World Gold Council

One Simple Reason Why Gold Can Still Jump 50%

Stocks are very expensive. Bonds are insane. Bank rates are negative for many large investors. These trends are pretty clear - there will likely be more debt, more money printing, more capital controls, and more monetary insanity in the future...And if you understand them, the case for owning at least a small amount of gold is obvious.

Frontrunning: August 11

  • Stocks choppy, Kiwi soars after rate cut (Reuters)
  • Putin discusses Crimea security after alleged Ukrainian incursions (Reuters)
  • IEA Sees Oil Glut Easing (BBG)
  • Meanwhile: more oil - Iraq, oil companies agree to restart investment, boost output (Reuters)
  • U.S. Drillers Need $60 Oil to Stage Real Comeback, IEA Say (BBG)

US Futures Rebound, European Stocks Higher As Oil Rises

The summer doldrums continue with another listless overnight session, not helpd by Japan markets which are closed for holiday, as Asian stocks fell fractionally, while European stocks rebounded as oil trimmed losses after the the IEA said pent-up demand would absorb record crude output (something they have said every single month). S&P futures have wiped out almost all of yesterday's losses and were up over 0.2% in early trading.

The Charade Continues: London Gold And Silver Markets Set For Even More Paper Trading

Today the London Metal Exchange (LME) and the World Gold Council (WGC) jointly announced the launch next year of standardised gold and silver spot and futures contracts which will trade on the LME’s electronic platform LMESelect, will clear on the LME central clearing platform LME Clear, and that will be settled ‘loco London’. Together these new products will be known as LMEprecious.’

Japanese Savers Flood Into Gold Fearing The Endgame Is Close

"For investors, buying gold is similar to casting a no-confidence vote," saidItsuo Toshima, 68, an investment adviser and former regional manager for the World Gold Council in Tokyo. "Gold is the unprintable currency, unlike the yen. The yen’s appreciation in spite of the adoption of the negative-rate policy has kindled skepticism about the policy’s benefits. It’s also led to investors seeking to protect their assets in case Abenomics fails.”