• Pivotfarm
    04/18/2014 - 12:44
    Peering in from the outside or through the looking glass at what’s going down on the other side is always a distortion of reality. We sit here in the west looking at the development, the changes and...

Bank of America

Bank of America
4closureFraud's picture

Foreclosure Fraud Redo - How to Gloss Over Perjury, Forgery, & Fraud Upon An American Court & Expect to Come Out Unjustly Enriched





Maybe. Just maybe. Maybe millions of families across America would like a similar opportunity; one where they jump at the chance to escape accountability and repercussions by a simple “redo” of their participation in an abusive, predatory financial transaction that left them completely tapped out and facing homelessness...

 


Tyler Durden's picture

RealtyTrac Opines On The Coming Wave Of GSE Foreclosure Buybacks: "The Final Liability Will Be Enormous"





As if an insolvent Europe was not enough (and everything seemed so good one short month ago), foreclosure expert firm RealtyTrac opines on the issue of fraudclosure and just how big the impact will be on the GSEs, and thus, on the upstream lenders who sold Fannie and Freddie MBS that had material misrepresentations. Add this to the over 240,000 REO properties held by the GSEs, and one can see why Jim Saccacio, CEO of RealtyTrac says: "Not only do the GSEs have an REO problem, they also have a guarantee problem because they promised to make good on the securities they sold to mortgage investors. The potential liability of the GSEs is a matter of debate but there's little doubt that the final total will be enormous.” Oops.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Will Google (And MSFT, And HP, And BAC) Be The Biggest Loser From The Irish Bailout?





A few days back we asked whether if as part of the now certain Irish austerity package, the imminent rise in the corprate tax rate for offshore companies based in Ireland would result in a crunch in the bottom line for US corporations such as Google. Now that a hike from the prevailing 12.5% rate is inevitable, US companies have launched an offensive to make it clear that only Irish citizens will be subject to the critical austerity measures. The Telegraph reports that "the Irish government has been given a stark warning from some of the biggest American companies in Ireland on the risk of a mass exodus if the country's low corporation tax rate is raised." If companies, which are purely circumventing much higher US corporate tax rates, also have to share the burden, they will simply depart from the already insolvent country, leaving it with even less tax revenues, thus accelerating the toxic loop of greater insolvency coupled with even less revenue. And since the IMF is backed primarily by the US, which is end-domicile to the bulk of the corporations in question, it is obvious that corporations have all the leverage and will most certainly get their wishes, further widening the chasm between the "corporation" and the simple Guiness-drinking, potato chewing peasant. In the brave new world, the pursuit of life, liberty and happiness appliues only financiers and corporations. Everyone else has been relegated to footnote status.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Why Pimco's Purchase Of Another $30 Billion In MBS (Much Of It On Margin) May Be Very Bad News For Bank Of America (And Taxpayers)





Bill Gross continues to telegraph that an MBS monetization announcement is just a heart beat away. Either that, or the firm is now fully convinced it will be able to putback every single MBS in its book (and then some) to some soon to be sad shell of a bank (read- Bank of America and/or Wells Fargo). In October, Pimco's Total Return Fund saw its margin cash jump by the most since February 2009: the time when the full QE1 was announced: at $28.1 billion in margin cash, the firm increased it dry leverage powder from $7.6 billion to $28 billion. And where did this money go? Virtually all of its went in Mortgage Backed Securities, which stood at $100 billion as of October 31. This is a $50 billion increase in the past two months, and brings the total to the highest since February 2009, again - just before the Fed started monetizing UST and MBS/Agency debt in earnest. As Gross never does anything without a reason (and fundamentals are never a "reason" for the Fashion Island denizens) there are only two possible explanations: either Gross knows that the Fed will have no option but to promptly shift from monetizing MBS in addition of USTs (now that rates have once again started leaking wider), a topic we have covered repeatedly in the past, of the firm is convinced it will be successful in getting the BofA's to accept all of its putback demands, and possibly more. As both outcomes will result in a material profit on all recent purchases, the bottom line is that taxpayers (either via QE or via TARP2) are about to make the GEM (Gross-El Erian-McCulley) even more valuable.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Here Comes The Pain In The Bond Market





As discussed earlier this week and last week, Murphy's law is verified in the bond market as we are inching closer to 122-30 in TY futures and the 5Y future is leaning dangerously on the 100-dma, eyeing the 118-30 support below. The market is arguably still long but trimming. All the buying last week post long end supply is getting stopped out for those who did not cash in on a quick buck, and a lot of pre-FOMC positioning is getting pushed out as well. The irony? People are starting to feed the sell-off mentioning next week's supply... just when real money is about to step up and bid the market again! If you have been playing from the short side the past couple weeks you have been right. I tried to play that way mostly with more or less success catching the tops on the pullbacks (or missing them by a few ticks), and even schatz which I thought would hold up broke the 108.80 level.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: November 18





  • Fed Orders 2nd Round of Stress Tests  (WSJ), translation: more capital raises for Bank of America, Wells Fargo and Citi.
  • Lenihan Says Ireland May Ask for Bank Package as Bailout Nears (Bloomberg)
  • One in 20 Irish Mortgages in Arrears (FT)
  • China Vows to Tame Inflation (Reuters)
  • Korea to Revive Tax on Foreigners' Bond Holdings to Slow Capital Inflows (Bloomberg)
  • IMF Says HK Currency Peg Boosting Property Prices (FT)
  • India Microcredit Faces Collapse From Defaults (NYT)
  • Vilsack: Food Costs Won't Surge  (WSJ)
  • Failed Models and the Real Costs of QE2 (Economics21)
  • California Shrinks Planned Tax-Exempt Sale, Expands Taxable (Bond Buyer)
 


Tyler Durden's picture

NACA's Bruce Marks Goes Postal At JPM Crony During Yesterday's Fraudclosure Hearing





Possibly the most incendiary moment of yesterday's fraudclosure hearing in which Bank of America and JP Morgan representatives saw no evil and heard no evil, even as Chris Dodd wanted it over so he can buy no evil with the years of accumulated lobby booty from said banks after his long overdue reign of corruption finally ends, was when the CEO of the Neighborhood Assistance Corporation of America, Bruce Marks, realized he has had enough of the endless lies and goes postal at the appropriately named JPM henchman David Lowman, CEO of Chase Home Lending. After Lowman says that "Chase strongly prefers to work with borrowers to reach a solution that lets them keep their homes" Lowman flips out. Watch the hilarious results here. This video is merely a harbinger of what happens when pent up anger at banker lies overflows. Luckily, this time everything ended peacefully, and to the banks' credit, the voice was promptly silenced. Next time, it won't be so easy...

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Chris Martenson And James Howard Kunstler Explain How "The World is Going to Get Rounder and Bigger Again"





In this week's Straight Talk with Chris Martenson, contributor is James Howard Kunstler, author and social critic. His better-known works include The Long Emergency, in which he argues that declining oil production will result in the decline of modern industrialized society and compel Americans to return to smaller-scale, localized, semi-agrarian communities; World Made By Hand and its sequel, The Witch of Hebron, all published by The Atlantic Monthly Press. He writes a weekly blog is also a leading proponent of the movement known as "New Urbanism."

 


Tyler Durden's picture

State AGs And Banks Prepare Fraudclosure Settlement, Bailout Number Two For BofA Imminent





CNBC's Diana Olick reports that the investigation into the biggest financial fraud in recent history is about to be shelved: the reason, state AGs are nearing a settlement with banks, which will slap a few wrists, will see banks put some lunch money in a settlement fund, will result in some principal reductions, and everything will be well again, as banker bonuses surpass 2009 levels (as noted previously). Retroactively in perpetuity. In other news, state sponsored fraud in America is alive and well.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Senate Hearing Over Fraudclosure Begins: Live Webcast, And Relevant Ted Kaufman Thoughts





Live coverage of the Senate Banking Committee's make believe grilling of Bank of America representative Barbara Desoer over fraudclosure starts live at 3:15pm, or was supposed to: just like the EU Press Conference, it is also late.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Advance Look At Today's 2:30 PM Senate Hearing On Fraudclosure





Today at 2:30pm the US public will get its first and certainly not last spectacle orchestrated by the banker's lame duck pet, Chris Dodd, and his Senate Banking Committee (as in bought and purchased by the banks) over fraudclosure. The hearing is titled "Problems in Mortgage Servicing From Modification to Foreclosure" and will be broadcast it on Zero Hedge. Mark your calendars: as the star witness is Bank of America President of Home Loans, Barbara Dosoer, the level of bullshit will be one for the history books.

 


Value Expectations's picture

Book Review: The Courage to Do Nothing by Bill Flax





Despite a full-time job, frequent opinion pieces, not to mention a wife and children, Bill found time to write what I think is an essential book, The Courage to Do Nothing. Flax’s excellent book is a moral defense of markets and freedom, and if read it will greatly strengthen the arguments made by existing free-market advocates, while possibly converting more than a few skeptics.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Paulson Sells Large Portions Of BofA, Citi, Wells, Capital One, Dumps All Of Goldman, Adds 500,000 In Potash Merger Arb





John Paulson's September 30 13F has been released. Total long stock holdings reported amounted to $22.9 billion, unchanged from June 30. As expected, and following hot in the footsteps of David Tepper, Paulson dumped nearly 20% of his Bank of America and Citi stakes (30 million shares and 82.7 million shares respectively), sold about 11% of Wells Fargo and Capital One, and dumped his entire 1.1 million Goldman position. Keep in mind all this was before BofA stock got crushed in October: the next 13F will be even more interesting.Other divestitures included two thirds of his stake in Family Dollar Stores, a third of his position in Starwood Hotels, and over half of his Mead Johnson Nutrition position. While Paulson did not touch much of his gold exposure (he did sell 6% of Anglogold Ashanti), he kept GLD is biggest position (for the gold denominated holdings) at $4 billion, and added about 17 new positions, the biggest of which were Anadarko (13.4 MM shares), Hewitt Associates (7.6MM shares), NBTY (6.1 MM shares), McAfee (5 MM shares), and then some notable Merger arbs: Genzyme, Burger King and Potash, in which he added 500,000 shares. Either Paulson will now have to like Potash on its fundamentals, or he will have to sell this position. Oddly enough, today's market showed remarkable unwillingness on behalf of the arbs to dump their POT holdings. One wonders how long this will continue. Additionally, Paulson sold his entire half a billion dollar stake in Exxon, a position that he held for just one quarter. In other news, obviously, the love affair with financials is at least partially over, and at this point the future of the Recovery Fund may well be in doubt if even Paulson does not see the upside case for names such as BofA which a year ago he had a PT of $30 as of 2012.

 


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