Monetization

Monetization

Japan's Top Credit Analyst Predicts 30Y Treasury Yield Plunging To Zero In 2 Years

In a time when one strategist after another is pointing to the latest rebound in rates and bond yields, and furiously declaring - to anyone who cares to listen - that this is it, yields are now and forever done going lower, Toshihiro Uomoto, Nomura Holdings’s chief credit strategist, in a report issued overnight, forecast that the yield on 30-year US Treasuries could plunge to zero in two years as a result of yield-starved "Japanese money" flooding the US and chasing returns of US Treasuries.

Japanese Government Bonds Are Crashing

Ahead of tonight's 10Y JGB auction and reportedly the unleashing of Abe's fiscal stimulus, it appears the world's investors are losing faith in the Bank of Japan's buying power and the MoF's credibility as Japanese government bonds are collapsing for the 3rd day in a row. With the biggest crash in prices (JGB Futures) since May 2013 (back to 5 month lows), yield across the entire JGB curve are exploding higher since Kuroda punted last week and questioned monetary policy effectiveness.

What Alan Greenspan Is Most Worried About

"... it's very difficult to see where the next step is except what I'm concerned about mostly, is stag-flation, meaning I think we're seeing the very early signs of inflation beginning finally to pick up as the issue of deflation fades.... we're in a situation now where looking at the interest rate levels that we're looking at and the inflation rates we're looking at, it's very clear that we're going to be moving reasonably shortly into a wholly different phase."

Previewing The BOJ's Decision: What Wall Street Expects Will Happen

As BBG's Vincent Cingarella says, nothing short of a Herculean effort is likely to weaken the Yen over the long-term amid speculation about what the BOJ and government stimulus will look like. Over the short-term it is a different story. Here is what Wall Street thinks The Bank of Japan will announce today.

Yen Plunges On Yet Another Strawman Headline About Stimulus, Then Surges On Denial

That didn't last long - Japan Ministry of Finance say it is not true they are considering 50yr bonds - debunking earlier WSJ story --Rtrs

USDJPY just spiked back over 106.00 after headlines suggesting Japanese PM Shinzo Abe will unveil new stimulus as soon as today. News reports on 27t yen fiscal stimulus and issuance of 50-year bond, both spur yen selling, says David Lu, HK-based director at NBC Financial Markets Asia. We suspect there will be some disappointment after the algos are finished as FNN reports the package will include 13t yen of low-interest loans (so a smaller helicopter than expected) and besides, it's not like the Japanese are suffering from rate being too high.

G-20 Meeting Ends With Rising Discord Between China And US

While the G-20 group traditionally tries to put on a united front, a curious divergence emerged following the latest meeting in China, where as Bloomberg notes Chinese and U.S. officials "showed signs of being at odds on how synchronized efforts to boost global growth need to be, with China stressing the need for improved coordination more than the U.S."U.S. Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew on Thursday talked down the need for crisis-level coordination as he headed to Chengdu, China, for the meeting.

"What Has Been Will Be Again" - Today's Fantasies Are Vast & Unremitting

Simple logic seems to have been suspended for the near universal disregard of the rules of common sense in the treatment of the money supply of the world.  How long can this possibly persist?  Obviously, at some point, this fantasy will be shattered. For just because central banks have continuously increased their balance sheets in recent years without igniting runaway price inflation doesn’t mean the danger isn’t there.  Remember, correlation doesn’t imply causation.  But it can imply confusion.

Why SocGen Thinks There Is Less Than 1% Chance That 10-Year Yields Will Fall Below 1.1%

SocGen has become the latest in a long and illustrious line of (so far wrong) forecasters, to predict that the 30-year-old bond rally is finally over. Using a new and improved "model", the French bank says that there’s less than a 1 percent chance U.S. 10-year yields fall below 1.1% especially as the Federal Reserve moves to raise interest rates. "Our analysis shows a roughly an adjusted fair value for the 10yT of 1.95%." Here's why.

This 'Market' Discounts Nothing Except Monetary Cocaine

In short, the market is not trading on a rebound in GDP, revenue growth or a breakout of already elevated profit margins. It’s just high on one more dose of monetary cocaine that in short order will prove to have been not even that.