This page has been archived and commenting is disabled.

Tyler Durden's picture

Greece Set To Default On Foreign-Law Bonds On May 15





Back in January, when we wrote "Subordination 101: A Walk Thru For Sovereign Bond Markets In A Post-Greek Default World", we said that "because while the bulk of the bonds, or what is now becoming obvious is the junior class, can be impaired with impunity (pardon the pun), it is the UK-law, or the non-domestic indenture, bonds, which are the de facto fulcrum security."  In other words, from the very beginning the ball game was all about the non-Greek law bonds, whose indentures make it impossible for a non-makewhole take out settlement. Alas, we underestimated the stupidity of the European authorities who in their pursuit of a prompt if messy conclusion to the Greek restructuring, which ended up with a CDS trigger, were left with a tranching of the Greek balance sheet into a ridiculous seven classes, which crammed down the Greek law bonds into yet another separate class, an outcome which will shortly bite the European pre-petition sovereign market (i.e., Portugal, Spain and Italy) in the ass. What we did not however underestimate at all, is the critical value of strong indenture provisions, or, in other words, the willingness of UK-law bondholders to not comply with terms forced down their throat. As reported earlier today by the Greek Ministry of Finance, a whopping 20 of 36 classes of non-Greek law bonds have rejected the nation's attempts to restructure, and now appear set for an epic legal showdown, whose outcome will determine whether or not the UK non-UK law spread will explode, or if the entire European bond market will shoot itself in the foot itself, after all strong indentures appear to be merely a bond prosectus placeholder which will never be honored. Most importantly, we are delighted that UK-law bonds have understood one thing - by being the fulcrum security as we said, they have all the leverage. If Greece thinks it can take them in court and not pay them anything, well that may well be the ballgame for the European bond market.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Daily US Opening News And Market Re-Cap: April 2





European cash equities are seen mixed as the market heads into the US session, with the DAX index the only bourse to trade higher at the midpoint of the European session. European markets were seeing some gains following the open after the weekend release of better than expected Chinese manufacturing data, however the main price action of the day occurred after some European press reports that the Bundesbank had stopped accepting sovereign bonds as collateral from Portugal, Ireland and Greece garnered attention, however the Bundesbank were quick to deny reports and state that it continues to accept all Eurozone sovereign bonds. Following the denial, participants witnessed a slight bounceback, but failed to push most markets into the green.  Data releases from Europe so far have been varied, with outperformance seen in the UK Manufacturing PMI, beating expectations and recording its highest reading since May of 2011. However, the French manufacturing PMI came in below expectations, weighing on the CAC index as the session progresses. A further release from the Eurozone has shown February unemployment coming in alongside expectations recording a slight increase from January to 10.8%.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

BRICs Bank To Rival World Bank And IMF And Challenge Dollar Dominance





On Thursday morning, President Hu Jintao of China, President Dmitry Medvedev of Russia , President Dilma Rousseff of Brazil, President Jacob Zuma of South Africa and Prime Minister Manmohan Singh of India shook hands at the start of the one day meeting in New Delhi. Top of the agenda was the creation of the grouping's first institution, a so-called "BRICS Bank" that would fund development projects and infrastructure in developing nations. Less noticed and commented upon is the aspirations of the BRIC nations to become less dependent on the global reserve currency, the dollar and to position their own currencies as internationally traded currencies. The leaders of BRIC nations and other emerging market nations have adopted the idea of conducting trade between the five nations in their own currencies. Two agreements, signed among the development banks of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, say that local currency loans will be made available for trade between these countries. The five fast growing nations participating in local currency trade will allow participants to diversify their foreign exchange reserves, hedging against the growing risk of a euro or dollar crisis. The BRICS want to have easy convertibility of currency to make it easier to use the real, ruble, rupee, renminbi and rand amongst themselves without having to always use the US dollar. Higher intra-Brics trade, conducted in their own currencies would shield their economies from economic dislocations in the west. Left unsaid so far is the possibility that one of the BRICs or the BRICs in unison might peg the value of their respective currencies to the ultimate store of value and money - gold.

 
RANSquawk Video's picture

RANsquawk: US Morning Call - ISM Manufacturing Preview: 02/04/12





 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: April 2





  • Mixed signals from China's factories in March (Reuters)
  • EU wants G20 to boost IMF funds after Eurogroup move (Reuters)
  • Euro Leaders Seek Global Help After Firewall Boosted (Bloomberg)
  • Euro-Region Unemployment Surges to Highest in More Than 14 Years (Bloomberg)
  • Big banks prepare to pay back LTRO loans (FT) ... don't hold your breath
  • Coty Inc. Proposes to Acquire Avon Products, Inc. for $23.25 Per Share in Cash (PRnewswire)
  • Spain Record Home Price Drop Seen With Bank Pressure (Bloomberg)
  • Firm dropped by Visa says under 1.5 million card numbers stolen (Reuters)
  • Japan Tankan Stagnates With Yen Seen as Threat (Bloomberg)
  • Fed to buy $44 billion Treasuries in April, sell $43 billion (Reuters)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Overnight Sentiment: Optimism Waning





The main event of the past 48 hours: the Chinese "Schrodinger" PMI, which came much weaker or stronger, depending on whether one uses the HSBC or official data (which always has a seasonal jump from February into March) has been forgotten. Any bullish sentiment from a 'hard landing-refuting' PMI (which incidentally means less chance of easing), was erased following a very weak Japanese Tankan sentiment report, which saw exporters fret about a return to Yen strength. Naturally, the market response was to immediately shift hopes and dreams of more easing to the BOJ, if the PBOC is for the time being off the hook. Alas, since the BOJ's actions have traditionally had much less impact on global markets, stocks are not happy. This was followed by a bevy of Eurozone data, where unemployment rose to 10.8% from 10.7%. And while this deterioration was expected, the slide in French PMI was not, dropping from 47.6 to 46.7, on expectations of an unchanged print. The modest bounce in German PMI and especially in the UK from 51.5 to 52.7, where QE is raging, were not enough to offset fears that it is now "France's turn" and that global PMIs are once again showing that the recent $2 trillion in global liquidity equivalent injections have already peaked, in line with expectations: after all the half life of central planning interventions is getting progressively shorter.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Previewing This Week's Key Macro Events





The week ahead will offer significant inputs to our views. ISM and payrolls will likely set the market tone for the next few weeks. Despite the softer signals from regional surveys, Goldman expects the ISM to improve at the margin relative to last month’s print. In contrast, it expects payrolls to grow by 175k, down from last month’s 227k jobs gain. FOMC minutes will likely show that Fed officials had a discussion on further easing but are unlikely to offer strong hints about the likelihood and possible timing of a third round of Quantitative Easing.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

This Is Your Country On Fat: Presenting 14 Years Of Exponential American Obesity





What can one say but "wow"... assuming one isn't chewing on some cheap, high calorie junk food at the moment of course.

 
RANSquawk Video's picture

RANsquawk EU Morning Briefing - What's Happened So Far - 02/04/12





 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: On Gold, A Cracked Dam, And The Fed's Small Thumb





The United States of America (and the rest of the world for that matter) has not fundamentally grown much at all over the last 40 years. We have instead replaced fundamental growth with the illusion of growth brought on by constantly increasing the monetary supply, aka, inflation. But like any good Ponzi scheme, even this one has a limit and investors briefly approached it in 2008.  When it looked like our global banking system was going to collapse, investors started dumping everything in site, essentially a de facto rejection of dollar based assets.  Alas, this terrible 'fiat' system is finally coming to its' inevitable end.  And good riddance at that. The death of fiat money will be the best thing to happen to human freedom and liberty in over 100 years.  However, you must realize that the deflation associated with the collapse of the dollar-based fiat monetary system will wipe out decades worth of false asset price growth in a very short time.  Think days or months.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Fast Forward Through Fiat's Fantastic Fabrications





Still confused about the fiat system praised last week so highly by the Chairman, to students from a university named for a person who would do away with the Fed in a heartbeat? The following 3:30 mintue video will explain everything.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Chart Of The Week: This Is Who Is Selling





For every seller there is a buyer. Which conversely means that for every robotic HFT, central bank or Primary Dealing buyer there is a seller. We present who that seller is...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

No Country For Thin Men: 75% Of Americans To Be Obese By 2020





While much heart palpitations are generated every month based on how much of a seasonal adjustment factor is used to fudge US employment, many forget that a much more serious long term issue for the US (assuming anyone cares what happens in the long run) is a far more ominous secular shift in US population - namely the fact that everyone is getting fatter fast, aka America's "obesity epidemic." And according to a just released analysis by BNY ConvergEx' Nicholas Colas, things are about to get much worse, because as the OECD predicts, by 2020 75% of US the population will be obese. What this implies for the tens of trillions in underfunded healthcare "benefits" in the future is all too clear. In the meantime, thanks to today's economic "news", fat people everywhere can get even fatter courtesy of ever freer money from the Chairman, about to be paradropped once more to keep nominal prices high and devalue the dollar even more in the great "race to debase". Our advice - just pretend you are going to college and take out a $100,000 loan, spending it all on Taco Bells. But don't forget to save enough for the latest iPad, and the next latest to be released in a few weeks, ad inf.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: A Postmortem Of Niall Ferguson's Otherwise Epic Lecture: Empires On The Edge Of Chaos





A few words on this IMO must watch lecture - Niall Ferguson: Empires on the Edge of Chaos  While Fergie is brilliant in his historical analysis, he gets a few niggling points wrong - Which I suspect is in part from having an Anglocentric viewpoint, which leads one to ignore some fairly hushed up (by the MSM) points of the good 'ol US of A, and in part from his rather British nature of believing in above all else, order, honoring of contracts, rule of law, and other quaint genteel notions of civil society.

 
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!