goldman sachs

goldman sachs
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Gartman vs Goldman: "Oil Rally To Fade" Warns Blankfein's Bank

Just a day after no lesser world-renowned newsletter writer than Dennis Gartman went full bull-tard of crude oil (in $29.95 terms), Goldman Sachs has come out with a "lower for longer" warning about the crude complex noting that the gains have been exacerbated by still large short positioning and the break of key technical levels. Despite the magnitude of this rally, Goldman does not believe that data releases over the past week suggest a change in oil fundamentals. In fact, high frequency data continue to point to an oversupplied market despite a gradual decline in US production.

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Day After Deutsche Bank Admits Not All Is Well, Swiss Giant Credit Suisse Also Admits It Needs More Cash

Not everything is "fine" in the land of European banks, in fact quite the opposite.

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Frontrunning: October 8

  • Congress probing U.S. spy agencies' possible lapses on Russia (Reuters)
  • Defense Ministers From NATO Hit Out at Russian Action in Syria (WSJ)
  • U.S. Rules Out Cooperation With Russia as Moscow Launches First Naval Strikes on Syria (WSJ)
  • Man Who Called China's Boom and Bust Says Use This Rally to Sell (BBG)
  • For Volkswagen, New Questions Arise on U.S. Injury Reporting (BBG)
  • Deutsche Bank May Swell $14 Billion Selloff in China Bank Stakes (BBG)
  • Emerging market slowdown hits German exports (FT)
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The First Crack: Deutsche Bank Preannounces Massive Loss, May Cut Dividend

Deutsche Bank warned it expects to record a third-quarter loss of $7 billion, tied to a huge write-down in its corporate-banking-and-securities segment.  The bank said the charges are driven by the impact of expected higher regulatory capital requirements and its disposal of Postbank. It also said it will consider reducing or eliminating its common dividend for fiscal 2015.


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Bernanke's Balderdash

The US and world economies are drifting inexorably into the next recession owing to the deflationary collapse of commodities, capital spending and world trade. These are the inevitable “morning after” consequence of the 20-year global credit binge which has now reached its apogee. The apparent global boom during that period was actually a central bank driven excursion into the false economics of household borrowing to inflate consumption in the DM economies; and frenzied, uneconomic investing to inflate GDP in China and the EM. The common denominator was falsification of financial prices. By destroying honest price discovery in the financial markets, the world’s convoy of money-printing central banks led by the Fed elicited a huge excess of financialization relative to economic output.

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Frontrunning: October 7

  • How Iranian general plotted out Syrian assault in Moscow (Reuters)
  • China FX reserves post record quarterly fall as cenbank steps up yuan support (Reuters)
  • MSF calls for independent inquiry into U.S. attack on Afghan hospital (Reuters)
  • Yen Advances as Bank of Japan Refrains From Adding to Stimulus (Reuters)
  • Abu Dhabi Said to Explore Asset Sales After Slump in Oil Price (BBG)
  • U.S. Oil Approaching $50 Boosts Stocks as Emerging Markets Surge (BBG)
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The Liquidations Begin: Three Hedge Funds Shut Down After Summer Rout

"As you know, the environment for global macro fundamentals-based trading continues to be challenging. That factor, combined with the lack of certainty over when a recovery will take hold, led us to conclude that the time was right to return capital to you."

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Peter Schiff: The Fed Has Created A "Bad Is Good" Economy

The popular belief that the U.S. economy has been steadily recovering has endured months of disappointing data without losing much of its appeal. But the downright dismal September jobs report that was released last Friday may prove to be the flashing red beacon that even the most skilled apologists can't explain away. But rather than questioning the Fed's credibility in missing another forecast, most economists are lauding it for supposedly seeing weakness that others missed, which allowed it to wisely do nothing in September. But this is simply a continuation of the Fed's long-standing playbook: Talk the economy up through optimistic statements while continually holding off an actual rate hike that the Fed is concerned could undermine an economy teetering on the brink of recession.

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Who Owns Your Presidential Candidate?

Despite the arguably undemocratic, obfuscating nature of our nation’s campaign finance laws and the blatant corporatist agenda mandated by the Supreme Court, let’s attempt to break down the major sources of political spending so far in the 2016 presidential election. You may be surprised to find out who is donating money to your candidate — and how that contribution may affect future policy positions.

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Weekend Reading: Capacious Cognitions

With the Federal Reserve still hinting at raising interest rates, but trapped by weak economic growth, will the next big move by the Fed be another form of monetary accommodation instead? Or, are the underlying dynamics of the economy and market really strong enough to shake off the recent weakness and continue its bullish ascent?

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What's The Worst That Could Happen?

The 30 stocks of the Dow Jones Industrial Average currently trade for an average of 14.8x next year’s consensus earnings.  But... Everyone knows Wall Street analysts are always too optimistic, so what if we just look at the lowest estimate for each company? The driver of market pessimism sits at the top of the income statement – the Street’s worst case revenue estimates call for a decline of 1.7% in 2016.  Now, Q3 earnings season is unlikely to provide much comfort here; why should corporate managements go out on a guidance limb when their stocks are down on the year?  All this points to further volatility in October, and with a bias to the downside.

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Payrolls Preview: Goldman Says 'Beat', Fed Regional Surveys Signal 'Huge Miss'

Goldman forecasts nonfarm payroll growth of 215k in September, above consensus expectations of 200k by about 0.3 standard deviations of a typical surprise. Noting that August payrolls were likely distorted downward by seasonal bias last month and may be revised up, Goldman expects the unemployment rate to remain flat at 5.1% (and earnings growth to slow). Howver, judging by the collapse in September's regional Fed surveys, today's "most important" payrolls data ever could be a massive miss.

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