Money and Markets Infographic Shows Silver Most Undervalued Asset

GoldCore's picture

Money and Markets Infographic Shows Silver Most Undervalued Asset

- Silver remains severely under owned and under valued asset
- Entire silver market worth tiny $100 billion shown in one tiny square
- "All of the World’s Money and Markets in One Visualization"

- Must see 'Money and Markets' infographic shows relative size of key markets: silver bullion, gold bullion, cryptocurrencies/ bitcoin, largest companies, 50 richest people, Fed balance sheet, currency, stocks, property, cash, debt & derivatives
- Small allocation by investors and world's richest will see silver surge like bitcoin

 

Click to enlarge. Source: Visual Capitalist

by Visual Capitalist

Millions, billions, and trillions…

When we talk about the giant size of Apple, the fortune of Warren Buffett, or the massive amount of global debt accumulated – all of these things sound large, but they are actually extremely different in magnitude.

That’s why visualizing things spatially can give us a better perspective on money and markets.

HOW MUCH MONEY EXISTS?

This infographic was initially created to show how much money exists in its different forms. For example, to highlight how much physical cash there is in comparison to broader measures of money which include saving and checking account deposits.

Interestingly, what is considered “money” depends on who you are asking.

Are the abstractions created by Central Banks really money? What about gold, bitcoins, or other hard assets?

A NEW MEANING

However, since we first released this infographic in 2015, “All the World’s Money and Markets” has taken on a different meaning to us and many others. It’s a way of simplifying a complex universe of currencies, assets, and other financial instruments in a way that people can understand.

Numbers represented in the data visualization range from the size of the above-ground silver market ($17 billion) to the notional value of all derivatives ($1.2 quadrillion as a high-end estimate). In between those two extremes, we’ve added many other familiar measures, such as the GDP of California, the value of equities, the real estate market, along with different money supply metrics to give perspective.

The end result? A visually pleasing, but enlightening new way to understand the vast universe of global assets.

All of the World’s Money and Markets in One Visualization via Visual Capitalist


Related Content

Silver Very Undervalued from Historical Perpective of Ancient Greece

Silver Production Has “Huge Decline” In 2nd Largest Producer Peru

Silver Bullion Prices Set to Soar

 

News and Commentary

Gold holds near one-month peak despite firmer dollar (Reuters.com)

Euro Drops as German Talks Fail; Asian Stocks Slip (Bloomberg.com)

Fed readiness to raise rates next month and a wariness about next recession (MarketWatch.com)

Bitcoin Soars Past $8,000 as Technology Shift Concern Vanishes (Bloomberg.com)

Gold smugglers now prefer Europe over Gulf countries: Customs (IndiaTimes.com)


Source: Bloomberg

Prepare to bet against bitcoin as it becomes civilised - Tett (FT.com)

Gold Price Suppression - Zero Hedge invites Financial Times to heed GATA (ZeroHedge.com)

Gold Versus Bitcoin: The Pro-Gold Argument Takes Shape (GoldSeek.com)

Upsurge in big earthquakes predicted for 2018 as Earth rotation slows (ZeroHedge.com)

Arab League Holds Emergency Session: Iran And "Terrorist" Hezbollah Must Be Stopped (ZeroHedge.com)

Gold Prices (LBMA AM)

20 Nov: USD 1,292.35, GBP 974.82 & EUR 1,096.43 per ounce
17 Nov: USD 1,283.85, GBP 969.31 & EUR 1,088.19 per ounce
16 Nov: USD 1,277.70, GBP 969.01 & EUR 1,085.53 per ounce
15 Nov: USD 1,285.70, GBP 976.62 & EUR 1,086.29 per ounce
14 Nov: USD 1,273.70, GBP 972.47 & EUR 1,086.59 per ounce
13 Nov: USD 1,278.40, GBP 977.59 & EUR 1,097.89 per ounce
10 Nov: USD 1,284.45, GBP 976.44 & EUR 1,102.19 per ounce

Silver Prices (LBMA)

20 Nov: USD 17.15, GBP 12.94 & EUR 14.56 per ounce
17 Nov: USD 17.09, GBP 12.95 & EUR 14.49 per ounce
16 Nov: USD 17.04, GBP 12.92 & EUR 14.48 per ounce
15 Nov: USD 17.12, GBP 13.00 & EUR 14.45 per ounce
14 Nov: USD 16.94, GBP 12.92 & EUR 14.45 per ounce
13 Nov: USD 16.93, GBP 12.93 & EUR 14.53 per ounce
10 Nov: USD 17.00, GBP 12.92 & EUR 14.60 per ounce


Recent Market Updates

- Is New Fed Chief A “Swamp Critter Extraordinaire”?
- Deepening Crisis In Hyper-inflationary Venezuela and Zimbabwe
- UK Debt Crisis Is Here – Consumer Spending, Employment and Sterling Fall While Inflation Takes Off
- Protect Your Savings With Gold: ECB Propose End To Deposit Protection
- Internet Shutdowns Show Physical Gold Is Ultimate Protection
- Gold Coins and Bars Saw Demand Rise 17% to 222T in Q3
- Prepare For Interest Rate Rises And Global Debt Bubble Collapse
- Platinum Bullion ‘May Be One Of The Only Cheap Assets Out There’
- World’s Largest Gold Producer China Sees Production Fall 10%
- German Investors Now World’s Largest Gold Buyers
- Gold Price Reacts as Central Banks Start Major Change
- Why Switzerland Could Save the World and Protect Your Gold
- Invest In Gold To Defend Against Bail-ins

Important Guides

For your perusal, below are our most popular guides in 2017:

Essential Guide To Storing Gold In Switzerland

Essential Guide To Storing Gold In Singapore

Essential Guide to Tax Free Gold Sovereigns (UK)

Please share our research with family, friends and colleagues who you think would benefit from being informed by it.

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Vilfredo Pareto's picture

I really don't want to buy in to silver unless it hits 12 again.   This of course means the next target is $20 and we won't see 12 in my lifetime.  I am the perfect contrary indicator.  You all can make money doing the opposite of what I do.

Scrot's picture

I accumulated several thousand ounces over the last few years and basically it just goes nowhere. Had I put the same money in Bitcoin--which was in the low hundreds the first time I took notice of it--I would have some real money by now. 

Turin Turambar's picture

Been there, done that... sadly.  That's changing now though.  It's still not too late imo.

Aegeas Du'Augloth's picture

This infograph absolutely sucks ! Little cubes ? How lazy can you be ?

Bring back the infographs of comparison sized cubes next to houses, planes, football fields and the statue of liberty. Those are the impressive visuals. 

What a complete fail.

 

 

 

mily's picture

"The asset we're selling is the most undervalued" is it just me fed up with bullion dealer articles?

Publius1688's picture

Glad I'm not the only person who feels this way. If silver is that undervalued and is poised for a sharp spike, why the hell are you selling it? Altruism?

Silver Savior's picture

I always love silver articles because silver is the thing that's going to get one over on these bastards in finance. 

Cast Iron Skillet's picture

yes, yes, yes. undervalued. real soon now, it's going to shoot up to $1000 because that's what it's really worth. really.

Silver Savior's picture

I know I won't sell any silver unless it hits at least $1200. Even then I might not want the paper money. I will have to see what kinds of goods and services it can buy at the time. And if I do sell at that level I am going to did out the ugly rounds first. 

Those eagles and such are probably worth $5000 each. 

Cast Iron Skillet's picture

I'm not selling my silver either. But I've been listening to "silver is undervalued" now for about 5 years, and I'm getting a little tired of it ...

Fireman's picture

Wanna buy some, bubbles, Bub?

 

Blipcoin bubble$ fresh from the lectric tulip farm to soothe the savage beast.

http://www.bitlisten.com/

Silver Savior's picture

For one Bitcoin you could buy like 4 used cars. I would say it's gone too high too fast. Or do this take 3 one ounce gold coins say St. Gaudens double eagles. And 200 Silver eagles put all that on the table. All of that is roughly worth one Bitcoin. No thanks keep the Bitcoin I want all that metal. 

King of Ruperts Land's picture

How much was it the first time you bitched about it?

everything1's picture

Lithium is undervalued and will be the metal investment of the future. Silver and gold are relics now, they were always hoarded.  Both silver and gold are great conductors and silver moves heat best, and has antibacterial properties,  We see the silver spray buttons on our rear car windshields and even on some side windows, it's more viewable with UV sunglasses on, but nobody cares about bacteria or energy it's abundant.  Also, we are in a copper revolution, most silver comes with copper mining, we are now passed two years above ground supply of silver (known silver).  Silver and gold are just hedges now, and price adjusted according to interest rate levels as well as future inflation expectations.  Asians love the gold because they have pretty bad inflation.  China .. government, they don't just want gold, they want all of the gold so they are buying mines now. 

silverserfer's picture

there wil always be an immense amount of lithium available to be mined from sea water. forever. also its not a metal that can be stored by your everyday person. too tricky.

Yellow_Snow's picture

What are they peddling? 

Oh, sorry, I missed the silver coins at the bottom...

Tyler's, I hope Zero Hedge is making money on these GoldSores Ads...

HoPewGassed's picture

Hmm, an advertisement on ZH masquerading as an article.  Odd. 

King of Ruperts Land's picture

WTF? Where is gold in the infographic? I call foul.

beyondtheprogramming's picture

Dont follow the money. Follow the people who create and manipulate the value of things.

Dragon HAwk's picture

Nothing like a Peace or Morgan Dollar to show people what the government does to your Money.

Memedada's picture

The government? The government is by all practical measures privately owned by the same actors who own the monetary system. The FED is privately owned. The FIAT-system is designed to enrich the capitalists/the private owners of the system. The government – if under democratic control – is not the problem, the private control of the government is. Or in other words: the fascistic nature of the government is the problem = that the government has been turned into a servant of capital is the problem.

Pearson365's picture

The real purpose is to have hard working debt slaves.  I'd like a few slaves too please.

TeamDepends's picture

You are correct until you start babbling about "capitalists".  A capitalist believes in free-market capitalism and competition.  The private owners of the system despise these concepts.  Their New World Order is nothing but neo-feudalism.  Communism and fascism are the two sides of the same totalitarian coin they use to enslave the masses.  Free-market capitalism and Constitutional Republics are their worst enemies because in these systems common men can, through their own will and effort, rise up to challenge the globalist (communist) overlords.  "Competition is a sin"- John D. Rockefeller.

Memedada's picture

Markets are not defining of capitalism (only for the indoctrinated fake [fake as created as a propaganda-trick in the 70’s] US-libertarians).

“But capitalism is not the only economic system which relies on markets. Pre-capitalist economies also had markets-where producers could sell excess supplies of agricultural goods or handicrafts, and where exotic commodities (like spices or fabrics) from far-off lands could be purchased. Most forms of socialism also rely heavily on markets to distribute end products and even, in some cases, to organize investment and production. So markets are not unique to capitalism, and there is nothing inherently capitalist about a market.”

 - Stanford, Jim - Economics for Everyone: A Short Guide to the Economics of Capitalism. Ann Arbor: MI., Pluto Press. 2008. p. 36.

And I’ll just mention one – due to lack of time to counter decades of corporate propaganda (i.e. the content of your mind) – of the big/defining differences between a communist dictatorship and a fascist one: the ownership of the means of production. In communism the means of production is owned by the state (or the party), in fascism the means of production is (like the state itself) owned by capitalists/private ownership. During Hitler’s (and Mussolini’s and Franco’s) reign of power the private owned part of the economy grew (http://www.ub.edu/graap/nazi.pdf).

PS. I am not a communist, but a true libertarian (i.e. against  all forms of illegitimate power public or private – today all power is private or controlled by private interests/capitalists).

 

bobsmith5's picture

True capitalism is free enterprise and is the outcome of a free society. What we have today is not capitalism at all but a corporate fascist crony capitalism. An oligarchy if you will. The truth is those with the most wealthy have always ruled in the form of a monarchy, fascism, communism, or just plane old dictatorship. The fascist capitalist have historically financed every form of communism and socialism, because without them they cannot exist on their own.

It's a corporatist fascist world because there is not one nation on the earth which does not have a central bank or which is not incorporated, and under maritime law, save perhaps two or three.

silverserfer's picture

without moraility and modernized laws, capatalism in todays age is gravitating towards a singularity. Businesses do not try to  co-exist, they either eat each other(buy out corporate take over) or perrish. the internet is reaking havoc on old school capatalist theory. 

TeamDepends's picture

YOU are the smug little bitch who is the victim of leftist brainwashing, not us.  In free-market capitalism, there is NO COERCION.  Thus, a capitalist CAN NOT be a fascist.  Today all power is private or controlled by private interests, who are COMMUNIST/NEO-FEUDALIST TOTALITARIANS.

ShorTed's picture

Never argue with an idiot (he lists himself as a left-wing libertarian...if that doesn't tell you all you need to know about him), they'll bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.

Bring the Gold's picture

That's just plain false. Economics is ultimately disguised force. Why? Because it's enforced with force. See my comment above. If you think private militaries, police and mercenaries can't deny liberty or coerce people you have zero grasp of history and will see unfold a system where it is all privatized and be puzzled by your lack of Liberty and day to day coercion. It's absurd to say private mercenaries can't coerce people. Absurd and patently false.

anarchitect's picture

Yes, coercion can arise you describe.  But it's nothing compared to the hundreds of millions that were killed by government since 1914.  Private actors could never achieve monopolies on coercion that span the size of most nation states.  No one can promise utopia, but we'd be much better off if these states disappeared or at least had their revenues cut by 90%.

Not My Real Name's picture

Your laser-like focus on corporate power, propaganda and private interests, while ignoring the obvious threat levied by our militarized police (government), NSA (government), CIA (government) and our globe-covering military (government), sure makes you sound like an apologist for ... our government overlords.

Rail all you want about "corporate power", but only the government can take away your liberty. Every libertarian worth his salt understands that.

Bring the Gold's picture

I'm with you concerns about government. However, he is correct that government is clearly DIRECTED by private parties. Further, it's an outright lie to say private interests can't take away liberty. Coca cola's use of armed mercenaries to kill and harass union organizers in South America, the Pinkerton's, Blackwater/Xe, mercenaries historically and United Fruit to name a handful put the lie to that. It's absurd to blame solely private or solely public means of oppression. The issue is oppression and freedom. If Jeff bezos owns the entire earth and raises prices on food and water to astronomical sums and has a private military and police to enforce it, you can't argue with any real integrity that this doesn't constitute a loss of liberty, freedom and otherwise total domination of people and thenremoval of choice. Unless you think dying of hunger and thirst doesn't represent the ultimate loss of liberty. Please guys, stop being ideologues. The stakes are way too high.

Memedada's picture

“The world’s richest men”? That list does not include small fishes like Gates, Zuckerberg, Buffett etc. The real ownership class (the old money that controls the system itself – i.e. that controls the banking sector/monetary system and that therefore controls the fiat that the smaller fishes uses to calculate their ill-gotten gains) is never mentioned. The old royal families, banking families and the winning capitalists of the first round of monopoly are all hiding in the dark and pulling all the strings.

MrBoompi's picture

I agree the world's 50 richest people are not accurately depicted on this graphic.  The truly wealthy do not allow their holdings to become public knowledge.  And GDP is certainly not wealth, or value.  But I do agree the market for silver is small.  Ieven agree silver is undervalued.  But that doesn't mean it's necessaily a good investment at this time.  The price is still heavily manipulated.  When TPTB decide to take the foot off the brakes, let me know.  

bobsmith5's picture

The price of everything is manipulated. If it is of significance, it is manipulated, suppressed, and controlled. Crypto's for now being the only exception.

Memedada's picture

But yes, do buy PHYSICAL silver and gold bullion. A finger to the FIAT-paradigm!

Silver Savior's picture

I give them the bird quite regularly. Their paper money sucks.

Pearson365's picture

Where's you cousin, Alotovcrap?  I miss him.