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No More Viagra For Mario Monti And His Ilk

testosteronepit's picture




 

Wolf Richter   www.testosteronepit.com

Economic, regulatory, and entitlement reforms are tough. While they’re supposed to open opportunities, put budgets on sounder footing, or make the economy more competitive, they invariably cut into the flesh of some groups, who then react with demonstrations and strikes to draw attention to their plight and put pressure on the reformers to preserve the status quo.

This has been happening across the Eurozone wherever major reforms have been attempted. People in those demonstrations may speak of revolution—meaning a radical change. But they want the opposite: preserve the existing system, protections, and entitlements. So it’s complicated. Greece is a salient example with impressive TV footage of street battles, Molotov cocktails, and burning buildings. In other countries, France for instance, reforms have been greeted with peaceful demonstrations and more disruptively, with massive transportation strikes that throw innocent bystanders, such as businesses, commuters, and travelers, into utter chaos, sometimes for days.

But now the perhaps most tongue-in-cheek effort will take place in Italy where unelected technocrat Prime Minister Mario Monti and his government are trying to liberalize the economy and create conditions for growth by reforming a whole slew of professions whose insiders are protected by regulatory barriers to entry. Growth is essential. Italy is staggering under its debt. Already, the ECB bought piles of Italian government bonds and printed a mountain of euros that it handed to the banks, including Italian banks, so that they would buy crappy bonds for which the financial markets had lost their appetite. Without those actions, controversial and inflationary as they may be, Italy would have to face the music. It’s tough out there.

"The financial aspect of the crisis is over," declared a relieved Monti last week while visiting Japan, a country mired in a much deeper fiscal hole than Italy but endowed with a central bank that has no compunction about monetizing government deficits. Alas, as he gloated about the progress his government has made in reforming the economy, the targets of his reforms weren't quite so happy.

Among them are state-employed hospital pharmacists, an integral part of Italy's public health care system. They’re upset because the reforms envision issuing 5,000 licenses mostly for new private pharmacies—creating jobs for young unemployed pharmacists who are stewing at their parents’ house while waiting for a miracle. These private pharmacies would then compete with hospital pharmacies. Scared out of their wits by these evil machinations, hospital pharmacists have come up with an ingenious plan: hit back where it hurts the most, and not willy-nilly in every direction, but go after the very top of the power structure, the old men that run the show.

Standard labor actions commence in April and will rise into a crescendo. The old men that run the show should heed the warning; if they don’t water down the reforms, the hospital pharmacists will roll out their ultimate weapon. It will be brutal and life-altering. No more ... Viagra. Hospital pharmacists will cease selling it. Men who habitually use it will be cut off cold turkey and will be cast into abstinence hell. The "Viagra strike” is aimed straight at those responsible for the reforms—the old men in parliament and at Monti himself. The logic is impeccable. And, as Union official Loredana Vasselli points out, it "does not put patients’ health at risk."

Only flaw in the logic: given the early warning, these men could acquire a stash in advance to get them through the strike. Thus, hording could actually cause a spike in pharmacy sales. However, like any Italian man worth his salt, Monti, if pressed by reporters, would deny with casual eloquence that he is hording Viagra....

It’s a heck of a lot better than the astonishing ploy used with impunity across the border. For a debacle that is viewed as amusing by everyone except the bosses, read.... Taking Bosses Hostage: A Labor Negotiating Tactic In France.

 

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Mon, 12/03/2012 - 01:15 | 3028960 GeorgeP
GeorgeP's picture

The people suffering from impotence and erectile dysfunction problem will be pissed by hearing this news. Their last hope of having good love life is to buy generic viagra and consume it for better intercourse.

Mon, 04/02/2012 - 00:43 | 2308879 ricky123
ricky123's picture

Really one of the best information shared with us , it is the best guideline for many peoples all over the world looking to know more about the generic viagra.Thanks for the post.

Generic Viagra

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 21:39 | 2308566 lamont cranston
lamont cranston's picture

So the state-subsidized assholes quit selling Viagra. I've heard of something calleed The Internet, and you can buy all kinds of things there, including ED drugs. And for less $$$. Also, I'd think that any bozo in the Eye-talian Parliament would be able to travel to Suisse & get all the drugs he requires. Junket city. 

 

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 20:59 | 2308438 nathan1234
nathan1234's picture

Monti needs an improvement on the Viagra

Something that not only gives him an erection but also which elongates his dick long enough for him to take it up his own ass.

 

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 15:42 | 2308012 Son of Loki
Son of Loki's picture

"As long as I get my Mega Balilout Bank Bonus, everything will be fine...just fine......" an anonymous banker told the news media Saturday.

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 15:12 | 2307963 Joebloinvestor
Joebloinvestor's picture

Politicians don't need a hard on to fuck ya.

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 13:46 | 2307826 kekekekekekeke
kekekekekekeke's picture

did ZH talk about the Spanish prostitutes http://now.msn.com/money/0328-spanish-prostitutes-on-strike.aspx

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 12:30 | 2307684 Dollar Bill Hiccup
Dollar Bill Hiccup's picture

There once was an Italian King

Who was having a problem with his thing

So he took some Cialis

And througout the palace

Again you could hear the king sing!

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 10:50 | 2307542 ElvisDog
ElvisDog's picture

I have a friend who lives in France. She was paid to get her university degree. She has a guarenteed government job for life. She can even leave that government job (which she has) and it is there for her if she ever wants to return to it. It's a great system, for her, but is it sustainable over the long term?

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 13:47 | 2307827 masterinchancery
masterinchancery's picture

No, completely insane, but she doesn't care.

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 11:16 | 2307570 10044
10044's picture

Ask her if she [knowingly] paid someone else's education? Get my point?

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 10:36 | 2307531 markar
markar's picture

Monti's impotence will end badly

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 07:47 | 2307411 IdioTsincracY
IdioTsincracY's picture

Unfortunately the PIIGS have decided to follow the SQUID model to try to recover from financial disaster.

We all know how it will end: Argentina, anybody?!?

It is unfortunate that the real success story (ICELAND) is kept away from the public both by the kleptocracy and the MSM.

In short, the only solution is: f@ck the bankers (and definitely do not put them in charge of your government!!!)

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 07:18 | 2307405 DavidC
DavidC's picture

It's 'hoarding', not 'hording'.

DavidC

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 14:34 | 2307891 Kali
Kali's picture

"whoring", fixed it for ya.  : )

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 05:30 | 2307354 Ghordius
Ghordius's picture

"unelected technocrat Prime Minister Mario Monti"

again this meme: Italy's constitution has it's centerpiece in the elected Parliament. This representative body does, as usual in parliamentary systems, confirm a government appointed by the President of the Republic (who is also appointed by Parliament).

So PM Monti is heading a cabinet of ministers that was appointed by President Napolitano and confirmed by Parliament - as per frigging Italian Constitution.

Since it involves a very broad majority - something that can happen because Italy's electoral system allowes lots of parties, it is called a "technical" government (vs. a "normal" "political" government based on a 50+% straight elected majority).

The current majority in Parliament holding up the government has also the power of crashing it and appointing/confirming a new one.

so by using this "elected technocrat" meme you either show you don't know enough about it or you are trying to make a cheap shot aimed at the psyche of people not knowing enough. Cheap. Shot.

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 08:00 | 2307417 AnAnonymous
AnAnonymous's picture

Doubtless that US citizen governments do anything illegal.

US citizenism is built around the rule of law. As a result, stuff done by governments has to be legal, no matter the substance.

US citizen actions are never clear cut, they have to be controversial at best.

When a US citizen government does something, it makes that something legal.

That is nothing like illegality for a government structure in US citizenism.

US citizen governments in Europe even overrode referenda through parliament decisions.

See France and the Netherlands.

Quite funny when one thinks of the government of the governed.

But hey, if overriding the result of a referendum was tyranny, US citizens living in Europe would have risen up to quash the government.

For suppressing tyranny and spreading freedom is what US citizens do.

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 10:07 | 2307511 TheFourthStooge-ing
TheFourthStooge-ing's picture

AnAnonymous said:

US citizenism is built around the rule of law. As a result, stuff done by governments has to be legal, no matter the substance.

Nice. Wooo, so relieving.

Entertain me.

US citizen actions are never clear cut, they have to be controversial at best.

When a US citizen government does something, it makes that something legal.

That is nothing like illegality for a government structure in US citizenism.

Awesome recipe. Ah, if people of ancient times had known that, today's will be different...

US citizen governments in Europe even overrode referenda through parliament decisions.

Made me laugh to almost out of chair falling. Take away fake referenda and theater of parliament, what remains? Chinese citizenism governments in Europe. Can Chinese citizenism citizens call it something else than success?

See France and the Netherlands.

See Formosa and Mongolia.

Quite funny when one thinks of the government of the governed.

Quite funny when one thinks of PR of C as being republic of the people, as if it is being republic of the governed. Quite a comedy being wrapped up in a package and sold in the polluted air of the open markets downthere. Too bad for those buyers unwrapping when they find unexpected reality inside. Their comedy is for package sellers to do laughing at the buyers.

Do you have a way to beat that?

But hey, if overriding the result of a referendum was tyranny, US citizens living in Europe would have risen up to quash the government.

More angle taking of Chinese citizenism propaganda. Fake referendum and parliament theater are one of their tricks is to get you to convince them of anything.

No matter the angle they choose, it won't change the expectations and the demands Chinese citizenism citizens have on the geographical space Europeans occupy. Chinese citizenism blobbing up is pan-continental.

For suppressing tyranny and spreading freedom is what US citizens do.

More blame shifting to exterior, more offuscation, more Chinese citizenism sarcasticality. As if repeation makes true story out of false facts.

Ah,when a Chinese citizenism citizen is forced to admit one's own nature, it usually smells bad.

 

Mon, 04/02/2012 - 02:29 | 2308979 AnAnonymous
AnAnonymous's picture

Ah,when a Chinese citizenism citizen is forced to admit one's own nature, it usually smells bad.

_____________________________________________

Indeed a US citizen question.

It is all based on:
-one has to be a Chinese to speak about US citizenism (camping)
-the existence of chinese citizenism
-the acceptance of various fantasies like the dismissal that China is integrated in the US world order, with such consequences like exportation of polluting activities from the free world
What is next? That African countries that have been forced to accept toxic and radioactive waste by US citizen countries are riddled with african citizenism?

Etc...

A fine specimen of US citizen. When one deals with that kind, one knows one deals in reality.

Mon, 04/02/2012 - 08:33 | 2309203 TheFourthStooge-ing
TheFourthStooge-ing's picture

.

Indeed a US citizen question.

It is all based on:
-one has to be a Chinese to speak about US citizenism (camping)

Cleverness in misleadment and rewriting history, such is a defining trait of Chinese citizenism. What you call US citizenism camping has existed for many, many of centuries before 1776,July,4th and you blame it still, like the sinking of Easter Island, on prehistoric US citizenism. Your words are stretching even now the boundaries of incredible.

-the existence of chinese citizenism

Chinese citizenism, as already having been shown to exist, is now without question a pan-continental phenomenum.

-the acceptance of various fantasies like the dismissal that China is integrated in the US world order, with such consequences like exportation of polluting activities from the free world

China is not fully integrated in US world order. China is now slowly withdrawing support for US world order. China freely choosing to be heavy in polluting in order to get significant blobbing up, now turns its eyes to exterior for greater blob up.

What is next? That African countries that have been forced to accept toxic and radioactive waste by US citizen countries are riddled with african citizenism?

What is next? Made me laugh. Next is more Chinese citizenism blobbing up into Africa, exporting pollution and gobbling resources with gluttony. Only difference now is blobbing up with a friendly smile in Africa instead of PR of C rifle barrel like Tibet, Mongolia, Nepal. Etc.

 

Mon, 04/02/2012 - 02:35 | 2308982 Vic Vinegar
Vic Vinegar's picture

Ah, when you comment Old Dirty Bastard comes out.

_____________________________________________________

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tC5gIBdfIQI&ob=av2n

You had a point?

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 05:54 | 2307362 bank guy in Brussels
bank guy in Brussels's picture

You make an accurate technical point that the appointment of the government was, on paper, 'legal' ...

Though the 'unelected government' meme is really shorthand for a longer and more subtle, but important argument.

After Berlusconi fell from office - or Papandreou in Greece - both countries should have had elections. That would have been the true spirit of Parliamentary democracy.

Yet the politicians of both countries essentially railroaded through some EU-approved appointees - yes, 'legally' - in violation of the spirit, though not perhaps the technical legal letter, of their electoral laws.

It is as if the foreign-EU elements have the parliamentarians generally bribed, to act against their own people. The famous statement of, I believe it was EU President van Rompuy, that Italians 'don't need elections'.

As the great American, the Rev Dr Martin Luther King pointed out, everything Hitler did was 'legal', too.

Mon, 04/02/2012 - 03:19 | 2309000 Ghordius
Ghordius's picture

you are right in one point: in the general spirit of democracy, "if in doubt, have new elections"

the Italian Constitution "fixes" this "if in doubt" situation by stating that if parliament, after a motion of distrust against the government is undecided - finds a majority against the current government but not for a new one - then the President has the reserve power and duty of dissolving parliament and fix new elections.

this is not the case, the elected parliament has found a super-majority behind this "national unity in front of danger" government. you'd call it bipartisan. as much as it irks me, parliament is behaving as envisioned by the constitution - and implementing reforms all parties had in their drawers but did not have the political will to do - from all drawers, all the painful ones.

Dr. King, btw, did not add that what Hitler and his goons did was legal - after they did the unconstitutional part, though I'm quite sure he understood that he was making a statement that was meant to make people think about the differences.

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 03:52 | 2307321 hooligan2009
hooligan2009's picture

italians are like all other countries, viagra and cialis sellers use the internet. who here doesn't get swamped with ads for erection pills and oxycontin? (not sure why the two go tegether!) the italian pharmcists are going to be the ones with withdrawal as they lose out on their protected monoply for a happy pill.

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 00:30 | 2307253 pashley1411
pashley1411's picture

Hobbes had it right, the natural condition of people is nasty, brutish, and short.

For a time, aided by American frontier, the US escaped the natural entropy of the human condition and its parasites which arise whenever any surplus is accumulated.  Who cover their actions with a figleaf of humanitarianism and charity.

We'll, the leeches have caught up, and there is no more frontier.     

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 07:54 | 2307414 AnAnonymous
AnAnonymous's picture

For a time, aided by American frontier, the US escaped the natural entropy of the human condition and its parasites which arise whenever any surplus is accumulated. Who cover their actions with a figleaf of humanitarianism and charity.

____________________________________________________
Ah, human nature.

Sure, sure. Because the Indians did not escape the natural entropy of the US citizen eternal nature and its parasites.

Too many US citizens, not enough Indians.

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 09:11 | 2307464 TheFourthStooge-ing
TheFourthStooge-ing's picture

AnAnonymous said:

Ah, human nature.

Ah, Chinese citizenism nature. Here we go again.

Sure, sure. Because the Indians did not escape the natural entropy of the US citizen eternal nature and its parasites.

Made me laugh. Very can kicking. In Chinese citizenism, victimology is very high. Only references to an exterior, to fantasy. Inward looking to the interior requires to gaze upon the truth of Chinese citizenism. Impossible to tackle reality as it is.

Kicking the can is national Chinese citizenism sports but still...

Too many US citizens, not enough Indians.

Once again, cheap offuscation. Too many Chinese citizenism citizens, not enough Mongolians. But hey, Chinese citizenism citizens, everything to avoid self indiction, which is why your Wikipedia page on US citizenism is not in an English language version:

http://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/US_citizenism

When exposed to truth, Chinese citizenism ignores. Denial is a big thing is Chinese citizenism. You will know when you have exposed truth to Chinese citizenism citizens. They will run from it, never acknowledging. Deny, deny, deny. This is the primary element of the eternal nature of Chinese citizenism.

 

Mon, 04/02/2012 - 02:33 | 2308980 AnAnonymous
AnAnonymous's picture

http://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/US_citizenism

________________________________________________

That was a good laughter.

Will have to investigate that story.

Woooo, some US citizens are really getting involved in that stuff.

At this point, I would not even exclude a front to sustain their claims.

Mon, 04/02/2012 - 08:07 | 2309169 TheFourthStooge-ing
TheFourthStooge-ing's picture

.

http://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/US_citizenism

________________________________________________

That was a good laughter.

A good laughter even one better is your pretending to be not the author of the US citizenism wikipedia.

Will have to investigate that story.

Please keep us updated with the unearthing latest results from your investigation.

Such a story will bear with it great importance of humanity.

Woooo, some US citizens are really getting involved in that stuff.

At this point, I would not even exclude a front to sustain their claims.

Are you now claiming being acting in concert with US citizenism interests?

Clever subterfuge, quite clever subterfuge...

 

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 00:29 | 2307250 q99x2
q99x2's picture

Sustainability in the face of bankster induced austerity.

Difficult to write a G rated comment to this one.

Sat, 03/31/2012 - 23:32 | 2307177 Element
Element's picture

Austerity reduces Govt size.

Reduced Govt size lowers Govt spending, reduces deficits, creates sustainable budget to revenue, and attrites the growth of public debt.

Unless bailouts are used to dramatically increase public debt, which then brings all the painful efforts of austerity completely undone -- anyway!

Which means, austerity, in the absence of public debt writedown and nullification of public obligations, is a pointless and enervating absurdity that will inevitably result in persistent civil uprising that may degenerate into armed conflict against the extorters.

But if austerity were done in parallel hardline bankruptcy of defunct banks and elimination of unrepayable obligations, it thus reduces the propensity for the cream of incomes, that we need to merely 'have a life', for the little-people, which more and more disappears and is almost entirely wasted and frittered-away on taxation for non-essential parasitic uses -- could then be progressively reversed, generating economic recovery.

But now that we have been brainwashed to allow the cream of our income to be sucked away into a failed centralised control, minus orderly bankruptcies of failed banks, we will have to restructure anyway but in a disorderly and destructive way.

Austerity is just one part of it, but unfortunately, it is not leading to restructuring at all, so all the pain is for naught. 

Indeed, we have a misallocation, a sort of pseudo-austerity policy model, where 'austerity', instead of being a catalyst for eliminating bad debts and bad banks, is used as a prop from sustaining unrepayable public debt to failed banks, in conjunction with these absurd alleged Sovereign (PRIVATE BANKSTER) 'bailouts'.

So 'austerity' and the resulting civil pain that is emerging and finding its voice is being cynically used by politicians as a prop for a totally failed and profoundly corrupt and criminal banking system, that has zero remorse for its predation, and wants another round of bonuses, thankyou.

Mass uprisings and wars are certain to erupt from this.

The neo-police-state nation-state has zip to do with maintaining national-security of it's people.

The States and the central banks are an extortion monopoly.

The police-state was not erected for maintaining the physical security of tax payers, nor any naive myth about "the rule of law".

This is just plain old-fashioned extortion.

But on a grandiose globalised scale.

The-powers-that-be clearly don't want economic recovery, but they do want a preponderous militarised police-state Govt who sees the suffering population as "the problem".

 

Which reveals the lie of the current 'austerity' policy sham, with respect to my initial sentence.

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 08:17 | 2307435 Sean7k
Sean7k's picture

You're anger is well justified. Now, try starting from scratch and not use the templates provided by government and bankers. Every condition you described is part of the process that creates antagonisms for the benefit of the Elite.

Ultimately, it leads one to attempt to modify one of the processes for the solution. Unfortunately, the solution must lie OUTSIDE the system. Therefore no distribution system for taxers will ever be fair, because taxes are the problem. No government will be fair, because government is just a tool of coercion. 

As long as a monopoly on the creation of money exists, people will be fleeced and sheared and occasionally murdered. This monopoly is only available through government. It is always presided over by bankers (since the bank of england). 

There is no solution to the human being. There are merely means that minimize his depredations. All these means work best when there is zero control nor regulation (laws are especially problematic). 

We associate civilization with law, but that is only what we are taught from day one. We never distinguish between contracts and the infinite expression of totalitarianism through regulation and decree. Civilization can exist just fine with the voluntary exchange of contracts and the elimination of legal tender laws.

 

 

 

Mon, 04/02/2012 - 07:26 | 2309068 Element
Element's picture

I don't disagree per-sec Sean, and I'm well familiar with the views of rogues like Stefan Molyneux, etc.

http://www.freedomainradio.com/Home.aspx
http://www.freedomainradio.com/FreeBooks.aspx

But don't ya think it would be nice to have at least one working modern example, a proof-of-concept test, before we jumped in boots-and-all?

Just say, for instance, it didn't work?

My own suspicion of such a situation is that small Govt, to very-small Govt, is the idea your US founding-fathers structured into the USSA's now defunct Constitution.

i.e. they didn't seem to think that no Govt ... was a viable proposition.

And I'm fairly far from convinced that zero Govt is viable or going to be a better situation.

But I'm also pretty far from ruling it out too.

I feel that way simply because I can't see much that any Govt does, or has done, that I'm in favor of, or believe could not be done far better, and much more efficiently, if indeed such things needed to be done at all (and mostly what they do is irrelevant bullshit and creating of mass-delusions anyway).

But I like paved roads, a workable energy supply, fresh food, a clean secure bed, showers, potable running water, and clean clothing, and professional medicine.

Hence I necessarily like a structured framework that provides these reliably, and this is at its core, the process of the nation-state and of local Govts ... at least, for now.

They have a track record of providing these in my lifetime, in which I literally went from shitting into a smelly hole in a backyard out-house, to indoor toilets that smell completely nothing like decaying shit plus stale piss with roiling maggots and the sound of flies plus the rotting saw-dust we threw on top to try and keep such factors in check and bearable. 

(not that I'm insinuating that GOVT supplied all this, as it is a mixture of public and private actions)

This over time leaves an impression on one. 

Fair enough? 

So one must ask; what is the good of an idealism or 'new-way' if the application is worse, or a step backwards, in our daily life?

So I have considerable suspicions and perceive a giant gulf exists between nice and hearty libertarian theoretical idealisms, and my daily structural practicalities, and the provisions of an agreeable way of life.

 

What say you?

(or anyone else who cares to chime-in)

Mon, 04/02/2012 - 08:13 | 2309142 i-dog
i-dog's picture

 

"rogues like Stefan Molyneux"

Please explain?

"at least one working modern example, a proof-of-concept test"

Two immediately come to mind:

1. eBay: An international market with alternative "currencies" (paypal, cc, cod, etc) and no court of jurisdiction ... just individual contracts and a user-rating system---with recourse to a pre-agreed arbitrator---to weed out unscrupulous participants very quickly.

2. TPTB: All of their multi-trillion dollar international dealings in arms, drugs, bribery, corruption, illegal immigration and prostitution are conducted under individual contracts with no court of jurisdiction ... again with recourse to an agreed arbitrator and a peer-review system to maintain "honour" in their transactions.

I think you will find that, in both cases, disputes are settled by appropriate compensation rather than recourse to random violence and mayhem.

In neither case is government involved or necessary.

Is it any surprise that what works for TPTB is frowned upon for the performing seals?

At the local services level, Hong Kong is a great example of efficient and inexpensive services provided by competing private companies for everything from gas, electricity, transport and telecommunications to hospitals and clinics for medical care of both [very] rich and [very] poor.

There is no "service" provided by government that could not be more efficiently provided at lower cost and higher service levels by competition between entrepreneurs in the private sector. Indeed, I cannot think of one government anywhere that hasn't used its monopoly powers to enrich either or both of its members and their 'friends'.

It's time for a new paradign. The old one's fucked (staying with the Viagra theme ;).

Mon, 04/02/2012 - 08:44 | 2309224 Element
Element's picture

 

 

"rogues like Stefan Molyneux"

 

An avid anarchical thinker, who actively seeks to pull the rug out from under the entire Governance paradigm, via robbing it of any shred of intellectual shelter, and lampooning the bland and unnecessary unquestioning acceptance of that failed paradigm.

Rogue, heretic, apostate from the true path of being governed, an irredeemable smarmy reprobate who turns the young against TPTB.

Socratic ... a rogue ... recant or drink the hemlock, etc.

I'll consider your examples. I find them unconvincing, but not without credence -- need to sleep though.

Mon, 04/02/2012 - 21:46 | 2311577 i-dog
i-dog's picture
  • "who actively seeks to pull the rug out from under the entire Governance paradigm"
  • "robbing it of any shred of intellectual shelter"
  • "lampooning the bland and unnecessary unquestioning acceptance of that failed paradigm"
  • "apostate from the true path of being governed"
  • "turns the young against TPTB"

OK, those are his good points. Now, do you have any negative ones to justify the opprobrious sobriquet "rogue"?

Tue, 04/03/2012 - 04:22 | 2312229 Element
Element's picture

WTF?  ... it must be an American thing, to immediately assume that calling anyone a rogue is a negative, rather than just a plain-speaking, frank and factual observation.

To the mainstream point of view, his views are those of a rogue.

And so are i-dog's.

So are Element's.

Tyler's rogue too.

 

BTW:  "opprobrious sobriquet"  ... eh? ... I'll file that under, "discursive ostentatious prolixities"

Sat, 03/31/2012 - 23:12 | 2307173 non_anon
non_anon's picture

Question: How is it that a country allowed a bankster to take over?

Subliminal: Has the U.S. been captured by banksters since 1913?

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 08:24 | 2307438 Sean7k
Sean7k's picture

Everybody has a price. The US has always been captured by bankers. The first National Bank was created at the birth of the country under the Articles for Confederation. The founders were merchantilists. 

There was a change of some names to property and then the Rothschilds, through their agents, attempted to regain control of this asset we call America. The FED is just the latest incarnation and has successfully made the USA an English colony once again. 

Apparently, for punishment from the first time, we serve as their cannon fodder and have so since WWI. 

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 02:24 | 2307300 WAMO556
WAMO556's picture

Why yes. Yes they have!

Sat, 03/31/2012 - 21:41 | 2307094 slewie the pi rat
slewie the pi rat's picture

Among them are state-employed hospital pharmacists, an integral part of Italy's public health care system. They’re upset because the reforms envision issuing 5,000 licenses mostly for new private pharmacies—creating jobs for young unemployed pharmacists who are stewing at their parents’ house while waiting for a miracle.

 

So austerity puts the protected class in its place while the young turks move in, albeit at wages that will keep the banksters happy.  FoxCONN / ci uccideremo

Sun, 04/01/2012 - 02:25 | 2307302 WAMO556
WAMO556's picture

Welcome the new boss(s); same as the old boss(s)!

Sat, 03/31/2012 - 22:47 | 2307148 ebworthen
ebworthen's picture

Exactly, you saved me some typing slewie.  +1

What better for the Kleptoligarchy than to have a perpetual see-saw societal war over generations where the only losers are individual citizens being thankful for their potatoes and leather shoe stew.

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