World Bank

Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Is Water The New Oil?





The sharpening international geopolitical competition over natural resources has turned some strategic resources into engines of power struggle. Transnational water resources have become an especially active source of competition and conflict, triggering a dam-building race and prompting growing calls for the United Nations to recognize water as a key security concern. With the era of cheap, bountiful water having been replaced by increasing supply and quality constraints, many investors are beginning to view water as the new oil. Political and economic water wars are already being waged in several regions, reflected in dam construction on international rivers and coercive diplomacy or other means to prevent such works. The World Bank estimates that such constraints are costing China 2.3% of GDP. In short, we must focus on addressing our water-supply problems as if our lives depended on it. In fact, they do.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: The Snowden Time-Bomb





In the aftermath of the global financial crisis, world leaders repeated a soothing mantra. There could be no repeat of the Great Depression, not only because monetary policy was much better (it was), but also because international cooperation was better institutionalized. And yet one man, the American former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden, has shown how far removed from reality that claim remains. Prolonged periods of strain tend to weaken the fabric of institutional cooperation. The two institutions that seemed most dynamic and effective in 2008-2009 were the International Monetary Fund and the G-20; the credibility of both has been steadily eroded over the long course of the crisis. The Snowden affair has blown up any illusion about trust between leaders – and also about leaders’ competence.

 
Pivotfarm's picture

Brazil: Not the Place to Be!





Today average Brazilians are having trouble making ends meet paying for everyday products or household goods. Riots erupted in Brazil against the Pope’s visit to Rio de Janeiro.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

40 Stats That Show The U.S. Economy's Real Collapse Over The Past Decade





The "coming economic collapse" has already been happening.  You see, the truth is that the economic collapse is not a single event.  It has already started, it is happening right now, and it will accelerate during the years ahead.  The statistics in this article show very clearly that the U.S. economy has fallen dramatically over the past ten years or so. The mainstream media will continue to scoff knowingly, "An economic collapse is never going to happen.  We can consume far more wealth than we produce forever.  We can pile up gigantic mountains of debt forever.  There is no way that the party is over.  In fact, the party is just getting started.  Woo-hoo!"Anyone with half a brain should be able to see what is coming.  Just open your eyes and look at the facts...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Fed Is The Problem, Not The Solution: The Complete Walk-Through





"Perhaps the success that central bankers had in preventing the collapse of the financial system after the crisis secured them the public's trust to go further into the deeper waters of quantitative easing. Could success at rescuing the banks have also mislead some central bankers into thinking they had the Midas touch? So a combination of public confidence, tinged with central-banker hubris could explain the foray into quantitative easing. Yet this too seems only a partial explanation. For few amongst the lay public were happy that the bankers were rescued, and many on Main Street did not understand why the financial system had to be saved when their own employers were laying off workers or closing down." - Raghuram Rajan

 
smartknowledgeu's picture

Let Freedom Reign This July 4th By Withdrawing All Assets From the Global Banking Slavery System





Whether or not you believe PMs will serve as the ultimate store of wealth as the global fiat monetary system collapses should have absolutely no bearing on making the intelligent decision to remove your financial assets from under the domain and inevitable confiscation of global bankers and their State-run tyrannies.  Independence Day is a fine day to start the process of taking back our freedoms from the tyrants that rule over us.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

36 Tough Questions About The U.S. Economy That Everyone Should Be Asking





If the economy is improving, then why aren't things getting better for most average Americans?  They tell us that the unemployment rate is going down, but the percentage of Americans that are actually working is exactly the same it was three years ago.  They tell us that American families are in better financial shape now, but real disposable income is falling rapidly.  They tell us that inflation is low, but every time we go shopping at the grocery store the prices just seem to keep going up.  They tell us that the economic crisis is over, and yet poverty and government dependence continue to explode to unprecedented heights.  There seems to be a disconnect between what the government and the media are telling us and what is actually true. The following are 36 hard questions about the U.S. economy that everyone should be asking...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Days Of The Super-Powered Chinese Economy Are Over





Last week's liquidity crunch and market panic is a reminder that Beijing is playing a difficult game. Regardless of what happens next, the consensus expectations that China's economy will grow at roughly 7 percent over the next few years can be safely ignored. Growth driven by consumption, instead of trade and investment, is alone sufficient to grow China's GDP by 3 to 4 percent annually. But it is not clear that consumption can be sustained if investment growth levels are sharply reduced. If Beijing can successfully manage the employment consequences of decreased investment growth, perhaps it can keep consumption growing at current levels. But that's a tricky proposition. It's likely that the days of the super-powered Chinese economy are over. Instead, Beijing must content itself with grinding its way through the debt that has accumulated over the past decade.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: June 28





  • Fashionable 'Risk Parity' Funds Hit Hard (WSJ)
  • No 1997 Asian Crisis Return as China Trembles (BBG)
  • Greece Faces Collapse of Second Key Privatization (FT)
  • China Bad-Loan Alarm Sounded by Record Bank Spread Jump (BBG)
  • Iranian official signals no scaling back in nuclear activity (Reuters)
  • Asmussen Says Any QE Discussions at ECB Not Policy Relevant (BBG)
  • Flat Japanese consumer prices aid Kuroda (FT)
  • Vietnam Devalues Dong for First Time Since ’11 to Boost Reserves (BBG)
  • World Bank Sees ‘Vulnerable’ Food System on Climate Change (BBG)
  • Fed big-hitters seek to quash QE fears (FT)
  • EU Leaders Set to Slow Support for Ailing Banks (BBG)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

What The Fed Is Looking At





A sense among investors that the global economy is unraveling has injected tremendous volatility into the markets. As Bloomberg's Rich Yamarone notes, if the global equity market decline is not a “Sell in May” event, but the beginning of a great unwinding, then the economy, skating on thin ice, may be even more susceptible to recession. However, most of the US equity disconnect from the reality of weak data (and other markets) can be laid at the feet of the Fed's ever-generous monetary policy. However, given all of this 'weakness' - or missing of Fed benchmarks that we discuss below - that the Fed is well aware of, we ask again, why would so many members have been out discussing 'Taper' if it were not due to their concerns of broken markets and bubble conditions.

 
Pivotfarm's picture

Stock-Market Crashes Through the Ages – Part II – 19th Century





Stock-market crashes saw the light of day more and more as the world became industrialized. The 19th century saw a rapid increase in their numbers.

 
David Fry's picture

Bernanke And His Game Of Chicken





We’ll know more next week Wednesday when the Fed meeting concludes with a language parsing contest. In the meantime, stock market volatility is increasing as we’re experiencing alternating triple digit days now.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: June 13





  • Global shares pummeled, dollar slumps as rout gathers pace (Reuters)
  • Hong Kong to Handle NSA Leaker Extradition Based on Law (BBG)
  • Lululemon chairman sold $50 million in stock before CEO's surprise departure (Reuters)
  • Companies scramble for consumer data (FT)
  • Traders Pay for an Early Peek at Key Data (WSJ)
  • When innovation dies: Apple looking at bigger iPhone screens, multiple colors (Reuters)
  • Washington pushed EU to dilute data protection (FT)
  • Japan-U.S. drill to retake remote island kicks off (Japan Times)
  • EM economies in danger of overheating, World Bank says (FT)
  • Don't forget the Indian crisis: Chidambaram seeks to quell concerns over rupee (FT)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Sea Of Red





In the brief but tempestuous fight between Abe and the "deflation monster", the latter is now victoriously romping through an irradiated Tokyo, if last night's epic (ongoing) collapse in the Nikkei is any indication: down 6.4%, crushing anyone who listened to Goldman's "buy Nikkei" recommendation which has now been stopped out at a major loss in three days, and now well in bear-market territory, it would appear that a neurotic Mrs. Watanabe is finally with done with daytrading the Pennikkeistock market, and demands Shirakawa's deflationary, triumphal return to finally clam the market. Only this time the Japan's selling tsunami is finally starting to spill, if not to the US just yet (it will) then certainly to Asia, where the Shanghai Composite which was down 2.7%, and is once again well down for the year, and virtually all other Asian stock markets. Except for Pakistan - the Karachi Stock Exchange is an island of stability in the Asian sea of red.

 
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