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Marc To Market's picture

FX: Diverging Performances





It is difficult to talk about the dollar in the abstract, especially when it is falling against the dollar-bloc and rising against the euro bloc.  Dispassionate overview.  

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Zen And The Art Of Trading Crude With Dennis Gartman





He's funny cause he's... funny.

We are short of Brent while long of WTI, but the political situation over which we’ve no control has taken control of  this spread rendering our position intolerable and forcing us to run for cover upon receipt of this commentary. Not to do so would be trading foolishness of the first order

Because in all other situtations when Gartman "puts" on crude positions (with whose money?) which are always a function of geopolitics, he does so only when he has control over the "political situation"? Gotcha.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

How Japan Blew Its Savings Surplus: What A Keynesian Dystopia Looks Like





Financially speaking, Japan is fast becoming a Keynesian dystopia. Its entire economy is now hostage to a fiscal time bomb. Namely, government debt which already exceeds 240% of GDP and which is growing rapidly because even the recent traumatic increase in the sales tax from 5% to 8% does not come close to filling the fiscal gap. Moreover, even at today’s absurdly low and BOJ rigged bond rate of 0.6% nearly 25% of government revenue is absorbed by interest payments. Now comes the coup de grace, as Kyle Bass predicted, Japan’s savings rate has collapsed and its vaunted current account surplus is about ready to disappear.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Millionaires Account For More Than 10% Of All Households In These Countries





When one thinks of millionaires and billionaires, the countries USA, China and UK usually come to mind. And while in terms of absolute numbers of millionaires and ultra high net worth individuals (those with more than $100 million in assets) this would be correct (and since these countries also have the greatest number of poor people too, it merely confirms the record gap between the rich and poor), a very different view emerges when observing the world's uber wealthy not on an absolute but relative basis. In that case, when ranked by millionaires as a proportion of the population, the top three nations are Qatar, Switzerland and Singapore where millionaires account for more than 10% of all households, while a ranking of the most UHNW individuals per 100,000 households gives Hong Kong, Switzerland and Austria in the top three spots.

 
Marc To Market's picture

FX: As You Were





A look at the likely price action in the forex market in the week ahead.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Abenomics' Legacy: Japan's Greatest "Misery" In 33 Years





Meet Mieko Tatsunami, a 70 year old retired kimono dresser from Tokyo. Unlike the scores of paid actors ordered to pitch Abenomics and to spread the gospel of rising asset prices, Mieko shares a most rare commodity in this day of pervasive propaganda: the truth. “The price of everything we eat on a daily basis is going up,” Tatsunami, 70, a retired kimono dresser, said while shopping in Tokyo’s Sugamo area. “I’m making do by halving the amount of meat I serve and adding more vegetables.” Ironically, that's what Americans are doing too. Only here the "halving" of the food is done by the food producers, while the consumers rarely if ever notices that they are paying the same amount for ever lesser amounts of food. At least in Japan they are honest about the food inflation. As Bloomberg shows, Tatsunami’s concerns stem from the price of food soaring at the fastest pace in 23 years after April’s sales-tax increase. Rising prices helped push the nation’s misery index to the highest level since 1981, while wages adjusted for inflation fell the most in more than four years.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Not An Algo Is Stirring Ahead Of The ECB's Announcement





In today's abnormally quiet overnight session one could hear a pin, or the USDJPY, drop: with everyone focusing on the ECB announcement in one hour, not a single algo is willing to make any big moves, or even start some momentum ignition, ahead of Draghi's announcement, which absent launching full scale QE, which it won't, will be a disappointment which means the EUR will ultimatly move higher after a kneejerk lower as the market forces Super Mario to do even more next time. As Bloomberg adds, a cut in refi and deposit rates is fully priced in and latest price action suggests investors brace for     disappointment if ECB stops short of signaling asset purchases or other liquidity measures to combat deflation.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Paul Volcker Proposes A New Bretton Woods System To Prevent "Frequent, Destructive" Financial Crises





We found it surprising that it was none other than Paul Volcker himself who, on May 21 at the annual meeting of the Bretton Woods Committee, said that "by now I think we can agree that the absence of an official, rules-based cooperatively managed, monetary system has not been a great success. In fact, international financial crises seem at least as frequent and more destructive in impeding economic stability and growth." We can, indeed, agree. However, we certainly disagree with Volcker's proposal for a solution to this far more brittle monetary system: a new Bretton Woods.

 
testosteronepit's picture

The Wrath of Abenomics: Sales Collapse, Inflation Soars





Even soothsayers and Abenomics spin doctors expected a downdraft after Japan’s consumption tax was jacked up. But not this.

 
Phoenix Capital Research's picture

The Epic Failure of Keynesianism in Japan





The Keynesians have failed. Japan has proved it. It’s only a matter of time before the rest of the world… and the markets catch on.

 
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Equity Blow Off Top Takes Brief Overnight Rest, Prepares For Another Session Of Low Volume Levitation





Last night's docket of atrocious Japanese economic data inexplicably managed to push the Nikkei lower, not because the data was ugly but because the scorching inflation - the highest since 1991 - mostly driven by import costs, food and energy as a result of a weak yen, and certainly not in wages, has pushed back most banks' estimates of additional QE to late 2014 if not 2015 which is as we predicted would happen over a year ago. As a result the market, addicted to central bank liquidity, has had to make a modest reassessment of just how much disconnected from reality it is willing to push equities relative to expectations of central bank balance sheet growth. However, now that the night crew trading the USDJPY is replaced with the US session algo shift which does a great job of re-levitating the pair, and with it bringing the S&P 500 higher, we expect this brief flicker of red futures currently observable on trading terminals to be promptly replaced with the friendly, well-known and "confidence-boosting" green. The same goes for Treasurys which lately have been tracking every directional move in stocks not in yield but in price.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

CNBC Confused As To Why Interest Rates Are Falling





It was interesting over the last couple of days to watch a series of both hosts and analysts scratching their heads and fumbling for answers over the recent decline in interest rates. After all, how could this be with inflation creeping up due to much stronger economic growth? More importantly, asset prices are clearly telling investors to get out of bonds as the "great rotation" is upon us as we launch into this new secular bull market, right? The recent decline in interest rates should really not be a surprise as there is little evidence that current rates of economic growth are set to increase markedly anytime soon. Consumers are still heavily levered, wage growth remains anemic, and business owners are still operating on an "as needed basis." This "economic reality" continues to constrain the ability of the economy to grow organically.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Why Are Food Prices So High?





Anyone who buys their own groceries (as opposed to having a full-time cook handle such mundane chores) knows that the cost of basic foods keeps rising, despite the official claims that inflation is essentially near-zero. Common-sense causes include severe weather and droughts than reduce crop yields, rising demand from the increasingly wealthy global middle class and money printing, which devalues the purchasing power of income. While these factors undoubtedly influence the cost of food, it turns out that food moves in virtual lockstep with the one master commodity in an industrialized global economy: oil.

 
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