Bank of America

Bank of America
Phoenix Capital Research's picture

Since the Financial Crisis erupted in 2007, the US Federal Reserve has engaged in dozens of interventions/ bailouts to try and prop up the financial system. Now, I realize that everyone knows the Fed is “printing money.” However, when you look at the list of bailouts/ money pumps it’s absolutely staggering how much money the Fed has thrown around.

Non-Farm Payroll Preview

  • Deutsche Bank 160K
  • HSBC 174K
  • Goldman Sachs 175K
  • Citi 175K
  • Barclays Capital 175K
  • UBS 190K
  • Bank of America 200K
  • JP Morgan 210K

They Came, They Saw, They Got The Hell Out Of UBS In 7 Days

Housing is recovering. The Fed has your back. The consumer is healthy. All things that would suggest the commercial-mortgage bond business should be on the cusp of a renaissance. So the question is - what did Brett Ersoff and John Herman see, seven short days after being promoted to run the UBS real-estate finance division, that made them depart the venerable Swiss firm with the paintball sized Stamford trading floor?

tedbits's picture

Witches Brew: Part 4 - Reality Bites

  • The Specter of Things to Come

The road to ruin is on plain display and the playbook is easily seen at this juncture. Let’s take a look at how that playbook will unfold. Contrary to popular outrage of the SOLUTION being IMPOSED it is the correct one once the insured depositors where PROTECTED.  In this edition the elites suffered FIRST followed by the private sector depositors who foolishly believed false BALANCE sheets which were POLITICALLY CORRECT but PRACTICALLY incorrect fictions approved by fiduciarily (regulations and regulators allowed ONGOING insolvent operations rather than protect the public by ending and prohibiting them) challenged governments (work for the banks and crony capitalists not for the public at large).

Fed Lies On The Record To Protect Bank Of America, Pulls Testimony

In late 2010, in a superficially stunning move, Bank of America was sued by, among many others, the New York Fed over the biggest bogeyman for the bank's balance sheet - its legacy portfolio of super toxic Countrywide mortgages it inherited in the worst M&A deal of all time (its purchase of CFC) and the inheritance of woefully inadequate mortgage issuance standards which ever since then (recall our prediction on this issue) has cost the bank billions in litigiation payments and reserves.  Obviously, the Fed had no concerns about collecting the money it itself creates, and it certainly doesn't care about legality and criminal financial impropriety, so why was it among the list of plaintiffs? Simple: as we suggested back then, and as has since been proven correct, it was simply so that Bill Dudley's henchmen have a first row view of everything going on in the putback litigation that has been the primary concern for BofA, but with a few of keeping the damage to a minimum. Sure enough, Ever since then the Fed has done everything in its power to mitigate potential losses to BofA as a result of Agent Orange selling hundreds of billions in biohazardous mortgages to anyone and anything with a pulse. It has gotten so bad that the Fed was last week caught lying under testimony, forcing the Fed to take back testimony in a parallel lawsuit between AIG and BofA, which has also involved the New York Fed, as a indirect guardian of BAC's cash hoard.

Frontrunning: March 28

  • Lines Form as Cyprus Banks Reopen (WSJ)
  • Greek Bets Sank Top Cyprus Lenders - Banks at Heart of Cyprus Mess Were Bullish on Athens as Other Investors Fled (WSJ)
  • Hollande Economic Woes Masked by Cyprus Fig Leaf (BBG)
  • M&A Stumbles Amid March Deal Drought (BBG) ... but any minute now
  • Train hauling Canadian oil derails in Minnesota  (Reuters) - must be an evil pipeline riding first class
  • Slovenian Austerity After Cyprus Fails to Stem Yield Gain (BBG)
  • Banks Seek to Overturn Judge’s Ruling in Critical Mortgage Case (NYT)
  • Ships Costing U.S. $37 Billion Lack Firepower, Navy Told (BBG)
  • OECD still gloomy on eurozone recovery (FT)
  • BOJ's Kuroda says asset purchase limit already broken (Reuters)
  • Kuroda warns Japan debt ‘not sustainable’ (FT)
  • BOJ’s Kuroda Vows to Continue Easing Until 2% Target Achieved (BBG)
  • South Korea cuts economic forecast (FT)

Guest Post: Say Goodbye To The Purchasing Power Of The Dollar

Through the centuries in historic cultures like that of Yap Island who used giant, immovable stone disks for commerce, to today's United States, whose Dollar fiat currency exists primarily in digital form "money" is able to be exchanged for goods and services because society agrees to accept it (at a certain rate of exchange). But what happens when a society starts doubting the value of its money?  Perhaps the Fed has just the right talent and tools we need to finesse our way out of the challenges we face. Unlikely. The reality is, the Federal Reserve is like any other organization. Human. And fallible. For those who want to argue that the Fed, with its cadre of hyper-degreed academics and its insider access, has superior information and thus the ability to predict the future with unparalleled accuracy; we humbly ask you to watch the following...

smartknowledgeu's picture

In 2013, we are receiving the same banker and mass media propaganda that we heard in 2008. The stock markets are okay, economies are recovering, blah, blah, blah. However, do any of the facts support the propaganda? For example, this “bullish” US stock market has not even recovered to the levels of October, 2007. And even, if more QE, more HFT low-trading volume rigging can rig US and other western markets higher, do rising stock markets even matter if the growth of stock markets are less than

After Cyprus, Who Is Next?

Short answer: we don't know.

We do, however, know something we have been pointing out since early 2012 - when it comes to the funding strcuture of European banks, there is a dramatic difference between the US and Europe. In the US, as we showed most recently two months ago, the Big Three depositor banks (JPM, Wells and Bank of America, excluding the still pseudo-nationalized Citi), have a record $858 billion in excess deposits over loans. So what about Europe? Here things get bad. Very bad. So bad in fact that we covered it all just one short year ago. What is the reason for this? Well, as readers can surmise based on what just happened in Europe, it once again has to do with deposits, and specifically the loan-to-deposit ratios of European banks. Because if the US has an excess of deposits over loans, Europe is and has always suffered from the inverse: a massive excess of loans (impaired assets) compared to the most critical of bank liabilities - deposits... One doesn't have to be a rocket scientist to figure out that in a world in which European loans are massively mismarked relative to fair value, and where bad and non-performing loans are an exponentially rising component of all "asset" exposure, it will be the liabilities that are ultimately impaired. Liabilities such as deposits.

Bank Of America: "Today’s Stock Market Has Lost Some Of Its Ability To Reflect Underlying Economic Trends"

With Greenspan emerging from his crypt to confirm that he is now as clueless about everything as he was 15 years ago (although the absolutely zero reaction out of "stocks" to his statement that stocks are "very undervalued" is perhaps indicative that SkyNet may just be learning), it is appropriate to remind readers that this thing known as the "market" died some four years ago. What we have now is a vehicle with a "role in the policy fight to support spending" while "today’s stock market has arguably lost some of its ability to reflect underlying economic trends." Not our words - those of Bank of America's Ethan Harris, who, four years after the fringe blogs, finally "gets it."

Today's Pre-Ramp Preview

"Equity prices in the US and Europe have been hovering at multi-year highs. To the extent that this reflects powerful policy easing, equity markets may have lost some of its ability to reflect economic trends in exchange for an important role in the policy fight to support spending." This is a statement from a Bank of America report overnight in which the bailed out bank confirms what has been said here since the launch of QE1 - there is no "market", there is no economic growth discounting mechanism, there is merely a monetary policy vehicle. To those, therefore, who can "forecast" what this vehicle does based on the whims of a few good central planners, we congratulate them. Because, explicitly, there is no actual forecasting involved. The only question is how long does the "career trade", in which everyone must be herded into the same trades or else risk loss of a bonus or job, go on for before mean reversion finally strikes. One thing that is clear is that since news is market positive, irrelevant of whether it is good or bad, virtually everything that has happened overnight, or will happen today, does not matter, and all stock watchers have to look forward to is another low volume grind higher, as has been the case for the past two weeks.

Just Three Sticks

Three sticks and three chances for a poke in the eye. On the other hand they could be kindling for the fire or perhaps the first ingredients of alphabet soup. You see, this is what makes things so tough; we all stare at the same things, the same events and reach wildly different conclusions. The media hands out each stick as presented by the government, a corporation or someone else in a supposed leadership position. The somewhat wise can grasp that there are three sticks and not just one and the good minds recognize not only the three sticks but see that it can be made into the first letter of the alphabet. In this light then let us consider the recent proposal from the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. Under the banner of limiting the government’s support for the large U.S. banks in case one were to fail the Dallas Fed has proposed capping assets at $250 billion and of walling off investment banking from the bank...

Frontrunning: March 14

  • Dimon’s ‘Harpooned’ Whale Resurfaces With Senate Findings (BBG)
  • Greece and lenders fall out over firings (FT) - as predicted 48 hours ago
  • Dallas Fed Cap Seen Shrinking U.S. Banking Units by Half (BBG) - which is why it will never happen
  • Xi elected Chinese president (Xinhua)
  • Russia Bond Auction Bombs as ING Awaits Central Bank Clarity (BBG)
  • U.S. and U.K. in Tussle Over Libor-manipulating Trader (WSJ)
  • Chinese firm puts millions into U.S. natural gas stations (Reuters)
  • In Rare Move, Apple Goes on the Defensive Against Samsung (WSJ)
  • Berlin Airport Fiasco Shows Chinks in German Engineering Armor (BBG)
  • Ex-PIMCO executive sues firm, says was fired for reporting misdeeds (Reuters)
  • Bank of Italy Tells Banks in the Red Not to Pay Bonuses, Dividends (Reuters)