China

China
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: June 19





  • With big conditions, China Offers $43 Billion for IMF Crisis War Chest (Reuters)... US offers $0.00
  • Mexico is not Spain: Mexican Yields Drop to Record as Spain’s Borrowing Costs Soar (Bloomberg)
  • And live from Las Ventanas al Paraiso: G-20 Leaders Focus on Banks as Spain's Woes Challenge Merkel (Bloomberg)
  • German Constitutional Court Gives Victory to Opposition in ESM Suit (WSJ)
  • EU Europe’s Leaders Urged to Resolve Crisis (FT)
  • Backing Grows for One EU Bank Supervisor (FT)
  • Greek Leaders Close to Coalition, Aim to Ease Bailout (Reuters)
  • China Economy Improves in June, Commerce Minister Chen Says (Bloomberg)
  • China Looks for Loan Boost (WSJ)
 
CrownThomas's picture

ZH Evening Wrap Up 6/18/12





News & headlines from the day

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: How to Save Your Money And Your Life





You should do the following.

  1. Maintain significant bank and brokerage accounts outside your home country. Consider setting up an offshore asset protection trust. These things aren't as easy to do as they used to be. But they'll likely be much less easy in the future.
  2. Make sure you have a significant portion of your wealth in precious metals and a significant part of that offshore.
  3. Buy some nice foreign real estate, ideally in a place where you wouldn't mind spending some time.
  4. Work on getting official residency in another country, as well as a second citizenship/passport. There's every advantage to doing so, and no disadvantages. That's true of all these things.

One more thing: Don't worry too much. All countries seem to go through nasty phases. Within the lifetime of most people today, we've seen it in big countries such as Russia, Germany and China. And in scores of smaller ones – the list is too long to recount here. The good news is that things almost always get better, eventually.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Daily US Opening News And Market Re-Cap: June 18





Relief in the markets, after the worst case scenario from the Greek elections was averted, proved to be decidedly short-lived. Although the pro-bailout New Democracy party came in first with 129 seats (with an additional 50 seat bonus) the markets still await confirmation of an actual working coalition given a caretaker government has been in place now for approximately two months. A degree of uncertainty in regards to the demands the new coalition will place on negotiating the country's bailout terms has resulted in many investors being unwilling to get their toes wet just yet. Away from the election fever, rising Spanish yields continue to spook the market with the 10yr yield breaching the 7% level, prompting aggressive re-widening of the 10yr government bond yield spreads. The move comes at a crucial time for Spain as they look to come to market tomorrow in 12 and 18 month bills followed by three shorter dated bonds to be tapped this Thursday. Meanwhile, the FX markets have reflected the shift in sentiment with EUR/USD well off its overnight highs and the USD index firmly supported by the prevailing flight to quality bid. However, the biggest currency move of the day came in the early hours after the rupee (INR) weakened substantially following the RBI's decision to leave rates on hold, this coupled with Fitch changing the country's outlook to negative from stable has kept the currency under pressure throughout the day.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: The Tiresome Eurozone Soap Opera Has Entered Re-Runs





What's more tiresome than a hastily rehearsed soap opera that replays the same boring plots again and again? Re-Runs of that soap opera. The Eurozone "drama" is now in re-runs and I for one am switching channels. Nothing will change until some critical part of the worm-eaten, corrupt construct of artifice and denial collapses in a heap. Until then, all we have is replays of the same boring plot lines:

Put-upon Greece: We were just minding our business here in the sunny south, living happily on borrowed billions in a thoroughly corrupt Status Quo, and suddenly we're debt-serfs squeezed by rapacious Eurozone enforcers of the banking cartel. What did we do to deserve this? It's not fair.

Put-upon Germany: We were just minding the store here, racking up 40% of our GDP in exports and raking in bank profits loaning money to our Eurozone compatriots, when suddenly everyone who's lived beyond their means demands that we refinance their debts because we're rich. Excuse us, but did anyone look at how we got rich? Hard work, cuts in spending, high taxes and a tight lid on wages. What did we do to deserve this? It's not fair.

Married couple in counseling: France and Germany: It's all his/her fault. They never bothered to understand me, etc.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Four Bullet Points Explaining How JPMorgan Doubled Its Money From MF Global's Corpse In Seven Months





Don't read this if you have high blood pressure or if you are a client of MF Global's, whose money is still held by JP Morgan.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

On The Keynesian Lunacy Of Targeting Outcomes





The pages of the financial press overflow with opinions on what targets would make the world safer: what ratio of risk-weighted-assets banks should target, what RoE targets they would be safe at, what inflation target the central bank should aim for, or what growth target is appropriate for China. When SocGen's Dylan Grice was asked if he was a fan of the idea of nominal GDP targets! He snapped he is not and thought it "a terrible idea". As he opines, today’s various issues – the euro, China’s economy, over-indebtedness – are the cumulative unintended consequences of such past targets, and the naïve presumption that complexity can be commanded. Even mildly complex systems, any outcome is the wrong thing to target, with the process being where the focus should be. Expressing how little time he has for macroeconomics, reasoning that it’s obsessed with the targeting of interest rates, GDP, inflation, unemployment, exchange rates, et cetera, as though such a thing was possible without unintended consequences; Grice notes that Austrian economists understood this too. Ludwig von Mises distilled social phenomena to the simple observation that "man acts purposefully".

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Gold Will Be Top Performer in 2012 - UBS Poll Of 8 Trillion USD Official Sector





More than 80 institutions with collective assets under management of over $8 trillion attended the event and were polled regarding macroeconomic matters and their outlook for various asset classes. Gold is seen as one of the assets likely to outperform again in 2012 due to risks posed to the euro and longer term risks for the dollar. Those polled by UBS were also positive on emerging market debt. Both asset classes, gold and emerging market debt, were the top pick of 22.5% of the assembly – thereby accounting for 45% of the votes. On gold’s role as a reserve asset, the importance reserve managers attach to the yellow metal has slipped back to 2009 levels, with about 14% having the opinion that it will be the most important reserve currency in 25 years. This marks a decline from the past two years’ surveys wherein over 20% viewed gold to be the most important reserve currency. 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: June 15





  • Greece is Relevant: Central Banks Warn Greek-Led Euro Stress Threatens World (Bloomberg)
  • Greece is very Relevant: World Economies Prepare for Panic After Greek Polls (Reuters)
  • ECB's Draghi flags euro risks, spurs rate cut talk (Reuters)
  • And as usual, beggars can be choosers... Hollande Urges Common Euro Debt, Greater ECB Role (Reuters)
  • Wait and flee - Electoral uncertainty sends the economy into suspended animation (Economist)
  • The EU Smiled While Spain’s Banks Cooked the Books (Bloomberg)
  • Osborne’s £100bn Plan for UK Economy (FT)
  • Two Cheers for Britain’s Bank Reform Plans: Martin Wolf (FT)
  • BOJ Holds Policy Ahead of Greek Vote with Eye on Global Markets (Bloomberg)
  • China Hits Back at U.S. Criticisms at WTO (Reuters)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Two Hours After Fed Buys 30 Year Bonds, Treasury Sells 30 Year Bonds At Record Low Yield





Same time, same place, One day later. After yesterday the Treasury engaged in nearly contemporaneous monetization in the 10 Year bond courtesy of the Fed, first buying then selling the paper, at a record low yield of course, so minutes ago the Treasury just sold $13 billion in 30 year paper at another fresh record low yield of 2.72%, down from 3.06% in April. Ignore that the Bid To Cover plunged from 2.73 to 2.40, the lowest since November 2011, and that Indirects were barely interested, taking down just 32.5%, it was all about the Directs, whose 24% take down soared, and as in yesterday's case, was one of the Top 5 highest ever. China? or Pimco? We will find out soon. Dealers were left with the balance, or 43.5% the lowest since October 2011. Something tells us that once the Fed extends Twist, or engages in more outright LSAPs, we will be seeing much more of this same day turnaround service as little by little all interest-rate sensitive instruments slowly grind down to zero.

 
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