are No Panacea (Bloomberg)
  • Geithner says Europe has lowered risks of "catastrophe" (Reuters)
  • Gone in 22 Seconds (WSJ)
  • Gillard beats Rudd to stay Australian PM (FT)
  • Brazil Will Continue Reducing Interest Rates, Tombini Says (Bloomberg)
  • China to Have ‘Soft Landing’ Soon: Zoellick (Bloomberg)
  • China To Be Largest Economy Before 2030: World Bank (Reuters)
  • Obama pressed to open emergency oil stocks (FT)
 
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Overnight Sentiment Negative Following Failure To Boost IMF Rescue Fund





Overnight sentiment is significantly negative, with stocks, bond yields, risk currencies lower after G-20 over the weekend refused to increase IMF funding. The result is an end to the buoyant market sentiment of recent days which has seen the Dax down 1.2%, bund, UST yields lower, and US futures lower. As many had expected, the G-20 has rebuffed EU leaders' request for more assistance, which in turn has placed the onus on Germany to find a way to resolve its internal conflict vis-a-vis a Greek bailout, ironically as many believe that it is Germany who more than anyone wants Greece out. This happens as the Bundestag votes today on second aid package today; Merkel’s government must decide whether to back plans at this week’s summit to combine EFSF and ESM. In other news, tomorrow the ECB will call for bids for the second 3 Year LTRO tomorrow, with results announced on February 29. And with the ECB's deposit facility at €477 billion, it is rather clear that the banks will park the bulk of new proceeds with the ECB once again, where it will continue to be a negative carry trade, earning 0.25% at a cost of 1.00%. And somehow this is favorable for the European sovereign bond market, which continues to ignore the various layers of subordination it is now working under. We expect the market revulsion to this flaw to be violent when it comes, and will result in a rapid and sudden divergence between the various subordinated tranches of sovereign bonds.

 
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Guest Post: World Bank Wants Control Of The High Seas





At bottom, centralization is the foundation for the collectivist fallacy; that there is a “greater good” that must be maintained by the establishment.  This process makes the establishment indispensable in the minds of the public.  The elites in power today have chosen environmental dogma as their version of the “greater good”, because the “end of the world as we know” can be used to rationalize almost any brand of despotic behavior, from food and water rationing as a method for social conditioning, to population control or even depletion in the name of “saving the planet”.  Always beware the true motivations of any governing institution that seeks to assert itself as the purveyor of all that is “best” for the people.  Such groups are rarely if ever what they seem…

 
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Daily US Opening News And Market Re-Cap: February 23





Despite the release of better than expected German IFO survey, stocks in Europe remained on the back foot after the EU Commission slashed forecasts for 2012 Eurozone GDP to -0.3% vs. 0.5% previously, while EU's Rehn added that the Euroarea has entered a mild recession. As a result Bunds advanced back towards 139.00, whereas the spread between the Italian/German 10-year bond yields widened marginally on the back of touted selling by both domestic and foreign accounts ahead of the upcoming supply on Friday. Looking elsewhere, EUR/USD erased barriers at 1.3300 and 1.3325, while today’s strength in GBP/USD can be attributed to a weaker USD, as well as touted EUR/GBP selling by a UK clearer.

 
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Iran Holds Air Defense Drills As IAEA Says Iran Blocks Access To Key Nuclear Site





As if the market needed another bizarro catalyst to ramp even higher courtesy of an even more pronounced drop in corporate earnings courtesy of soaring energy costs, that is just what it is about to get following news of further deterioration in the Nash equilibrium in Iran, where on one hand we learn that IAEA just pronounced Iran nuclear talks a failure (this is bad), and on the other Press TV reports that the Iran army just started a 4 day air defense exercise in a 190,000 square kilometer area in southern Iran (this is just as bad). The escalation "ball" is now in the Western court. And if Iraq is any indication, after IAEA talks "failure" (no matter how grossly manipulated by the media), the aftermath is usually always one and the same...

 
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Frontrunning: February 16





  • Europe Demands More Greek Budget Controls in Bid to Forge Rescue (Bloomberg)
  • Moody's Warns May Downgrade 17 Global Banks, Securities Firms (Reuters)
  • Officials at Fed Split on More Bond Buys (Hilsenrath)
  • Greek deal delays pressure periphery (Reuters)
  • Talk, but No Action, to Break US Grip on World Bank Job (Reuters)
  • Greek Rhetoric Turns Into Battle of Wills (FT)
  • Greece Seeks Monday Bailout Deal, EU Questions Remain (Reuters)
  • US Lawmakers Announce Payroll Tax-Cut Deal (Reuters)
  • China Leader-In-Waiting Xi Woos and Warns US (Reuters)
  • China's FDI falls 0.3% in Jan (Reuters)
 
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Guest Post: Confidence And Ruin Amongst The PIIGS





For today's installment we'll take a look at the debt:gold ratio for the PIIGS countries to see who puts the IG in PIIGS (perhaps you've already guessed). the ratio represents the multiple by which the country's debt exceeds its gold holdings. To an optimist, a high ratio means that the rest of the world has great confidence in the economy of the country in question. To a pessimist, a high ratio means the country is ruined. At a quick glance, it appears that Italy is no worse off than America--assuming that both countries actually have the gold the World Gold Council claims they have. Italy may have trouble getting theirs from New York, if that is where it is. Notice the decline in the ratio over the past decade--that is a reflection of the rising price of gold, not a decline in these nations' debts. Debt has increased over the past decade. The price of gold has apparently risen more. So does this mean these countries are becoming solvent? Can a rising price of gold solve our economic woes? Historically, a decline in this ratio can been used by governments to justify monetary expansion, particularly if it happened during an episode of such expansion. Why not? The improvement of the ratio suggests that the government isn't printing enough. The destruction of the value of the currency (and the country's debt) begins to occur faster than the rate of monetary creation (thus the label in the US graph "Ben proposes, the Market disposes"). The government counters this by printing faster, but the destruction of the currency's value is faster still.

 
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