Yuan

How Abenomics Fails: Japanese Firms Choose Salvaged Computer Parts Over Investment

One of the most interesting examples of Abenomics dismal impact on business sentiment towards capital spending is that major Japanese manufacturers are buying salvaged computer parts from a small business owner instead of spending the money to upgrade. Those who picture Japanese manufacturing production lines as being on the cutting edge of the newest technology have the wrong impression.

Chinageddon - Gold Spikes As USDJPY, Yuan, Bond Yields Plunge

For the first time since March 2014, Gold is back above $1370, spiking higher as China opens. While silver has been celebrating way above Brexit spike highs, gold's initial reaction was far bigger and that spike high has now been taken out. Across Asia things are moving fast. Bond yields in Taiwan are breaking to record lows, JGBs are at fresh record lows with 20Y yields reaching zero for the first time, and USDJPY plunged to a 100 handle again...

"China Is Headed For A 1929-Style Depression"

“The government is allowing speculation by providing cheap financing,” Andy Xie exclaimed, China “is riding a tiger and is terrified of a crash. So it keeps pumping cash into the economy. It is difficult to see how China can avoid a crisis.”

Goldman Reveals How China Is Covering Up Hundreds Of Billions In Capital Outflows

Far from being fixed, China's capital outflow and FX intervention (and resultant reserve depletion) problems are only getting worse by the month. Only now, the PBOC is actively covering them up. Conveniently Goldman has disclosed precisely how the PBOC has covered up as much as $170 billion in FX outflows in the first quarter, more than 100% of the officially reported $123 billion. In other words, instead of $330 billion in Chinese FX outflows since October, the real number is 50% greater, or half a trillion. Here's the math.

Brexit Proved It's All A Central Bank Funded Mirage

Why can’t the markets proceed any higher than when QE ended in Oct/Nov of 2014? You know, if this is truly: a fundamentally based bull market that is. Or, is it that – its fundamentally full of bull? I believe it’s a big-ole-pile of the latter, and little to none of the former. Put a different way: Explain why does it take more central banker intervention, or the promise thereof, to stop these falls? If it were all “fundamentally” based on market principles, again, why is there a need or call for even more monetary interventionism? (i.e., negative interest rates, “helicopter” styled moves, etc., etc.)

Kyle Bass Shares The "Stunning" Thing A Central Banker Once Told Him

"I had a fascinating out of body experience meeting with one of the world's top central bankers in a private meeting about three years ago. it was one of those moments where I...it was one of those epiphanies almost, where it's something you and I knew, but hearing him say it, call it one of the four top central bankers in the world, it was a jarring experience for me..." - Kyle Bass

Futures Stumble As Global Bond Yields Drop To All Time Lows, Precious Metals Spike

Whether it is due to the conclusion of quarter-end window dressing, or due to a more poor manufacturing data out of China overnight, but the new quarter is starting off poorly for risk with Europe flat and US equities lower, while the scramble for safety means that bond yields across the developed world just hit new all time lows as precious metals are surging once again on ongoing speculation central banks will do anything to keep markets propped up and buy up even more assets.

Frontrunning: June 30

  • Brexiters at war as Johnson pulls bid to be PM (FT)
  • Soros Says Brexit Has ‘Unleashed’ a Financial-Markets Crisis (BBG)
  • World stocks poised for worst month since January (Reuters)
  • China to tolerate weaker yuan, wary of trade partners' reaction (Reuters)
  • China central bank criticizes media for publishing 'inaccurate information' on yuan rate (Reuters)

Yuan Tumbles, Stabilizes After Reuters Report China Willing To Weaken Currency To 6.80

The biggest macro event overnight was a report out of Reuters that China's central bank is willing to let the yuan fall to 6.8 per dollar in 2016 to support the economy, which would mean the currency matching last year's record decline of 4.5 percent. The report promptly sent the offshore yuan tumbling, sliding much as 0.72% to 6.7021 per dollar, the lowest since January 11, however it promptly recovered losses following significant PBOC intervention in the open market.

Day 3 Of Global Post-Brexit Rally: European Stocks, US Futures At Session Highs

Day three of the post-Brexit rally continues, and after some initial weakness due to concerns about Chinese currency devaluation, both European stock and US equity futures were trading at session highs, facilitated by yesterday's stress test results which saw dozens of US banks unleash a tsunami of stock buyback announcement which in turn pushed S&P futures to new post-Brexit highs.