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North America Energy Landscape: A Presentation

EconMatters's picture





 

By EconMatters

EconMatters had the pleasure of speaking at the 2012 Ontario Advocis School for the Financial Advisors Association of Canada on August 14, 2012.  

 

In this presentation, we give a high level comprehensive look at the unconventional energy in the U.S. and Canada, the impact from the shale drilling boom, constraints and challenges of the oil industry, and the near term outlook of the oil and gas market.  Hope readers will find the presentation at least interesting as well as informational.


[Note: The near-term price outlook in the presentation reflects only the current market fundamental supply and demand factors, and does not include a scenario of extreme geopolitical or weather events.]   

 

 


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Thu, 08/16/2012 - 04:45 | Link to Comment Laura S.
Laura S.'s picture

From the point of a person who lives in BC and works for the oil company, I can assure you we haven´t come to the peak of all discoveries yet. In the next 100 years, there will be enough oil for the whole planet. Our economy is so heavily dependent on it, that we can´t switch to other resource (Economy in British Columbia).
What should bother us in the near future are the lithium reserves. It will be our computers running our economy, not cars.

Wed, 08/15/2012 - 18:52 | Link to Comment bankruptcylawyer
bankruptcylawyer's picture

old news.

Wed, 08/15/2012 - 18:51 | Link to Comment BeetleBailey
BeetleBailey's picture

Great read. Many Thanks

Wed, 08/15/2012 - 18:24 | Link to Comment disabledvet
disabledvet's picture

Just ignore the weather and geo politics? That's all we've been trading on the past month. If the first Gulf War is any example you want to "buy massively on the rumor and sell even more so on the fact."

Wed, 08/15/2012 - 18:19 | Link to Comment Urban Roman
Urban Roman's picture

 

Frackashackalacka

What could possibly go wrong with that?

Wed, 08/15/2012 - 17:01 | Link to Comment Pubcoceo
Pubcoceo's picture

im not sure I am still buying this peak oil story,

ww.usnews.com/opinion/blogs/on-energy/2011/09/14/abiotic-oil-a-theory-worth-exploring

 

Wed, 08/15/2012 - 19:27 | Link to Comment Seer
Seer's picture

Yeah, and the gravity story... this shit really puts a damper on our desire for perpetual growth!

Wed, 08/15/2012 - 16:49 | Link to Comment SelfGov
SelfGov's picture

BAH 60% by 2040?

US increasing production until 2030?

The "tight" oil production will peak well before that...

Wed, 08/15/2012 - 16:18 | Link to Comment Skateboarder
Skateboarder's picture

Nice presentation, enjoyed the read. Although oil reserves are at their highest at the current, we need to be working on getting natural gas streamlined for planet-wide use NOW. The forecast energy demands for India and China are quite forgiving - these people have just come online in the last decade and they are hungry for power!

Am also quite concerned about the quality of engineering programs today, the competence of engineers to come, and what seems to be a general lack of on-the-job training.

Wed, 08/15/2012 - 17:02 | Link to Comment AnAnonymous
AnAnonymous's picture

Although oil reserves are at their highest at the current,

______________________________

Typical 'Americanism': it is not possible to consider that Earth reserves in oil included the already consumed oil.

Consider this: a place has 100 units of Y.

25 are first discovered and immediately consumed.
35 are later discovered and consumed.
The last 40 are discovered, reserves in Y are at their highest...

Dont imply that reserves were at the highest before any consumption was performed. It is another reality US citizens can not cope with.

Wed, 08/15/2012 - 19:30 | Link to Comment Seer
Seer's picture

Yes, excellent point!  Nothing beats sound math and logic!

NOTE: The US does have a lot more fossil fuel reserves than China does; and, yes, it's a matter of rates of extraction (the US could avoid importation of energy for a while if per-capita consumption was about 1/4 of what it is currently).

Wed, 08/15/2012 - 18:22 | Link to Comment disabledvet
disabledvet's picture

Right up there with the collapse of gasoline consumption I imagine. Even bigger in the EZ from what I hear.

Wed, 08/15/2012 - 16:44 | Link to Comment SwingForce
SwingForce's picture

Check out what this company can do with Natural Gas & BioGas for that matter

http://www.fuelcellenergy.com/

Wed, 08/15/2012 - 16:13 | Link to Comment SwingForce
SwingForce's picture

Thank you very much.

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!